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Southeast Asian Games

The Southeast Asian Games, also known as the SEA Games (SEAG), is a biennial multi-sport event involving participants from the current 11 countries of Southeast Asia. The games are under the regulation of the Southeast Asian Games Federation with supervision by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA).

Southeast Asian Games
The Southeast Asian Games Federation logo
AbbreviationSEA Games
First event1959 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games in Bangkok, Thailand
Occur every2 years (every odd year)
Next event2021 Southeast Asian Games in Hanoi, Vietnam
PurposeMulti sport event for nations on the Southeast Asian subcontinent
HeadquartersBangkok, Thailand
PresidentCharouck Arirachakaran
WebsiteSEAGFOffice.org

The Southeast Asian Games is one of the five subregional Games of the Olympic Council of Asia (OCA). The others are the Central Asian Games, the East Asian Youth Games, the South Asian Games, and the West Asian Games.

Contents

The Southeast Asian Games owes its origins to the South East Asian Peninsular Games or SEAP Games. On 22 May 1958, delegates from the countries in Southeast Asian Peninsula attending the Asian Games in Tokyo, Japan had a meeting and agreed to establish a sports organization. The SEAP Games was conceptualized by Luang Sukhum Nayaoradit, then Vice-President of the Thailand Olympic Committee. The proposed rationale was that a regional sports event will help promote co-operation, understanding, and relations among countries in the Southeast Asian region.

Six countries, Burma (now Myanmar), Kampuchea (now Cambodia), Laos, Malaya (now Malaysia), Thailand and the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) were the founding members. These countries agreed to hold the Games biennially in June 1959 and the SEAP Games Federation Committee was formed thereafter.

The first SEAP Games were held in Bangkok from 12–17 December 1959, with more than 527 athletes and officials from 6 countries; Burma (now Myanmar), Laos, Malaya, Singapore, South Vietnam and Thailand participated in 12 sports.

At the 8th SEAP Games in 1975, the SEAP Federation considered the inclusion of Brunei, Indonesia, and the Philippines. These countries were formally admitted in 1977, the same year when SEAP Federation changed their name to the Southeast Asian Games Federation (SEAGF), and the games were known as the Southeast Asian Games. Despite its location closer to the Pacific archipelago than the Asian continent and not being a member of ASEAN, East Timor was admitted at the 22nd Southeast Asian Games in 2003 HanoiHo Chi Minh City.

The 2009 Southeast Asian Games was the first time Laos has ever hosted a Southeast Asian Games (Laos had previously declined to host the 1965 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games citing financial difficulties). Running from 9–18 December, it has also commemorated the 50 years of the Southeast Asian Games, held in Vientiane, Laos.

The Southeast Asian Games logo was introduced during the 1959 edition in Bangkok, depicting six rings that represent the six founding members and was used until the 1997 edition in Jakarta. The number of rings increased to 10 during the 1999 edition in Brunei to reflect the inclusion of Singapore which was admitted into the Southeast Asian Games Federation in 1961 and Brunei, Indonesia, and the Philippines which joined the organization in 1977. The number of rings was again increased to 11 during the 2011 games in Indonesia to reflect the federation's newest member, East Timor which was admitted in 2003.

NOC Names Formal Names Debuted IOC code Other codes used
Brunei Nation of Brunei, the Abode of Peace 1977 BRU BRN (ISO)
Cambodia Kingdom of Cambodia 1961 CAM KHM (1972–1976, ISO)
Indonesia Republic of Indonesia 1977 INA IHO (1952), IDN (FIFA, ISO)
Laos Lao People's Democratic Republic 1959 LAO
Malaysia Federation of Malaysia 1959 MAS MAL (1952 − 1988), MYS (ISO)
Myanmar Republic of the Union of Myanmar 1959 MYA BIR (1948 – 1988), MMR (ISO)
Philippines Republic of the Philippines 1977 PHI PHL (ISO)
Singapore Republic of Singapore 1959 SGP SIN (1959 – 2016)
Thailand Kingdom of Thailand 1959 THA
Timor-Leste Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste 2003 TLS IOA (2000)
Vietnam Socialist Republic of Vietnam 1959 VIE VET (1964), VNM (1968–1976, ISO)

Since the Southeast Asian Games began in 1959, it has been held in 15 cities across all Southeast Asian countries except Cambodia and East Timor.

List of Southeast Asian Games
Games Year Host country Opened by Date Sports Events Nations Competitors Top-ranked team Ref
Southeast Asian Peninsular Games
1 1959 Bangkok, Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 12–17 December 12 N/A 6 518 Thailand(THA) [1]
2 1961 Yangon, Burma President Win Maung 11–16 December 13 N/A 7 623 Burma(BIR) [2]
1963 Awarded to Cambodia, cancelled due to domestic political situation
3 1965 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Ismail Nasiruddin 14–21 December 14 N/A 6 963 Thailand(THA) [3]
4 1967 Bangkok, Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 9–16 December 16 N/A 6 984 Thailand(THA) [4]
5 1969 Yangon, Burma Prime Minister Ne Win 6–13 December 15 N/A 6 920 Burma(BIR) [5]
6 1971 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Abdul Halim 6–13 December 15 N/A 7 957 Thailand(THA) [6]
7 1973 Singapore President Benjamin Sheares 1–8 September 16 N/A 7 1632 Thailand(THA) [7]
8 1975 Bangkok, Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 9–16 December 18 N/A 4 1142 Thailand(THA) [8]
Southeast Asian Games
9 1977 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Yahya Petra 19–26 November 18 N/A 7 N/A Indonesia(INA) [9]
10 1979 Jakarta, Indonesia President Suharto 21–30 September 18 N/A 7 N/A Indonesia(INA) [10]
11 1981 Manila, Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos 6–15 December 18 N/A 7 ≈1800 Indonesia(INA) [11]
12 1983 Singapore President Devan Nair 28 May – 6 June 18 N/A 8 N/A Indonesia(INA) [12]
13 1985 Bangkok, Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 8–17 December 18 N/A 8 N/A Thailand(THA) [13]
14 1987 Jakarta, Indonesia President Suharto 9–20 September 26 N/A 8 N/A Indonesia(INA) [14]
15 1989 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Azlan Shah 20–31 August 24 N/A 9 ≈2800 Indonesia(INA) [15]
16 1991 Manila, Philippines President Corazon Aquino 24 November – 3 December 28 N/A 9 N/A Indonesia(INA) [16]
17 1993 Singapore President Wee Kim Wee 12–20 June 29 N/A 9 ≈3000 Indonesia(INA) [17]
18 1995 Chiang Mai, Thailand Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn 9–17 December 28 N/A 10 3262 Thailand(THA) [18]
19 1997 Jakarta, Indonesia President Suharto 11–19 October 36 490 10 5179 Indonesia(INA) [19]
20 1999 Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah 7–15 August 21 233 10 2365 Thailand(THA) [20]
21 2001 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Salahuddin 8–17 September 32 391 10 4165 Malaysia(MAS) [21]
22 2003 Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Prime Minister Phan Văn Khải 5–13 December 32 442 11 ≈5000 Vietnam(VIE) [22]
23 2005 Manila, Philippines President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo 27 November – 5 December 40 443 11 5336 Philippines(PHI) [23]
24 2007 Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn 6–15 December 43 475 11 5282 Thailand(THA) [24]
25 2009 Vientiane, Laos President Choummaly Sayasone 9–18 December 29 372 11 3100 Thailand(THA) [25]
26 2011 Jakarta and Palembang, Indonesia President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono 11–22 November 44 545 11 5965 Indonesia(INA) [26]
27 2013 Naypyidaw, Myanmar Vice President Nyan Tun 11–22 December 37 460 11 4730 Thailand(THA) [27]
28 2015 Singapore President Tony Tan 5–16 June 36 402 11 4370 Thailand(THA) [28]
29 2017 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Muhammad V 19–30 August 38 404 11 4709 Malaysia(MAS) [29]
30 2019 Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte 30 November – 11 December 56 530 11 5630 Philippines(PHI) [30]
31 2021 Hanoi, Vietnam Prime Minister
Phạm Minh Chính
12–23 May 2022 40 520 Future event
32 2023 Phnom Penh, Cambodia King Norodom Sihamoni (expected) 5—16 May Future event
33 2025 Chonburi, Thailand King Vajiralongkorn (expected) 7–19 December Future event
34 2027 Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah (expected) 10–21 December Future event
35 2029 Laos TBD Future event

The 1963 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games were canceled. As the designated host, Cambodia was not able to host the event due to instability in the country, along with a disagreement with the International Amateur Athletic Federation. The 3rd SEAP Games then passed to Laos as hosts, but they begged off the 1965 event citing financial difficulties.

According to the SEAGF Charter and Rules, a host nation must stage a minimum of 22 sports: the two compulsory sports from Category 1 (athletics and aquatics), in addition to a minimum of 14 sports from Category 2 (Olympics and Asian Games mandatory sports), and a maximum of 8 sports from Category 3 (shaded grey in the table below). Each sport shall not offer more than 5% of the total medal tally, except for athletics, aquatics and shooting (the shot was elevated for this category in 2013). For each sport and event to be included, a minimum of four countries must participate in it. Sports competed in the Olympic Games and Asian Games must be given priority.

Sport Years
Archery 1977–1997, since 2001
Arnis 1991, 2005, 2019
Athletics All
Badminton All
Baseball 2005–2007, 2011, since 2019
Basketball 1979–2003, 2007, since 2011
Billiards and snooker Since 1991
Bodybuilding 1987–1993, 1997, 2003–2007,
2013
Bowling 1977–1979, 1983–2001,
2005–2007, 2011, since 2015
Boxing All
Canoeing 1985, 1995, 2001, 2005–2007,
2011–2015, since 2019
Chess 2003–2005, 2011–2013, since 2019
Chinlone 2013 only
Contract bridge 2011 only
Cricket 2017 only
Cycling 1959-1979, since 1983
Dancesport 2005–2009, since 2019
Diving Since 1965
Duathlon Since 2019
eSports Since 2019
Equestrian 1983, 1995, 2001, 2005–2007,
2011–2017
Fencing 1974–1978, since 1986
Field hockey 1971–1979, 1983, 1987–1989,
1993–2001, 2007, 2013–2017
Figure skating Since 2017
Fin swimming 2003, 2009–2011
Floorball 2015, 2019
Football All
Futsal 2007, 2011–2013, 2017
Golf 1985–1997, 2001, since 2005
Gymnastics 1979–1981, 1985–1997,
2001–2007, 2011, since 2015
Handball 2005–2007
Beach handball Since 2019
Ice hockey Since 2017
Indoor hockey Since 2017
Ju-jitsu Since 2019
Judo 1967–1997, since 2001
Karate 1985–1991, 1995–1997,
2001–2013, 2017
Kenpō 2011–2013
Sport Years
Kickboxing Since 2019
Kurash Since 2019
Lawn bowls 1997, 2001, 2005–2007, Since 2017
Modern pentathlon Since 2019
Muay 2005–2009, 2013, Since 2019
Netball 2001, since 2015
Obstacle racing Since 2019
Paragliding 2011 only
Pencak silat 1987–1989, 1993–1997,
since 2001
Pétanque Since 2001
Polo 2007, Since 2017
Roller sports 2011 only
Rowing 1989–1991, 1997, 2001–2007,
2011–2015, since 2019
Rugby union 1969, 1977–1979, 1995, 2007
Rugby sevens Since 2015
Sailing 1961, 1967–1971, 1975–1977,
1983–1997, 2001, 2005–2007,
since 2011
Sambo Since 2019
Sepak takraw 1967–1969, since 1973
Shooting All
Short track speed skating since 2017
Shuttle cock 2007–2009
Skateboarding Since 2019
Sport climbing 2011 only
Softball 1981–1983, 1989, 2003–2005,
2011, 2015, since 2019
Soft tennis 2011, since 2019
Squash 1991–2001, 2005–2007,
since 2015
Swimming All
Surfing Since 2019
Synchronized swimming 2001, 2011, since 2015
Table tennis All
Taekwondo Since 1985
Tennis 1959–2011, since 2015
Traditional boat race 1993, 1997–1999,
2003–2007, 2011–2015
Triathlon 2005–2007, since 2015
Volleyball 1959–1997, since 2001
Vovinam 2011–2013
Water polo 1965–2017
Water skiing 1987, 1997, 2011, 2015–2017
Wakeboarding Since 2019
Weightlifting 1959–1997, 2001–2013, since 2017
Wrestling 1987, 1997, 2003–2013, since 2019
Wushu 1991–1993, 1997, since 2001

Corrected after balancing the data of the Olympic Council of Asia and other archived sites which had kept the previous Southeast Asian Games medal tables. Some information from the aforementioned sites are missing, incorrect and or not updated.

All-time Southeast Asian Games medal table[1]
RankNOCGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Thailand(THA)1885193019435758
2 Indonesia(INA)1824170317805307
3 Malaysia(MAS)[2]1303127316854261
4 Philippines(PHI)1067119314773737
5 Singapore(SGP)947100213633312
6 Vietnam(VIE)[3]9289679912886
7 Myanmar(MYA)[4]5647419922297
8 Cambodia(CAM)[5]69115258442
9 Laos(LAO)6993319481
10 Brunei(BRU)1455163232
11 East Timor(TLS)362635
Totals (11 NOCs)867390781099728748

  • ^[1] - 2017 Southeast Asian Games medal counts are not yet included in these medal standings due to ongoing doping cases during those games
  • ^[2] – Competed as Malaya in the inaugural games until 1961.
  • ^[3] – The Republic of Vietnam was dissolved in July 1976 when it merged with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) to become the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, also known as Vietnam. Therefore, the medal counts for this country are considered to be as until 1975. In the 1989 edition, a unified Vietnam rejoined the games with a new name and flag. Medals won by South Vietnam are already combined here. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) does not use codes for South Vietnam anymore after the unification with North Vietnam.
  • ^[4] – Competed as Burma until 1987.
  • ^[5] – Competed as Kampuchea, and Khmer Republic.

Various individuals have won multiple medals at the Games, including the preceding Southeast Asian Peninsular Games.

As of 2019, Singaporean swimmer Joscelin Yeo has won the most Southeast Asian Games medals with 55 (40 gold, 12 silver, 3 bronze). She reached this milestone during the 2005 Games, overtaking the previous record of 39 gold medals set by another Singaporean swimmer Patricia Chan.

The games are unique in that it has no official limits to the number of sports and events to be contested, and the range can be decided by the organizing host pending approval by the Southeast Asian Games Federation. Aside from mandatory sports, the host is free to drop or introduce other sports or events (See Southeast Asian Games sports).

This leeway has resulted in hosts maximizing their medal hauls by dropping sports disadvantageous to themselves relative to their peers and the introduction of obscure sports, often at short notice, thus preventing most other nations from building credible opponents. Examples of these include:

  1. Games page of the website of the Olympic Council of Asia; retrieved 2010-07-09.
  2. "South East Asian Games Federation: Charter and Rules"(PDF). SEAGF. 30 May 2010. Retrieved30 December 2015.
  3. The 2019 Southeast Asian Games is the first officially decentralized games. While games were held in various cities, mostly in the Clark, Metro Manila and the Subic Bay areas, there is no designated host city for this edition alternately known as "Philippines 2019".
  4. "SEA Games Federation Council confirms host countries". Retrieved19 November 2020.
  5. "SEA Games Federation Council confirms host countries". Retrieved19 November 2020.
  6. "SEA Games Federation Council confirms host countries". Retrieved19 November 2020.
  7. "History of the SEA Games". www.olympic.org.my. Archived from the original on 17 December 2004. Retrieved26 February 2013.
  8. Ian De Cotta (5 June 2015). "A cool addition to the SEA Games". Today Online. Retrieved5 June 2015.
  9. "South East Asian Games Medal Count". Retrieved31 August 2017.
  10. SEAP Games Federation
  11. Medal Tally 1959-1995
  12. Medal Tally
  13. History of the SEA Games
  14. SEA Games previous medal table
  15. SEA Games members
  16. Pattharapong Rattanasevee (21 July 2017). "Southeast Asian Games yet to win gold for sporting spirit". South China Morning Post.
  17. Sea Games morphing into a monster-cum-circus
  18. Sea Games reduced to a carnival
  19. Sports. "VietNamNet - SEA Games or a village festival | SEA Games or a village festival". English.vietnamnet.vn. Retrieved2 June 2011.
  20. HS Manjunath (10 December 2013). "Cambodia eye record medal haul". The Phnom Penh Post. Retrieved13 December 2013.
  21. "4 new sports we can now watch in 2017 SEA Games". Red Bull. Retrieved29 August 2017.

Southeast Asian Games
Southeast Asian Games Language Watch Edit 160 160 Redirected from SEA Games The Southeast Asian Games also known as the SEA Games SEAG is a biennial multi sport event involving participants from the current 11 countries of Southeast Asia The games are under the regulation of the Southeast Asian Games Federation with supervision by the International Olympic Committee IOC and the Olympic Council of Asia OCA Southeast Asian GamesThe Southeast Asian Games Federation logoAbbreviationSEA GamesFirst event1959 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games in Bangkok ThailandOccur every2 years every odd year Next event2021 Southeast Asian Games in Hanoi VietnamPurposeMulti sport event for nations on the Southeast Asian subcontinentHeadquartersBangkok ThailandPresidentCharouck ArirachakaranWebsiteSEAGFOffice org The Southeast Asian Games is one of the five subregional Games of the Olympic Council of Asia OCA The others are the Central Asian Games the East Asian Youth Games the South Asian Games and the West Asian Games 1 Contents 1 History 2 Logo 3 Participating NOCs 4 Host nations and cities 5 Sports 6 All time medal table 7 List of multiple Southeast Asian Games medalists 8 Criticism 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory EditThe Southeast Asian Games owes its origins to the South East Asian Peninsular Games or SEAP Games On 22 May 1958 delegates from the countries in Southeast Asian Peninsula attending the Asian Games in Tokyo Japan had a meeting and agreed to establish a sports organization The SEAP Games was conceptualized by Luang Sukhum Nayaoradit then Vice President of the Thailand Olympic Committee The proposed rationale was that a regional sports event will help promote co operation understanding and relations among countries in the Southeast Asian region Six countries Burma now Myanmar Kampuchea now Cambodia Laos Malaya now Malaysia Thailand and the Republic of Vietnam South Vietnam were the founding members These countries agreed to hold the Games biennially in June 1959 and the SEAP Games Federation Committee was formed thereafter 2 The first SEAP Games were held in Bangkok from 12 17 December 1959 with more than 527 athletes and officials from 6 countries Burma now Myanmar Laos Malaya Singapore South Vietnam and Thailand participated in 12 sports At the 8th SEAP Games in 1975 the SEAP Federation considered the inclusion of Brunei Indonesia and the Philippines These countries were formally admitted in 1977 the same year when SEAP Federation changed their name to the Southeast Asian Games Federation SEAGF and the games were known as the Southeast Asian Games Despite its location closer to the Pacific archipelago than the Asian continent and not being a member of ASEAN East Timor was admitted at the 22nd Southeast Asian Games in 2003 Hanoi Ho Chi Minh City The 2009 Southeast Asian Games was the first time Laos has ever hosted a Southeast Asian Games Laos had previously declined to host the 1965 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games citing financial difficulties Running from 9 18 December it has also commemorated the 50 years of the Southeast Asian Games held in Vientiane Laos Logo EditThe Southeast Asian Games logo was introduced during the 1959 edition in Bangkok depicting six rings that represent the six founding members and was used until the 1997 edition in Jakarta The number of rings increased to 10 during the 1999 edition in Brunei to reflect the inclusion of Singapore which was admitted into the Southeast Asian Games Federation in 1961 and Brunei Indonesia and the Philippines which joined the organization in 1977 The number of rings was again increased to 11 during the 2011 games in Indonesia to reflect the federation s newest member East Timor which was admitted in 2003 Participating NOCs EditNOC Names Formal Names Debuted IOC code Other codes used Brunei Nation of Brunei the Abode of Peace 1977 BRU BRN ISO Cambodia Kingdom of Cambodia 1961 CAM KHM 1972 1976 ISO Indonesia Republic of Indonesia 1977 INA IHO 1952 IDN FIFA ISO Laos Lao People s Democratic Republic 1959 LAO Malaysia Federation of Malaysia 1959 MAS MAL 1952 1988 MYS ISO Myanmar Republic of the Union of Myanmar 1959 MYA BIR 1948 1988 MMR ISO Philippines Republic of the Philippines 1977 PHI PHL ISO Singapore Republic of Singapore 1959 SGP SIN 1959 2016 Thailand Kingdom of Thailand 1959 THA Timor Leste Democratic Republic of Timor Leste 2003 TLS IOA 2000 Vietnam Socialist Republic of Vietnam 1959 VIE VET 1964 VNM 1968 1976 ISO Host nations and cities EditMain article List of Southeast Asian Games host cities Since the Southeast Asian Games began in 1959 it has been held in 15 cities across all Southeast Asian countries except Cambodia and East Timor 1959 1967 1975 1985 1961 1969 1965 1971 1977 1989 2001 2017 1973 1983 1993 2015 1979 1987 1997 2011 1981 1991 2005 1995 1999 2003 2021 2007 2009 2011 2013 2019 2023Location of the Southeast Asian Games host List of Southeast Asian Games Games Year Host country Opened by Date Sports Events Nations Competitors Top ranked team RefSoutheast Asian Peninsular Games1 1959 Bangkok Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 12 17 December 12 N A 6 518 Thailand THA 1 2 1961 Yangon Burma President Win Maung 11 16 December 13 N A 7 623 Burma BIR 2 1963 Awarded to Cambodia cancelled due to domestic political situation3 1965 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Yang di Pertuan Agong Ismail Nasiruddin 14 21 December 14 N A 6 963 Thailand THA 3 4 1967 Bangkok Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 9 16 December 16 N A 6 984 Thailand THA 4 5 1969 Yangon Burma Prime Minister Ne Win 6 13 December 15 N A 6 920 Burma BIR 5 6 1971 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Yang di Pertuan Agong Abdul Halim 6 13 December 15 N A 7 957 Thailand THA 6 7 1973 Singapore President Benjamin Sheares 1 8 September 16 N A 7 1632 Thailand THA 7 8 1975 Bangkok Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 9 16 December 18 N A 4 1142 Thailand THA 8 Southeast Asian Games9 1977 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Yang di Pertuan Agong Yahya Petra 19 26 November 18 N A 7 N A Indonesia INA 9 10 1979 Jakarta Indonesia President Suharto 21 30 September 18 N A 7 N A Indonesia INA 10 11 1981 Manila Philippines President Ferdinand Marcos 6 15 December 18 N A 7 1800 Indonesia INA 11 12 1983 Singapore President Devan Nair 28 May 6 June 18 N A 8 N A Indonesia INA 12 13 1985 Bangkok Thailand King Bhumibol Adulyadej 8 17 December 18 N A 8 N A Thailand THA 13 14 1987 Jakarta Indonesia President Suharto 9 20 September 26 N A 8 N A Indonesia INA 14 15 1989 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Yang di Pertuan Agong Azlan Shah 20 31 August 24 N A 9 2800 Indonesia INA 15 16 1991 Manila Philippines President Corazon Aquino 24 November 3 December 28 N A 9 N A Indonesia INA 16 17 1993 Singapore President Wee Kim Wee 12 20 June 29 N A 9 3000 Indonesia INA 17 18 1995 Chiang Mai Thailand Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn 9 17 December 28 N A 10 3262 Thailand THA 18 19 1997 Jakarta Indonesia President Suharto 11 19 October 36 490 10 5179 Indonesia INA 19 20 1999 Bandar Seri Begawan Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah 7 15 August 21 233 10 2365 Thailand THA 20 21 2001 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Yang di Pertuan Agong Salahuddin 8 17 September 32 391 10 4165 Malaysia MAS 21 22 2003 Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam Prime Minister Phan Văn Khải 5 13 December 32 442 11 5000 Vietnam VIE 22 23 2005 Manila Philippines President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo 27 November 5 December 40 443 11 5336 Philippines PHI 23 24 2007 Nakhon Ratchasima Thailand Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn 6 15 December 43 475 11 5282 Thailand THA 24 25 2009 Vientiane Laos President Choummaly Sayasone 9 18 December 29 372 11 3100 Thailand THA 25 26 2011 Jakarta and Palembang Indonesia President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono 11 22 November 44 545 11 5965 Indonesia INA 26 27 2013 Naypyidaw Myanmar Vice President Nyan Tun 11 22 December 37 460 11 4730 Thailand THA 27 28 2015 Singapore President Tony Tan 5 16 June 36 402 11 4370 Thailand THA 28 29 2017 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Yang di Pertuan Agong Muhammad V 19 30 August 38 404 11 4709 Malaysia MAS 29 30 2019 Philippines 3 President Rodrigo Duterte 30 November 11 December 56 530 11 5630 Philippines PHI 30 31 2021 Hanoi Vietnam Prime Minister Phạm Minh Chinh 12 23 May 2022 40 520 Future event32 2023 Phnom Penh Cambodia King Norodom Sihamoni expected 5 16 May Future event33 2025 Chonburi Thailand 4 King Vajiralongkorn expected 7 19 December Future event34 2027 Brunei 5 Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah expected 10 21 December Future event35 2029 Laos 6 TBD Future event The 1963 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games were canceled As the designated host Cambodia was not able to host the event due to instability in the country along with a disagreement with the International Amateur Athletic Federation The 3rd SEAP Games then passed to Laos as hosts but they begged off the 1965 event citing financial difficulties 7 Sports EditMain article Southeast Asian Games sports According to the SEAGF Charter and Rules a host nation must stage a minimum of 22 sports the two compulsory sports from Category 1 athletics and aquatics in addition to a minimum of 14 sports from Category 2 Olympics and Asian Games mandatory sports and a maximum of 8 sports from Category 3 shaded grey in the table below Each sport shall not offer more than 5 of the total medal tally except for athletics aquatics and shooting the shot was elevated for this category in 2013 For each sport and event to be included a minimum of four countries must participate in it Sports competed in the Olympic Games and Asian Games must be given priority 2 8 Sport YearsArchery 1977 1997 since 2001Arnis 1991 2005 2019Athletics AllBadminton AllBaseball 2005 2007 2011 since 2019Basketball 1979 2003 2007 since 2011Billiards and snooker Since 1991Bodybuilding 1987 1993 1997 2003 2007 2013Bowling 1977 1979 1983 2001 2005 2007 2011 since 2015Boxing AllCanoeing 1985 1995 2001 2005 2007 2011 2015 since 2019Chess 2003 2005 2011 2013 since 2019Chinlone 2013 onlyContract bridge 2011 onlyCricket 2017 onlyCycling 1959 1979 since 1983Dancesport 2005 2009 since 2019Diving Since 1965Duathlon Since 2019eSports Since 2019Equestrian 1983 1995 2001 2005 2007 2011 2017Fencing 1974 1978 since 1986Field hockey 1971 1979 1983 1987 1989 1993 2001 2007 2013 2017Figure skating Since 2017Fin swimming 2003 2009 2011Floorball 2015 2019Football AllFutsal 2007 2011 2013 2017Golf 1985 1997 2001 since 2005Gymnastics 1979 1981 1985 1997 2001 2007 2011 since 2015Handball 2005 2007Beach handball Since 2019Ice hockey Since 2017Indoor hockey Since 2017Ju jitsu Since 2019Judo 1967 1997 since 2001Karate 1985 1991 1995 1997 2001 2013 2017Kenpō 2011 2013 Sport YearsKickboxing Since 2019Kurash Since 2019Lawn bowls 1997 2001 2005 2007 Since 2017Modern pentathlon Since 2019Muay 2005 2009 2013 Since 2019Netball 2001 since 2015Obstacle racing Since 2019Paragliding 2011 onlyPencak silat 1987 1989 1993 1997 since 2001Petanque Since 2001Polo 2007 Since 2017Roller sports 2011 onlyRowing 1989 1991 1997 2001 2007 2011 2015 since 2019Rugby union 1969 1977 1979 1995 2007Rugby sevens Since 2015Sailing 1961 1967 1971 1975 1977 1983 1997 2001 2005 2007 since 2011Sambo Since 2019Sepak takraw 1967 1969 since 1973Shooting AllShort track speed skating since 2017Shuttle cock 2007 2009Skateboarding Since 2019Sport climbing 2011 onlySoftball 1981 1983 1989 2003 2005 2011 2015 since 2019Soft tennis 2011 since 2019Squash 1991 2001 2005 2007 since 2015Swimming AllSurfing Since 2019Synchronized swimming 2001 2011 since 2015Table tennis AllTaekwondo Since 1985Tennis 1959 2011 since 2015Traditional boat race 1993 1997 1999 2003 2007 2011 2015Triathlon 2005 2007 since 2015Volleyball 1959 1997 since 2001Vovinam 2011 2013Water polo 1965 2017Water skiing 1987 1997 2011 2015 2017Wakeboarding Since 2019Weightlifting 1959 1997 2001 2013 since 2017Wrestling 1987 1997 2003 2013 since 2019Wushu 1991 1993 1997 since 2001All time medal table EditCorrected after balancing the data of the Olympic Council of Asia and other archived sites which had kept the previous Southeast Asian Games medal tables Some information from the aforementioned sites are missing incorrect and or not updated 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 All time Southeast Asian Games medal table 1 RankNOCGoldSilverBronzeTotal1 Thailand THA 18851930194357582 Indonesia INA 18241703178053073 Malaysia MAS 2 13031273168542614 Philippines PHI 10671193147737375 Singapore SGP 9471002136333126 Vietnam VIE 3 92896799128867 Myanmar MYA 4 56474199222978 Cambodia CAM 5 691152584429 Laos LAO 699331948110 Brunei BRU 145516323211 East Timor TLS 362635Totals 11 NOCs 867390781099728748 1 2017 Southeast Asian Games medal counts are not yet included in these medal standings due to ongoing doping cases during those games 2 Competed as Malaya in the inaugural games until 1961 3 The Republic of Vietnam was dissolved in July 1976 when it merged with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam North Vietnam to become the Socialist Republic of Vietnam also known as Vietnam Therefore the medal counts for this country are considered to be as until 1975 In the 1989 edition a unified Vietnam rejoined the games with a new name and flag Medals won by South Vietnam are already combined here The International Olympic Committee IOC does not use codes for South Vietnam anymore after the unification with North Vietnam 4 Competed as Burma until 1987 5 Competed as Kampuchea and Khmer Republic List of multiple Southeast Asian Games medalists EditMain article List of multiple Southeast Asian Games medalists Various individuals have won multiple medals at the Games including the preceding Southeast Asian Peninsular Games As of 2019 Singaporean swimmer Joscelin Yeo has won the most Southeast Asian Games medals with 55 40 gold 12 silver 3 bronze She reached this milestone during the 2005 Games overtaking the previous record of 39 gold medals set by another Singaporean swimmer Patricia Chan Criticism EditThe games are unique in that it has no official limits to the number of sports and events to be contested and the range can be decided by the organizing host pending approval by the Southeast Asian Games Federation Aside from mandatory sports the host is free to drop or introduce other sports or events See Southeast Asian Games sports 16 This leeway has resulted in hosts maximizing their medal hauls by dropping sports disadvantageous to themselves relative to their peers and the introduction of obscure sports often at short notice thus preventing most other nations from building credible opponents 17 18 Examples of these include At the 2001 Southeast Asian Games Malaysia introduced petanque and netball At the 2003 Southeast Asian Games Vietnam added fin swimming and shuttlecock and wushu offered 28 gold medals instead of the usual 16 In the 2005 Southeast Asian Games the Philippines added arnis a demonstration sport in 2003 with six sets of medals and the Philippines bagged three gold medals 2005 also saw the addition of baseball dance sport and softball At the 2007 Southeast Asian Games Thailand added new categories of sepak takraw In addition the Thai Sepak Takraw Federation decided to replace the traditional rattan ball for a rubber ball which was uncommon in other participating countries causing a great deal of controversy and led to Malaysia boycotting the sport Consequently Thailand won all 8 events Apart from this local organizers also added futsal in this edition of the games 19 In the 2011 Southeast Asian Games Indonesia the organizers decided to cancel the team events in table tennis and reduced the number of events in shooting to 14 following the decisions made by the International Sports Federation to reduce the number of events in the World Championships At the same time bridge kenpō paragliding vovinam and wall climbing were introduced In the 2013 Southeast Asian Games Myanmar introduced its indigenous sport Chinlone The host won six of eight gold medals in the event They also introduced board games with events on Sittuyin a traditional Burmese board game and chess 20 In the 2017 Southeast Asian Games Malaysia introduced cricket indoor hockey and three winter sport events figure skating short track speed skating and ice hockey 21 In the 2019 Southeast Asian Games the Philippines added beach handball duathlon e sports jiu jitsu kickboxing kurash sambo skateboarding surfing and wakeboarding Certain events in Modern Pentathlon were made in non Olympic formats See also EditEvents of the OCA Continental Asian Games Asian Winter Games Asian Youth Games Asian Beach Games Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games Events of the OCA Subregional Central Asian Games East Asian Games now East Asian Youth Games South Asian Games West Asian Games Events of the APC Continental Asian Para Games Asian Youth Para Games Events of the APC Subregional ASEAN Para GamesReferences Edit Games page of the website of the Olympic Council of Asia retrieved 2010 07 09 a b South East Asian Games Federation Charter and Rules PDF SEAGF 30 May 2010 Retrieved 30 December 2015 The 2019 Southeast Asian Games is the first officially decentralized games While games were held in various cities mostly in the Clark Metro Manila and the Subic Bay areas there is no designated host city for this edition alternately known as Philippines 2019 SEA Games Federation Council confirms host countries Retrieved 19 November 2020 SEA Games Federation Council confirms host countries Retrieved 19 November 2020 SEA Games Federation Council confirms host countries Retrieved 19 November 2020 History of the SEA Games www olympic org my Archived from the original on 17 December 2004 Retrieved 26 February 2013 Ian De Cotta 5 June 2015 A cool addition to the SEA Games Today Online Retrieved 5 June 2015 South East Asian Games Medal Count Retrieved 31 August 2017 SEAP Games Federation Medal Tally 1959 1995 Medal Tally History of the SEA Games SEA Games previous medal table SEA Games members Pattharapong Rattanasevee 21 July 2017 Southeast Asian Games yet to win gold for sporting spirit South China Morning Post Sea Games morphing into a monster cum circus Sea Games reduced to a carnival Sports VietNamNet SEA Games or a village festival SEA Games or a village festival English vietnamnet vn Retrieved 2 June 2011 HS Manjunath 10 December 2013 Cambodia eye record medal haul The Phnom Penh Post Retrieved 13 December 2013 4 new sports we can now watch in 2017 SEA Games Red Bull Retrieved 29 August 2017 External links EditOlympic Council of Asia Regional Hosting List SEA Games Federation Medal Tally 1959 1995 Medal Tally History of the SEA Games SEA Games previous medal table SEA Games members Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Southeast Asian Games amp oldid 1053618427, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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