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Saccopastore skulls

Two fossil crania were discovered along the Aniene River Valley of Northern Rome, Italy in 1929 and 1935. The two human skulls that derive from Homo neanderthalensis were located in a quarry along the Aniene River in gravel and sand beds that have since been replaced by building areas with the city. From geomorphological classification, the two skulls were assigned to the Tyrrhenian stage due to their location within a small hill approximately 5 meters above the river. The area in which they were found at the time was called Saccopastore, which is where these two crania get their name. The first Saccopastore skull, discovered by Sergio Sergi, and the second Saccopastore skull, discovered by Professors Breuil and Alberto Carlo Blanc, both show greater basicranial flexion compared to those of the Wurmian Neandertals, due to the extreme inclination of the planum sphenoidalis. The skulls' ages likely ranges from 100,000 to 300,000 years, and they show an extremely high level of fossilisation. After being discovered, the skulls were kept at the Institute of Anthropology of the University of Rome until World War II, when they were taken by Professor Sergio Sergi to be preserved and kept safe from German officers who were seeking fossil treasures. After a time, they stayed with Sergi and became part of his own private collection.

Cast of Saccopastore 1 skull at the National Museum of Natural History

In 2015, the fossils were re-dated and found to be much earlier than previously thought. The new study concluded that the fossils should be dated to around 250,000 years ago, pushing back their age by over 100,000 years and thus surpassing Altamura Man as the earliest evidence for Neanderthals in Italy. The new study was a collaborative effort conducted by geologists from the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology working in collaboration with anthropologists and paleontologists from Sapienza University and the University of Wisconsin. This new dating is in line with the perceived age of the eleven stone artifacts found alongside the Saccopastore fossils, which were thought to have been older than the previously assessed date for the fossils.

Contents

In April of 1929, workmen of the quarry located near the Aniene River discovered a human cranium that looked to be fossilized. The skull was immediately delivered to Sergio Sergi, who began a long series of studies on the fossil. The Saccopastore skull was labeled a mature female. It is almost completely intact and overall shows a high degree of mineralization, even though it is missing both of the zygomatic arches and the mandible. After being discovered, the skull had taken damage by the workmen within the quarry. This included a number of dental crowns being broken and lost, along with some other damage to the supraorbital area and two holes punctured into the frontal and parietal areas of the vault.

In the summer of 1935, A.C. Blanc and H. Breuil discovered another, less complete cranium in the same area where the first skull was found in 1925. The second Saccopastore skull is identified as a male and is lacking the entire vault, along with the left front orbital areas, and part of the base. Morphological differences between the two skulls are the result of sexual dimorphism because one is a mature female, and the other is a young adult male. The skull has a cranial capacity estimated around 1,280 and 1,300 ml, and the facial size is smaller than that of a Wurmian Neandertal's, but larger than the first Saccopastore skull.

  1. Manzi, Giorgio (2001). "CT-scanning and virtual reproduction of the Saccopastore Neandertal crania". Rivista di Anthropologia. 79: 61–72.
  2. "Skulls not ours to keep by Phillip Tobias Daily News". accuca.conectia.es. Retrieved2020-05-22.
  3. "Italy's first Neanderthal dates back 250,000 years". The Local. 4 Nov 2015. Retrieved5 November 2015.
  4. Bruner, Emiliano; Manzi, Giorgio (2008-06-01). "Paleoneurology of an "early" Neandertal: endocranial size, shape, and features of Saccopastore 1". Journal of Human Evolution. 54 (6): 729–742. doi:10.1016/j.jhevol.2007.08.014. ISSN 0047-2484. PMID 18178238.
  5. Marra, Fabrizio; Ceruleo, Piero; Jicha, Brian; Pandolfi, Luca; Petronio, Carmelo; Salari, Leonardo (2015-12-01). "A new age within MIS 7 for the Homo neanderthalensis of Saccopastore in the glacio-eustatically forced sedimentary successions of the Aniene River Valley, Rome". Quaternary Science Reviews. 129: 260–274. Bibcode:2015QSRv..129..260M. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2015.10.027. ISSN 0277-3791.
Wikimedia Commons has media related toSaccopastore 1.



Saccopastore skulls
Saccopastore skulls Language Watch Edit Two fossil crania were discovered along the Aniene River Valley of Northern Rome Italy in 1929 and 1935 The two human skulls that derive from Homo neanderthalensis were located in a quarry along the Aniene River in gravel and sand beds that have since been replaced by building areas with the city From geomorphological classification the two skulls were assigned to the Tyrrhenian stage due to their location within a small hill approximately 5 meters above the river The area in which they were found at the time was called Saccopastore which is where these two crania get their name The first Saccopastore skull discovered by Sergio Sergi and the second Saccopastore skull discovered by Professors Breuil and Alberto Carlo Blanc both show greater basicranial flexion compared to those of the Wurmian Neandertals due to the extreme inclination of the planum sphenoidalis The skulls ages likely ranges from 100 000 to 300 000 years and they show an extremely high level of fossilisation 1 After being discovered the skulls were kept at the Institute of Anthropology of the University of Rome until World War II when they were taken by Professor Sergio Sergi to be preserved and kept safe from German officers who were seeking fossil treasures After a time they stayed with Sergi and became part of his own private collection 2 Cast of Saccopastore 1 skull at the National Museum of Natural History In 2015 the fossils were re dated and found to be much earlier than previously thought 3 The new study concluded that the fossils should be dated to around 250 000 years ago pushing back their age by over 100 000 years and thus surpassing Altamura Man as the earliest evidence for Neanderthals in Italy 3 The new study was a collaborative effort conducted by geologists from the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology working in collaboration with anthropologists and paleontologists from Sapienza University and the University of Wisconsin 3 This new dating is in line with the perceived age of the eleven stone artifacts found alongside the Saccopastore fossils which were thought to have been older than the previously assessed date for the fossils 3 Contents 1 Saccopastore 1 2 Saccopastore 2 3 References 4 External linksSaccopastore 1 EditIn April of 1929 workmen of the quarry located near the Aniene River discovered a human cranium that looked to be fossilized The skull was immediately delivered to Sergio Sergi who began a long series of studies on the fossil The Saccopastore skull was labeled a mature female It is almost completely intact and overall shows a high degree of mineralization even though it is missing both of the zygomatic arches and the mandible After being discovered the skull had taken damage by the workmen within the quarry This included a number of dental crowns being broken and lost along with some other damage to the supraorbital area and two holes punctured into the frontal and parietal areas of the vault 4 Saccopastore 2 EditIn the summer of 1935 A C Blanc and H Breuil discovered another less complete cranium in the same area where the first skull was found in 1925 The second Saccopastore skull is identified as a male and is lacking the entire vault along with the left front orbital areas and part of the base 5 Morphological differences between the two skulls are the result of sexual dimorphism because one is a mature female and the other is a young adult male The skull has a cranial capacity estimated around 1 280 and 1 300 ml and the facial size is smaller than that of a Wurmian Neandertal s but larger than the first Saccopastore skull 4 References Edit Manzi Giorgio 2001 CT scanning and virtual reproduction of the Saccopastore Neandertal crania Rivista di Anthropologia 79 61 72 Skulls not ours to keep by Phillip Tobias Daily News accuca conectia es Retrieved 2020 05 22 a b c d Italy s first Neanderthal dates back 250 000 years The Local 4 Nov 2015 Retrieved 5 November 2015 a b Bruner Emiliano Manzi Giorgio 2008 06 01 Paleoneurology of an early Neandertal endocranial size shape and features of Saccopastore 1 Journal of Human Evolution 54 6 729 742 doi 10 1016 j jhevol 2007 08 014 ISSN 0047 2484 PMID 18178238 Marra Fabrizio Ceruleo Piero Jicha Brian Pandolfi Luca Petronio Carmelo Salari Leonardo 2015 12 01 A new age within MIS 7 for the Homo neanderthalensis of Saccopastore in the glacio eustatically forced sedimentary successions of the Aniene River Valley Rome Quaternary Science Reviews 129 260 274 Bibcode 2015QSRv 129 260M doi 10 1016 j quascirev 2015 10 027 ISSN 0277 3791 External links EditWikimedia Commons has media related to Saccopastore 1 Museum of Anthropology Giuseppe Sergi Rome This prehistoric hominin related article is a stub You can help Wikipedia by expanding it vte Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Saccopastore skulls amp oldid 1030415289, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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