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Sacramento Valley

For the Arizona valley, see Sacramento Valley (Arizona).
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The Sacramento Valley is the area of the Central Valley of the U.S. state of California that lies north of the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta and is drained by the Sacramento River. It encompasses all or parts of ten Northern California counties. Although many areas of the Sacramento Valley are rural, it contains several urban areas, including the state capital, Sacramento.

Sacramento Valley
Sacramento
The Central Valley of California
Naming
Native nameSpanish: Valle de Sacramento
Geography
LocationCalifornia, United States
Population centersRedding, Chico, Yuba City, Sacramento
Borders onSierra Nevada (east), Cascade Range, Klamath Mountains (north), Coast Range (west), Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta (south)
Coordinates39°00′N121°30′W /39°N 121.5°W /39; -121.5Coordinates: 39°00′N121°30′W /39°N 121.5°W /39; -121.5
RiversSacramento River

Contents

Gabriel Moraga named the Sacramento River in 1808. The name was later expanded to the Sacramento Valley and City of Sacramento.

The Sacramento River and its tributaries are a significant part of the geography of the Sacramento Valley. Rising in the various mountain ranges (the various Northern Coast Ranges to the west, the southern Siskiyou Mountains to the north, and the northern Sierra Nevada to the east) that define the shape of the valley, they provide water for agricultural, industrial, residential, and recreation uses. Most of the rivers are heavily dammed and diverted.

19th century etching depicting the Sutter Buttes in the Sacramento Valley

The terrain of the Sacramento Valley is primarily flat grasslands that become lusher as one moves east from the rain shadow of the Coast Ranges toward the Sierra. Unlike the San Joaquin Valley, which in its pre-irrigation state was a vegetation-hostile desert, the somewhat less arid Sacramento Valley had significant tracts of forest prior to the arrival of settlers of European ancestry. Most of it was cut down during the California Gold Rush and the ensuing wave of American settlement, although there are still some heavily tree-populated areas, such as the greater Sacramento area.

Foothills become more common from just south of Corning to Shasta Lake City. These are known as the Valley Hills and begin south of the Tehama-Glenn County line near Corning. There are also a few hills in Red Bluff and Corning. There is one major range of foothills between Cottonwood and Red Bluff known as the Cottonwood Hills (a.k.a. 9-mile Hill), and there is the Cottonwood Ridge between Anderson and Cottonwood. There are some hills in Redding, a few more than Red Bluff, and after Redding it is mainly foothills.

One distinctive geographic feature of the Sacramento Valley is the Sutter Buttes. Nicknamed the smallest mountain range in the world, it consists of the remnants of an extinct volcano and is located just outside Yuba City, 44 miles north of Sacramento.

The Sacramento River watershed, including the valley and adjacent highlands.

Citrus and nut orchards and cattle ranches are common to both halves of the Central Valley. The Sacramento Valley's agricultural industry also resembles that of the San Joaquin Valley to the south. Nuts, such as almonds and walnuts, are of greater importance north of the Delta, and rice, nonviable in the drier San Joaquin Valley, is a major crop. The town of Corning produces olives for oil extraction and for consumption as fruit. The Sunsweet Growers Incorporated headquarters are in Yuba City. The valley controls more than two-thirds of the worldwide prune market through the over 400 growers in California.

Weather patterns in the Sacramento Valley are very similar to those in the San Joaquin Valley to the south, although the humidity and precipitation tend to be a bit higher. Summers are the dry season, with average daytime temperatures in the low to high 90s but triple digits are a common occurrence, especially in Chico, Redding, Red Bluff, and Sacramento. The "breeze", which comes in from the Bay area, brings cooler temperatures and higher humidity. At times the delta breeze is gusty with wind speed to up to 30 mph in the valley and up to 45 mph in the delta region which is often breezy. This breeze can also bring morning low clouds at times into the region, but the clouds generally burn off quickly and temperatures stay cool. Summer-like conditions continue into early to mid-September but weather starts to change to cooler, wetter, foggier weather during October which gives trees vibrant autumn foliage. Winters, also known as the rainy season, are generally mild to cool, foggy and wet. Up north, the temperature averages in the mid-40s °F and lows reaching to the low-10s °F, colder in the northern part of the valley and colder still in the foothills and frost can occur almost anywhere. Farther south near Sacramento, temperatures tend to stay between the low-50s and high-60s °F, with nighttime temperatures dropping to the mid-30s and 40s °F. The rainy season runs from November to early-April. During the rainy season, the Sacramento Valley is prone to strong thunderstorms and tornadoes, mostly of EF0 or EF1 intensity, especially in Colusa County and areas around Corning and Orland. Flooding does occur at times during wetter periods, usually November to March. Snow in the valley is rare, although Redding and Red Bluff, being at the north end of the valley, often experience a light dusting or two per year. Chico may get a rain-snow mix every few years, but, on the average, only snows about every 5 years. Farther south in Sacramento, snow doesn't occur. During the autumn and winter months, the entire Central Valley is susceptible to dense tule fog that makes driving hazardous, especially at night and especially south of Corning. The fog can last for weeks depending on how weak the wind is.

Climate data for Sacramento, California (Sacramento Executive Airport), 1991–2020 normals, extremes 1941–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 76
(24)
78
(26)
88
(31)
95
(35)
105
(41)
115
(46)
114
(46)
112
(44)
109
(43)
104
(40)
87
(31)
74
(23)
115
(46)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 65.2
(18.4)
71.1
(21.7)
78.1
(25.6)
87.4
(30.8)
95.3
(35.2)
103.1
(39.5)
105.3
(40.7)
104.1
(40.1)
100.6
(38.1)
91.8
(33.2)
76.5
(24.7)
65.1
(18.4)
107.0
(41.7)
Average high °F (°C) 56.0
(13.3)
61.3
(16.3)
66.3
(19.1)
72.1
(22.3)
80.3
(26.8)
87.9
(31.1)
92.6
(33.7)
91.9
(33.3)
88.5
(31.4)
78.8
(26.0)
65.0
(18.3)
56.0
(13.3)
74.7
(23.7)
Daily mean °F (°C) 47.6
(8.7)
51.4
(10.8)
55.4
(13.0)
59.5
(15.3)
66.1
(18.9)
72.2
(22.3)
75.9
(24.4)
75.3
(24.1)
72.5
(22.5)
64.5
(18.1)
53.9
(12.2)
47.3
(8.5)
61.8
(16.6)
Average low °F (°C) 39.2
(4.0)
41.5
(5.3)
44.5
(6.9)
47.0
(8.3)
52.0
(11.1)
56.5
(13.6)
59.2
(15.1)
58.8
(14.9)
56.5
(13.6)
50.3
(10.2)
42.7
(5.9)
38.5
(3.6)
48.9
(9.4)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 29.1
(−1.6)
31.7
(−0.2)
35.1
(1.7)
37.9
(3.3)
44.1
(6.7)
49.5
(9.7)
54.1
(12.3)
53.8
(12.1)
49.6
(9.8)
41.7
(5.4)
32.7
(0.4)
28.7
(−1.8)
26.9
(−2.8)
Record low °F (°C) 20
(−7)
23
(−5)
26
(−3)
31
(−1)
34
(1)
41
(5)
48
(9)
48
(9)
42
(6)
35
(2)
26
(−3)
18
(−8)
18
(−8)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.66
(93)
3.49
(89)
2.68
(68)
1.26
(32)
0.75
(19)
0.23
(5.8)
trace 0.04
(1.0)
0.09
(2.3)
0.85
(22)
1.66
(42)
3.43
(87)
18.14
(461)
Average precipitation days(≥ 0.01 in) 10.0 9.1 9.0 5.1 3.6 1.1 0.1 0.2 0.7 3.1 6.1 9.6 57.7
Average relative humidity (%) 83.3 76.8 71.6 64.5 58.9 55.0 53.2 55.7 57.0 63.1 75.6 82.9 66.5
Average dew point °F (°C) 39.4
(4.1)
42.1
(5.6)
42.8
(6.0)
43.7
(6.5)
46.9
(8.3)
50.4
(10.2)
53.1
(11.7)
53.4
(11.9)
50.9
(10.5)
47.5
(8.6)
43.7
(6.5)
39.2
(4.0)
46.1
(7.8)
Mean monthly sunshine hours 145.5 201.3 278.0 329.6 406.3 419.5 440.2 406.9 347.8 296.7 194.9 141.1 3,607.8
Percent possible sunshine 48 67 75 83 92 94 98 96 93 86 64 48 81
Source: NOAA (relative humidity, dew point and sun 1961–1990)
Climate data for Sacramento 5 ESE, California (Sacramento State), 1991–2020 normals, extremes 1877–present
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 79
(26)
80
(27)
90
(32)
98
(37)
107
(42)
112
(44)
114
(46)
112
(44)
109
(43)
102
(39)
86
(30)
72
(22)
114
(46)
Mean maximum °F (°C) 66.4
(19.1)
72.5
(22.5)
80.6
(27.0)
89.5
(31.9)
97.1
(36.2)
104.4
(40.2)
106.7
(41.5)
105.5
(40.8)
102.0
(38.9)
92.3
(33.5)
77.3
(25.2)
65.9
(18.8)
108.1
(42.3)
Average high °F (°C) 56.5
(13.6)
62.2
(16.8)
67.8
(19.9)
73.5
(23.1)
81.3
(27.4)
89.0
(31.7)
94.4
(34.7)
93.5
(34.2)
89.3
(31.8)
78.9
(26.1)
65.3
(18.5)
56.4
(13.6)
75.7
(24.3)
Daily mean °F (°C) 48.8
(9.3)
52.9
(11.6)
57.2
(14.0)
61.4
(16.3)
67.7
(19.8)
73.9
(23.3)
77.9
(25.5)
77.3
(25.2)
74.0
(23.3)
65.9
(18.8)
55.3
(12.9)
48.5
(9.2)
63.4
(17.4)
Average low °F (°C) 41.1
(5.1)
43.7
(6.5)
46.7
(8.2)
49.3
(9.6)
54.0
(12.2)
58.7
(14.8)
61.4
(16.3)
61.0
(16.1)
58.8
(14.9)
52.9
(11.6)
45.3
(7.4)
40.7
(4.8)
51.1
(10.6)
Mean minimum °F (°C) 32.5
(0.3)
35.4
(1.9)
38.8
(3.8)
41.6
(5.3)
47.2
(8.4)
51.9
(11.1)
55.9
(13.3)
55.9
(13.3)
52.4
(11.3)
45.1
(7.3)
36.2
(2.3)
31.9
(−0.1)
30.5
(−0.8)
Record low °F (°C) 19
(−7)
21
(−6)
29
(−2)
34
(1)
37
(3)
43
(6)
47
(8)
48
(9)
44
(7)
34
(1)
27
(−3)
17
(−8)
17
(−8)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.87
(98)
3.63
(92)
2.82
(72)
1.44
(37)
0.86
(22)
0.21
(5.3)
trace 0.02
(0.51)
0.15
(3.8)
0.93
(24)
1.78
(45)
3.49
(89)
19.20
(488)
Average precipitation days(≥ 0.01 in) 10.8 9.6 9.2 5.3 3.7 1.2 0.1 0.2 0.8 3.1 6.8 10.1 60.9
Source: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center
Climate data for Chico, California (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 77
(25)
82
(28)
93
(34)
98
(37)
108
(42)
115
(46)
117
(47)
116
(47)
114
(46)
107
(42)
91
(33)
78
(26)
117
(47)
Average high °F (°C) 55.1
(12.8)
61.1
(16.2)
66.3
(19.1)
72.6
(22.6)
81.3
(27.4)
88.7
(31.5)
94.2
(34.6)
93.7
(34.3)
89.7
(32.1)
79.4
(26.3)
64.8
(18.2)
55.6
(13.1)
75.3
(24.1)
Average low °F (°C) 35.4
(1.9)
38.3
(3.5)
41.5
(5.3)
45.2
(7.3)
51.9
(11.1)
56.7
(13.7)
60.5
(15.8)
58.3
(14.6)
54.6
(12.6)
46.9
(8.3)
39.9
(4.4)
35.3
(1.8)
47.1
(8.4)
Record low °F (°C) 12
(−11)
16
(−9)
23
(−5)
27
(−3)
30
(−1)
38
(3)
40
(4)
38
(3)
35
(2)
23
(−5)
20
(−7)
11
(−12)
11
(−12)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 4.86
(123)
4.42
(112)
4.29
(109)
1.75
(44)
1.04
(26)
.48
(12)
.02
(0.51)
.08
(2.0)
.42
(11)
1.42
(36)
3.28
(83)
4.61
(117)
26.67
(677)
Source: Western Regional Climate Center
Climate data for Redding, California (1961–1990)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 57.3
(14.1)
61.3
(16.3)
62.5
(16.9)
69.9
(21.1)
80.5
(26.9)
90.4
(32.4)
98.3
(36.8)
95.7
(35.4)
89.3
(31.8)
77.6
(25.3)
62.1
(16.7)
54.7
(12.6)
74.8
(23.8)
Daily mean °F (°C) 45.5
(7.5)
50.7
(10.4)
52.5
(11.4)
58
(14)
66.4
(19.1)
76.1
(24.5)
81.5
(27.5)
79.5
(26.4)
74.1
(23.4)
63.5
(17.5)
51.8
(11.0)
45
(7)
62
(17)
Average low °F (°C) 35.7
(2.1)
40
(4)
41.7
(5.4)
46
(8)
52.3
(11.3)
61.8
(16.6)
64.7
(18.2)
63.1
(17.3)
58.8
(14.9)
49.2
(9.6)
41.4
(5.2)
35.2
(1.8)
49.2
(9.6)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 6.06
(154)
4.45
(113)
4.38
(111)
2.08
(53)
1.27
(32)
0.56
(14)
0.17
(4.3)
0.46
(12)
0.91
(23)
2.24
(57)
5.21
(132)
5.51
(140)
33.3
(850)
Average precipitation days 13.1 8.7 12.3 7.9 7.2 4.0 0.6 0.9 2.1 4.1 6.8 10.2 77.9
Mean monthly sunshine hours 226 256 312 351 395 423 451 421 338 314 251 204 3,942
Source:

Interstate 5 is the primary route through the Sacramento Valley, traveling north–south roughly along the valley's western edge. Interstate 80 cuts a northeast-to-southwest swath through the southern end of the valley, mostly through Sacramento and Yolo Counties, and ends at the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Several secondary routes connect the two roads, including Interstate 505 and State Route 113. The Sacramento area has a web of urban freeways.

Other principal routes in the region include State Route 99, which runs along the valley's eastern edge, roughly parallel to I-5, from Sacramento until its northern terminus in Red Bluff; State Route 20, which traverses the valley from west to east on its route from State Route 1 in Mendocino County to the Donner Pass; State Route 49, named in honor of the California Gold Rush and running through many old mining towns in the foothills of the valley; and State Route 45, which runs along the course of the Sacramento River roughly ten miles (20 km) east of I-5.

The Union Pacific Railroad serves the valley, with its principal north–south line from Oakland, California to Portland, Oregon, via Sacramento, Marysville, Chico, and Redding. This is also the route of Amtrak's Coast Starlight passenger train. The Union Pacific also has two east–west lines, through Donner Pass (the former Central Pacific Railroad), and through the Feather River gorge (the former Western Pacific Railroad). Amtrak's California Zephyr uses the Donner Pass route. The BNSF Railway has a line from Klamath Falls, Oregon, to a junction with the Union Pacific Feather River line at Keddie. The BNSF has trackage rights on both the UP east–west routes. In addition, the California Northern Railroad operates the former Southern Pacific Railroad line on the west side of the valley from Davis to Tehama (near Red Bluff).

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  1. Official records for Sacramento were kept exclusively at the airport since 10 November 1941.
  1. Diaz, Manuel (1840). Diseño del Valle de Sacramento (Map).
  2. "Sunsweet Growers Inc". Careers in food. Archived from the original on 2011-09-30. Retrieved2011-11-13.
  3. ThreadEx
  4. "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved2021-10-14.
  5. "Summary of Monthly Normals SACRAMENTO EXECUTIVE AP, CA US 1991-2020". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved2021-10-14.
  6. "WMO Climate Normals for SACRAMENTO/EXECUTIVE ARPT CA 1961–1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved2020-07-19.
  7. Reese, Phillip (January 7, 2015). "2014 was hottest year in Sacramento's history". Sacramento Bee.
  8. "Summary of Monthly Normals SACRAMENTO 5 ESE, CA US 1991-2020". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved2021-10-14.
  9. "Global Summary of the Month". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved2021-10-14.
  10. "SACRAMENTO 5 ESE, CALIFORNIA". Western Regional Climate Center.
  11. "CHICO EXPERIMENT STN, CALIFORNIA". Western Regional Climate Center. RetrievedOctober 24, 2012.
  12. "Average Weather for Redding, CA - Temperature and Precipitation". Retrieved31 December 2009.
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Sacramento Valley
Sacramento Valley Language Watch Edit For the Arizona valley see Sacramento Valley Arizona This article needs additional citations for verification Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources Unsourced material may be challenged and removed Find sources Sacramento Valley news newspapers books scholar JSTOR December 2008 Learn how and when to remove this template message The Sacramento Valley is the area of the Central Valley of the U S state of California that lies north of the Sacramento San Joaquin River Delta and is drained by the Sacramento River It encompasses all or parts of ten Northern California counties Although many areas of the Sacramento Valley are rural it contains several urban areas including the state capital Sacramento Sacramento ValleySacramentoThe Central Valley of CaliforniaNamingNative nameSpanish Valle de Sacramento 1 GeographyLocationCalifornia United StatesPopulation centersRedding Chico Yuba City SacramentoBorders onSierra Nevada east Cascade Range Klamath Mountains north Coast Range west Sacramento San Joaquin River Delta south Coordinates39 00 N 121 30 W 39 N 121 5 W 39 121 5 Coordinates 39 00 N 121 30 W 39 N 121 5 W 39 121 5 RiversSacramento River Contents 1 Geography 2 Agriculture 3 Climate 4 Transportation 5 Educational institutions 6 Professional sports teams 6 1 National Basketball Association NBA 6 2 Pacific Coast League minor league baseball 6 3 Independent Women s Football League 6 4 Women s Premier Soccer League 6 5 United Soccer League USL 7 Cities 7 1 Cities with over 500 000 inhabitants 7 2 Cities with 100 000 to 400 000 inhabitants 7 3 Cities with 50 000 to 100 000 inhabitants 7 4 Cities with 10 000 to 50 000 inhabitants 7 5 Cities with under 10 000 inhabitants 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksGeography Edit Gabriel Moraga named the Sacramento River in 1808 The name was later expanded to the Sacramento Valley and City of Sacramento The Sacramento River and its tributaries are a significant part of the geography of the Sacramento Valley Rising in the various mountain ranges the various Northern Coast Ranges to the west the southern Siskiyou Mountains to the north and the northern Sierra Nevada to the east that define the shape of the valley they provide water for agricultural industrial residential and recreation uses Most of the rivers are heavily dammed and diverted 19th century etching depicting the Sutter Buttes in the Sacramento Valley The terrain of the Sacramento Valley is primarily flat grasslands that become lusher as one moves east from the rain shadow of the Coast Ranges toward the Sierra Unlike the San Joaquin Valley which in its pre irrigation state was a vegetation hostile desert the somewhat less arid Sacramento Valley had significant tracts of forest prior to the arrival of settlers of European ancestry Most of it was cut down during the California Gold Rush and the ensuing wave of American settlement although there are still some heavily tree populated areas such as the greater Sacramento area Foothills become more common from just south of Corning to Shasta Lake City These are known as the Valley Hills and begin south of the Tehama Glenn County line near Corning There are also a few hills in Red Bluff and Corning There is one major range of foothills between Cottonwood and Red Bluff known as the Cottonwood Hills a k a 9 mile Hill and there is the Cottonwood Ridge between Anderson and Cottonwood There are some hills in Redding a few more than Red Bluff and after Redding it is mainly foothills One distinctive geographic feature of the Sacramento Valley is the Sutter Buttes Nicknamed the smallest mountain range in the world it consists of the remnants of an extinct volcano and is located just outside Yuba City 44 miles north of Sacramento Agriculture Edit The Sacramento River watershed including the valley and adjacent highlands Citrus and nut orchards and cattle ranches are common to both halves of the Central Valley The Sacramento Valley s agricultural industry also resembles that of the San Joaquin Valley to the south Nuts such as almonds and walnuts are of greater importance north of the Delta and rice nonviable in the drier San Joaquin Valley is a major crop The town of Corning produces olives for oil extraction and for consumption as fruit The Sunsweet Growers Incorporated headquarters are in Yuba City The valley controls more than two thirds of the worldwide prune market through the over 400 growers in California 2 Climate EditWeather patterns in the Sacramento Valley are very similar to those in the San Joaquin Valley to the south although the humidity and precipitation tend to be a bit higher Summers are the dry season with average daytime temperatures in the low to high 90s but triple digits are a common occurrence especially in Chico Redding Red Bluff and Sacramento The breeze which comes in from the Bay area brings cooler temperatures and higher humidity At times the delta breeze is gusty with wind speed to up to 30 mph in the valley and up to 45 mph in the delta region which is often breezy This breeze can also bring morning low clouds at times into the region but the clouds generally burn off quickly and temperatures stay cool Summer like conditions continue into early to mid September but weather starts to change to cooler wetter foggier weather during October which gives trees vibrant autumn foliage Winters also known as the rainy season are generally mild to cool foggy and wet Up north the temperature averages in the mid 40s F and lows reaching to the low 10s F colder in the northern part of the valley and colder still in the foothills and frost can occur almost anywhere Farther south near Sacramento temperatures tend to stay between the low 50s and high 60s F with nighttime temperatures dropping to the mid 30s and 40s F The rainy season runs from November to early April During the rainy season the Sacramento Valley is prone to strong thunderstorms and tornadoes mostly of EF0 or EF1 intensity especially in Colusa County and areas around Corning and Orland Flooding does occur at times during wetter periods usually November to March Snow in the valley is rare although Redding and Red Bluff being at the north end of the valley often experience a light dusting or two per year Chico may get a rain snow mix every few years but on the average only snows about every 5 years Farther south in Sacramento snow doesn t occur During the autumn and winter months the entire Central Valley is susceptible to dense tule fog that makes driving hazardous especially at night and especially south of Corning The fog can last for weeks depending on how weak the wind is Climate data for Sacramento California Sacramento Executive Airport 1991 2020 normals extremes 1941 present a Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec YearRecord high F C 76 24 78 26 88 31 95 35 105 41 115 46 114 46 112 44 109 43 104 40 87 31 74 23 115 46 Mean maximum F C 65 2 18 4 71 1 21 7 78 1 25 6 87 4 30 8 95 3 35 2 103 1 39 5 105 3 40 7 104 1 40 1 100 6 38 1 91 8 33 2 76 5 24 7 65 1 18 4 107 0 41 7 Average high F C 56 0 13 3 61 3 16 3 66 3 19 1 72 1 22 3 80 3 26 8 87 9 31 1 92 6 33 7 91 9 33 3 88 5 31 4 78 8 26 0 65 0 18 3 56 0 13 3 74 7 23 7 Daily mean F C 47 6 8 7 51 4 10 8 55 4 13 0 59 5 15 3 66 1 18 9 72 2 22 3 75 9 24 4 75 3 24 1 72 5 22 5 64 5 18 1 53 9 12 2 47 3 8 5 61 8 16 6 Average low F C 39 2 4 0 41 5 5 3 44 5 6 9 47 0 8 3 52 0 11 1 56 5 13 6 59 2 15 1 58 8 14 9 56 5 13 6 50 3 10 2 42 7 5 9 38 5 3 6 48 9 9 4 Mean minimum F C 29 1 1 6 31 7 0 2 35 1 1 7 37 9 3 3 44 1 6 7 49 5 9 7 54 1 12 3 53 8 12 1 49 6 9 8 41 7 5 4 32 7 0 4 28 7 1 8 26 9 2 8 Record low F C 20 7 23 5 26 3 31 1 34 1 41 5 48 9 48 9 42 6 35 2 26 3 18 8 18 8 Average precipitation inches mm 3 66 93 3 49 89 2 68 68 1 26 32 0 75 19 0 23 5 8 trace 0 04 1 0 0 09 2 3 0 85 22 1 66 42 3 43 87 18 14 461 Average precipitation days 0 01 in 10 0 9 1 9 0 5 1 3 6 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 7 3 1 6 1 9 6 57 7Average relative humidity 83 3 76 8 71 6 64 5 58 9 55 0 53 2 55 7 57 0 63 1 75 6 82 9 66 5Average dew point F C 39 4 4 1 42 1 5 6 42 8 6 0 43 7 6 5 46 9 8 3 50 4 10 2 53 1 11 7 53 4 11 9 50 9 10 5 47 5 8 6 43 7 6 5 39 2 4 0 46 1 7 8 Mean monthly sunshine hours 145 5 201 3 278 0 329 6 406 3 419 5 440 2 406 9 347 8 296 7 194 9 141 1 3 607 8Percent possible sunshine 48 67 75 83 92 94 98 96 93 86 64 48 81Source NOAA relative humidity dew point and sun 1961 1990 4 5 6 Climate data for Sacramento 5 ESE California Sacramento State 7 1991 2020 normals extremes 1877 presentMonth Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec YearRecord high F C 79 26 80 27 90 32 98 37 107 42 112 44 114 46 112 44 109 43 102 39 86 30 72 22 114 46 Mean maximum F C 66 4 19 1 72 5 22 5 80 6 27 0 89 5 31 9 97 1 36 2 104 4 40 2 106 7 41 5 105 5 40 8 102 0 38 9 92 3 33 5 77 3 25 2 65 9 18 8 108 1 42 3 Average high F C 56 5 13 6 62 2 16 8 67 8 19 9 73 5 23 1 81 3 27 4 89 0 31 7 94 4 34 7 93 5 34 2 89 3 31 8 78 9 26 1 65 3 18 5 56 4 13 6 75 7 24 3 Daily mean F C 48 8 9 3 52 9 11 6 57 2 14 0 61 4 16 3 67 7 19 8 73 9 23 3 77 9 25 5 77 3 25 2 74 0 23 3 65 9 18 8 55 3 12 9 48 5 9 2 63 4 17 4 Average low F C 41 1 5 1 43 7 6 5 46 7 8 2 49 3 9 6 54 0 12 2 58 7 14 8 61 4 16 3 61 0 16 1 58 8 14 9 52 9 11 6 45 3 7 4 40 7 4 8 51 1 10 6 Mean minimum F C 32 5 0 3 35 4 1 9 38 8 3 8 41 6 5 3 47 2 8 4 51 9 11 1 55 9 13 3 55 9 13 3 52 4 11 3 45 1 7 3 36 2 2 3 31 9 0 1 30 5 0 8 Record low F C 19 7 21 6 29 2 34 1 37 3 43 6 47 8 48 9 44 7 34 1 27 3 17 8 17 8 Average precipitation inches mm 3 87 98 3 63 92 2 82 72 1 44 37 0 86 22 0 21 5 3 trace 0 02 0 51 0 15 3 8 0 93 24 1 78 45 3 49 89 19 20 488 Average precipitation days 0 01 in 10 8 9 6 9 2 5 3 3 7 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 8 3 1 6 8 10 1 60 9Source NOAA 4 8 9 Western Regional Climate Center 10 Climate data for Chico California 1981 2010 normals Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec YearRecord high F C 77 25 82 28 93 34 98 37 108 42 115 46 117 47 116 47 114 46 107 42 91 33 78 26 117 47 Average high F C 55 1 12 8 61 1 16 2 66 3 19 1 72 6 22 6 81 3 27 4 88 7 31 5 94 2 34 6 93 7 34 3 89 7 32 1 79 4 26 3 64 8 18 2 55 6 13 1 75 3 24 1 Average low F C 35 4 1 9 38 3 3 5 41 5 5 3 45 2 7 3 51 9 11 1 56 7 13 7 60 5 15 8 58 3 14 6 54 6 12 6 46 9 8 3 39 9 4 4 35 3 1 8 47 1 8 4 Record low F C 12 11 16 9 23 5 27 3 30 1 38 3 40 4 38 3 35 2 23 5 20 7 11 12 11 12 Average precipitation inches mm 4 86 123 4 42 112 4 29 109 1 75 44 1 04 26 48 12 02 0 51 08 2 0 42 11 1 42 36 3 28 83 4 61 117 26 67 677 Source Western Regional Climate Center 11 Climate data for Redding California 1961 1990 Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec YearAverage high F C 57 3 14 1 61 3 16 3 62 5 16 9 69 9 21 1 80 5 26 9 90 4 32 4 98 3 36 8 95 7 35 4 89 3 31 8 77 6 25 3 62 1 16 7 54 7 12 6 74 8 23 8 Daily mean F C 45 5 7 5 50 7 10 4 52 5 11 4 58 14 66 4 19 1 76 1 24 5 81 5 27 5 79 5 26 4 74 1 23 4 63 5 17 5 51 8 11 0 45 7 62 17 Average low F C 35 7 2 1 40 4 41 7 5 4 46 8 52 3 11 3 61 8 16 6 64 7 18 2 63 1 17 3 58 8 14 9 49 2 9 6 41 4 5 2 35 2 1 8 49 2 9 6 Average precipitation inches mm 6 06 154 4 45 113 4 38 111 2 08 53 1 27 32 0 56 14 0 17 4 3 0 46 12 0 91 23 2 24 57 5 21 132 5 51 140 33 3 850 Average precipitation days 13 1 8 7 12 3 7 9 7 2 4 0 0 6 0 9 2 1 4 1 6 8 10 2 77 9Mean monthly sunshine hours 226 256 312 351 395 423 451 421 338 314 251 204 3 942Source 12 Transportation EditSee also Transportation in the Sacramento metropolitan area Interstate 5 is the primary route through the Sacramento Valley traveling north south roughly along the valley s western edge Interstate 80 cuts a northeast to southwest swath through the southern end of the valley mostly through Sacramento and Yolo Counties and ends at the San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge Several secondary routes connect the two roads including Interstate 505 and State Route 113 The Sacramento area has a web of urban freeways Other principal routes in the region include State Route 99 which runs along the valley s eastern edge roughly parallel to I 5 from Sacramento until its northern terminus in Red Bluff State Route 20 which traverses the valley from west to east on its route from State Route 1 in Mendocino County to the Donner Pass State Route 49 named in honor of the California Gold Rush and running through many old mining towns in the foothills of the valley and State Route 45 which runs along the course of the Sacramento River roughly ten miles 20 km east of I 5 The Union Pacific Railroad serves the valley with its principal north south line from Oakland California to Portland Oregon via Sacramento Marysville Chico and Redding This is also the route of Amtrak s Coast Starlight passenger train The Union Pacific also has two east west lines through Donner Pass the former Central Pacific Railroad and through the Feather River gorge the former Western Pacific Railroad Amtrak s California Zephyr uses the Donner Pass route The BNSF Railway has a line from Klamath Falls Oregon to a junction with the Union Pacific Feather River line at Keddie The BNSF has trackage rights on both the UP east west routes In addition the California Northern Railroad operates the former Southern Pacific Railroad line on the west side of the valley from Davis to Tehama near Red Bluff Educational institutions EditUniversity of California Davis California State University Chico California State University Sacramento Simpson University in Redding William Jessup University in Rocklin McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento American River College in Sacramento Butte College in Oroville Cosumnes River College in Sacramento Folsom Lake College in Folsom Sacramento City College in Sacramento Shasta College in Redding Sierra College in Rocklin Solano Community College Vacaville Center in Vacaville Woodland Community College in Woodland Yuba Community College in MarysvilleProfessional sports teams EditNational Basketball Association NBA Edit Sacramento KingsPacific Coast League minor league baseball Edit Sacramento River CatsIndependent Women s Football League Edit Sacramento SirensWomen s Premier Soccer League Edit California Storm Sacramento PrideUnited Soccer League USL Edit Sacramento RepublicCities EditCities with over 500 000 inhabitants Edit SacramentoCities with 100 000 to 400 000 inhabitants Edit Chico Elk Grove Roseville VacavilleCities with 50 000 to 100 000 inhabitants Edit Citrus Heights Davis Folsom Rancho Cordova Redding Rocklin West Sacramento Woodland Yuba CityCities with 10 000 to 50 000 inhabitants Edit Anderson Dixon Galt Lincoln Marysville Oroville Paradise Red Bluff Shasta LakeCities with under 10 000 inhabitants Edit Biggs Colusa Corning Gridley Isleton Live Oak Loomis Orland Rio Vista Sutter Tehama Wheatland Williams Willows WintersSee also Edit California portal Sacramento Valley Museum Sacramento Valley Railroad 1852 77 Sacramento Valley and Eastern Railway 1908 1930s Leonard M Landsborough ca 1858 1927 Sacramento Valley landowner and legislator for the area John Buttencourt Avila father of the sweet potato industry Sacramento Valley National CemeteryNotes Edit Official records for Sacramento were kept exclusively at the airport since 10 November 1941 3 References Edit Diaz Manuel 1840 Diseno del Valle de Sacramento Map Sunsweet Growers Inc Careers in food Archived from the original on 2011 09 30 Retrieved 2011 11 13 ThreadEx a b NowData NOAA Online Weather Data National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Retrieved 2021 10 14 Summary of Monthly Normals SACRAMENTO EXECUTIVE AP CA US 1991 2020 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Retrieved 2021 10 14 WMO Climate Normals for SACRAMENTO EXECUTIVE ARPT CA 1961 1990 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Retrieved 2020 07 19 Reese Phillip January 7 2015 2014 was hottest year in Sacramento s history Sacramento Bee Summary of Monthly Normals SACRAMENTO 5 ESE CA US 1991 2020 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Retrieved 2021 10 14 Global Summary of the Month National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Retrieved 2021 10 14 SACRAMENTO 5 ESE CALIFORNIA Western Regional Climate Center CHICO EXPERIMENT STN CALIFORNIA Western Regional Climate Center Retrieved October 24 2012 Average Weather for Redding CA Temperature and Precipitation Retrieved 31 December 2009 External links EditWikimedia Commons has media related to Sacramento Valley California Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Sacramento Valley amp oldid 1042262732, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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