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Save the Children State of the World's Mothers report

The Save the Children State of the World's Mothers report (SOWM report) is an annual report by the Save the Children USA, which compiles statistics on the health of mothers and children and uses them to produce rankings of more than 170 countries, showing where mothers fare best and where they face the greatest hardships. The rankings are presented in the Mothers’ Index, which has been produced annually since the year 2000.

The lifetime risk of maternal death from pregnancy-related causes from the SOWM2010 report. Each color represents a twofold difference
— risk more than one in:
8
16
32
64
128
250
500
1000
2000
4000
8000
16000
32000
64000
Millennium Development Goal 5 represents a change of two colors (75% reduction) for each nation.

The 2014 report focuses on saving mothers and children in humanitarian crises. It finds that over half the 800 maternal and 18,000 child deaths every day take place in fragile settings which are at high risk of conflict and are particularly vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters.

The 2014 report ranks Finland the number one place to be a mother. Somalia in the Horn of Africa replaced Democratic Republic of the Congo (ranking 178th) as the worst place in the world to be a mother. The United States is down one spot from 2013, ranking 31st. Statistics show that 1 in 27 women from the bottom ranking countries will die from pregnancy-related causes. In addition, 1 in 7 children will die before his or her fifth birthday.

Contents

  • More than 60 million women and children are in need of humanitarian assistance this year.
  • Violence and conflict have uprooted more families than at any time on record.
  • Since the Mothers’ Index was launched in 2000, the majority of the bottom 10 countries have been in the midst of, or emerging from, a recent humanitarian emergency.
  • Civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has led to horrific abuses against women and children, and claimed more than 5.4 million lives. But less than 10 percent of these deaths have occurred in combat. Most deaths have been due to preventable or treatable causes such as malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia, newborn causes and malnutrition.
  • Syria's civil war has had a devastating impact on mothers and children. At least 1.3 million children and 650,000 women have fled the conflict and become refugees in neighboring countries, while over 9 million people inside Syria are in need of lifesaving humanitarian assistance.
  • The Philippines’ resiliency is being tested by more frequent and increasingly severe emergencies. Typhoon Haiyan on November 8, 2013 was one of the most destructive typhoons to ever hit land. It killed more than 6,000 people, devastated more than 2,000 hospitals and health clinics and destroyed countless health records and computer systems.
  • In the United States, despite the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina and other recent disasters, many gaps remain in emergency planning and preparedness. While the conditions facing mothers and children in the U.S. are very different from those in developing or middle-income countries, there are common challenges, including the resilience of health care and other essential services, and the extent to which humanitarian response reaches those mothers and children in greatest need.

An original analysis by Save the Children estimates that within the first month of life, more than 1 million babies could be saved each year with universal access to these products, which cost between 13 cents and $6 each and are ready for rapid scale-up now. The products are:

  • steroid injections for women in preterm labor (to reduce deaths due to premature babies’ breathing problems);
  • resuscitation devices (to save babies who do not breathe at birth);
  • chlorhexidine cord cleansing (to prevent umbilical cord infections); and
  • injectable antibiotics (to treat newborn sepsis and pneumonia).
  • Many children in many countries are not getting adequate nutrition during their first 1000 days of life.
  • The malnutrition of children is widespread and limits the future success of both children and their countries.
  • Malnutrition cannot be solved by economic growth alone.
  • Health workers save millions of children.
  • The United States has the least favorable environment for breastfeeding mothers (in the industrialized world).
  • The top 10 countries in the 2012 SOWM Report are: Norway, Iceland, Sweden, New Zealand, Denmark, Finland, Australia, Belgium, Ireland, Netherlands and UK (tied).
  • The bottom 10 countries (ranked 155-164) in the 2012 SOWM Report are: Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, Sudan, Chad, Eritrea, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Yemen, Afghanistan, and Niger.

Vital Statistics

  • More than 2.6 million child deaths each year are caused by malnutrition.
  • Stunted (bodies and minds have suffered permanent, irreversible damage from malnutrition) children make up approximately 27% of all children globally (or about 171 million).
  • Breastfed children in developing countries are a minimum of 6 times more likely to survive in the early months of life than children who are not breastfed.
  • Stunting rates at 12 months could be cut by around 20% if all children in the developing world were to receive adequate nutrition and feeding of solid foods with breastfeeding.
  • If breastfeeding were practiced optimally, it could prevent approximately 1 million deaths each year. This is because breastfeeding is the single most effective nutrition intervention for saving lives.
  • On average, adults who were malnourished as children can earn an estimated 20% less than those who weren't malnourished as children.
  • Due to the effects of malnutrition in developing countries, losses in GDP can add up to 2-3% annually.
  • Malnutrition is estimated to cost $20–$30 billion per year globally.
  • Thirty counties have stunting rates of 40% or more.

Types of Malnutrition

Stunting - Stunting is when a child is too short for their age. It is caused by poor diet and frequent infections. Generally, stunting occurs before the age of 2, with largely irreversible effects. These effects include: delayed motor development, impaired cognitive function, and poor performance in school.

  • 27% of all children globally are stunted.

Wasting - Wasting is when a child's weight is too low for their height. Wasting is caused by acute malnutrition. It is a strong predictor of mortality for children under 5 years old. Usually, it is caused by either food shortage or disease.

  • 10% of all children globally are wasted.

Underweight - When a child is underweight, the child's weight is too low for their age. Being underweight can mean the child is stunted, wasted or both. Weight is an indicator of short-term undernutrition. A deficit in height (i.e. stunting) is difficult to correct but a deficit in weight (i.e. underweight) can be resolved if nutrition and health are improved later in childhood.

  • More than 100 million children are underweight worldwide.
  • 19% of child deaths are associated with being underweight.

Micronutrient deficiency - Micronutrient deficiency is when a child is lacking essential vitamins or minerals such as Vitamin A, iron, and zinc. These deficiencies are caused by a long-term lack of nutritious food or they can be caused by infections such as worms.

  • 10% of all children's deaths are associated with micronutrient deficiencies.

Nutrition in the First 1000 Days

There are 171 million children (17%) globally who do not have the opportunity to reach their full potential. This is due to not only the physical, but the mental effects of poor nutrition in the earliest months of life.

  • More than 2.6 million children and 100,000 mothers die every year as a result of under nutrition.
  • Poor nutrition can weaken immune systems which can make both children and adults more likely to die of diarrhea or pneumonia. It can also impair the effectiveness of life saving medications.
  • During the critical 1000-day window, good nutrition is crucial to develop a child's cognitive capacity and his or her physical growth.
  • 1 in 4 of the world's children are chronically malnourished (stunted).

Children's Wellbeing of the Mother's Index

Out of 171 countries, Iceland is first and Somalia is last.

  • Every child in Iceland enjoys both good education and good health.
  • In Somalia, children face the highest risk of death in the world. On average, more than one in six children will die before the age of 5.
  • Nearly 1/3 of Somali children are malnourished.
  • 70% of children in Somalia lack access to safe water.
  • Less than 1 in 3 Somali children are enrolled in school and boys outnumber girls almost 2 to 1.

"Lifesaving Six"

More than half of the world's children do not have access to the "Lifesaving Six": iron folate, breastfeeding, complementary feeding, vitamin A, zinc, and hygiene.

  • Globally, more than 2 million children's lives could be saved each year if the "Lifesaving Six" could be implemented.
  • Malnutrition rates usually peak during the time of complementary feeding.

Vitamin A

  • Approximately 190 million preschool-age children don't get enough vitamin A.
  • Approximately 19 million (15%) of pregnant women don't get enough vitamin A.
  • Vitamin A deficiencies are a contributing factor each year in 1.3 million deaths due to diarrhea and almost 118,000 deaths from measles.
  • Vitamin A deficiencies can lead to partial and total blindness.
  • Vitamin A costs 2 cents a dose and could reduce about 2% of child deaths yearly if children were given two doses a year.

Zinc

  • Zinc costs 2 cents a tablet and a full life-saving course of zinc treatment (for diarrhea) would cost less than 30 cents.
  • It is estimated that 4% of child deaths could be prevented if diarrhea could be treated with zinc.

Hygiene

  • Washing hands with soap could prevent diarrheal disease and pneumonia, which combined are responsible for 2.9 million child deaths every year.
  • It is estimated that 3% of child deaths could be prevented if children had access to safe drinking water, improved sanitation facilities, and good hygiene (especially hand washing).

Breastfeeding

  • Breastfeeding is the single most effective nutrition intervention for saving the lives of children. It could prevent close to 1 million deaths each year.
  • In developing countries, children who are breastfed are at least six times more likely to survive the early months of life that children who are not breastfed.
  • It is estimated that in the United States alone, low rates of breastfeeding add $13 billion to medical costs yearly.

Norway

  • In Norway, a skilled health professional is present at virtually every birth.
  • Typically, a girl in Norway can expect to receive 18 years of formal education and live to be 83 years of age on average.
  • 82% of Norwegian women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception.
  • In Norway, only 1 in 175 families will lose a child before his or her fifth birthday.

Niger

  • In Niger only a third of births are attended by some sort of health personnel.
  • Typically, a girl in Niger can expect to receive only 4 years of education and live to be 56 years of age on average.
  • Only 5% of women in Niger use some method of birth control or other form of contraception.
  • In Niger, approximately 1 in 7 children die before his or her fifth birthday. According to these statistics, every mother is likely to lose a child.

Norway

  • In Norway, a skilled health professional is present at virtually every birth compared to Afghanistan where only 14% of births are attended.
  • Typically, a girl in Norway can expect to receive 18 years of formal education and live to be 83 years of age on average.
  • 82% of Norwegian women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception.
  • In Norway, only 1 in 175 families will lose a child before his or her fifth birthday.

Afghanistan

  • In Afghanistan, a woman generally has less than five years of education and will probably not live to be 45 years old.
  • Less than 16% of Afghan women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception.
  • In Afghanistan, approximately 1 in 5 children die before his or her fifth birthday. According to these statistics, every mother in Afghanistan is likely to lose a child.
  • A large number of countries are not able to provide basic health care that could save mothers' and children's lives.
  • Female health workers play a critical role in saving the lives of women, newborns, and young children.
  • Small investments in female health workers can have a measurable impact on survival rates in more isolated rural communities.
  • The most effective health care can begin at home.
  • Countries with more front-line female health workers have seen considerable declines in maternal, newborn, and child mortality.

Norway

  • In Norway, a skilled health professional is present at virtually every birth compared to Afghanistan where only 14% of births are attended.
  • Typically, a girl in Norway can expect to receive 18 years of formal education and live to be 83 years of age on average.
  • 82% of Norwegian women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception.
  • In Norway, only 1 in 132 families will lose a child before his or her fifth birthday.

Afghanistan

  • In Afghanistan, a woman generally has a little more than four years of education and will probably live to be around 44 years old.
  • Less than 16% of Afghan women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception.
  • In Afghanistan, approximately 1 in 4 children die before his or her fifth birthday. According to these statistics, every mother in Afghanistan is likely to lose a child.

The reports have been widely covered in the world press, with attention for local strengths and weaknesses. For example, in 2010 USA Today focused on the low ranking of the U.S. (28th place, below Estonia, Latvia, and Croatia) due to high rates of maternal and infant mortality, low preschool enrollment, and a particularly weak maternal leave benefit. It quoted the report:

"A woman in the United States is more than five times as likely as a woman in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Greece or Italy to die from pregnancy-related causes in her lifetime and her risk of maternal death is nearly 10-fold that of a woman in Ireland."

ABC News interviewed physicians and nonprofit leaders who questioned whether global comparisons could be made reliably, due to possible differences in the definition of ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth, and abortion statistics. Relevant factors may include lack of health insurance, illegal immigration by women with poor prenatal care, and maternal obesity statistics. According to Michael Katz, a senior vice president at the March of Dimes Foundation, "The major question I would ask is, 'Why do African American populations have worse results than the white population?'"

Infant mortality rates before age 5. Map colors mark rates per 1000 of at least:
3
4
8
16
32
64
128
257

Pravda.ru and Sify picked up an IANS/EFE report focusing on Cuba's rating as the best place to be a mother in the developing world. The Herald Sun boasted Australia's second-best placement for mothers, quoting a happy mother about hospital, maternal and child health support, and 12-month workplace maternal leave. However, the Adelaide Advertiser focused on Australia's lower [28th] ranking on the Children's Index, due in part to a child mortality rate three times higher for aboriginal infants. It quoted Save The Children's Annie Pettitt:

An important first step would be to tackle the shortfall of almost 2000 midwives in Australia, especially in remote and rural areas where we know the shortage is greatest.

An editorial in the Philippine Daily Inquirer discussed explanations for the Philippine's 48th-place ranking in the second tier. The column attributed much of the problem to a "brain drain", though it described as "much too high" the SOWM report's figure that 85% of Filipino nurses leave to pursue better pay and standards of living overseas. It questioned standards at "diploma mills" and called for incentives to bring health professionals into poor communities, while criticizing the chilling effects of a "raid on a training session of health-care workers" as subversives in Morong, Rizal. The Philippines local chapter of Save the Children produced a State of Filipino Mothers report in 2008 with rankings by province.

The Times of India lamented India's 73rd of 77th place in the second tier, describing a critical shortage of 74,000 accredited social health activists and 21,066 auxiliary nurse midwives below governmental norms and that thousands of women were dying because they could not access the most basic healthcare facilities or that, if they were available, they were low quality.

Though data for some countries are not known with much certainty, the SOWM 2010 report had many findings in common with a recent study published in The Lancet, which found that 23 of 181 countries are on track to achieve Millennium Development Goal 5 of a 75% reduction in maternal mortality rate between 1990 and 2015.

The 2010 report was released by Save the Children in Canada on May 4, 10:00 a.m., as a part of an action directed toward members of Parliament in support of an announcement by Prime Minister Stephen Harper that child and maternal health would be the top priority at the 36th G8 summit in Huntsville, Ontario in June. As described in the press release:

In the week leading up to Mother's Day, 5,700 mothers around the world will die. During this Mother's Day week, CARE, the Canadian Association of Midwives, Plan Canada, Results, Save the Children Canada, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, UNICEF and World Vision have joined forces in Ottawa to get the attention of the government and public, to have Canada put its leadership at the upcoming G8 into action and stop preventable child and maternal deaths

The list is incomplete and only includes the top 35 countries.

Rank Country Lifetime risk of maternal death Expected # of years of formal schooling
1 Finland 12,200 17.0
2 Norway 7,900 17.6
3 Sweden 14,100 15.8
4 Iceland 8,900 18.7
5 Netherlands 10,500 17.9
6 Denmark 4,500 16.9
7 Spain 12,000 17.1
8 Germany 10,600 16.3
9 Australia 8,100 19.9
9 Belgium 7,500 16.2
11 Italy 20,300 16.3
12 Austria 8,100 15.6
13 Switzerland 9,500 15.7
14 Portugal 9,200 16.3
15 Singapore 25,300 14.4
16 New Zealand 3,300 19.4
17 Slovenia 5,900 16.8
18 Canada 5,200 15.8
19 Ireland 8,100 18.6
20 France 6,200 16.0
20 Greece 25,500 16.5
22 Luxembourg 3,200 13.9
23 Israel 25,100 16.5
24 Czech Republic 12,100 16.4
24 Lithuania 9,400 16.7
26 Belarus 16,300 15.7
26 United Kingdom 4,600 16.2
28 Estonia 5,100 15.7
29 Poland 14,400 15.5
30 South Korea 4,800 17.0
31 United States 2,400 16.5
32 Japan 13,100 15.3
33 Croatia 4,100 14.5
34 Latvia 2,000 15.5
35 Cuba 1,000 14.5

Notes

  1. Discounted to 18 years prior to calculating the index rank
  2. Discounted to 18 years prior to calculating the index rank
  3. Discounted to 18 years prior to calculating the index rank

Additional maps (statistics pertaining to females)

Years formal schooling
Modern contraception usage
Lifespan
National government seats
Earned income relative to males
Gross preprimary enrollment ratio
  1. Save the Children (May 2014). "State of the World's Mothers". (the SOWM 2014 report landing page)
  2. International Save the Children Alliance (2010-05-03). "State of the World's Mothers Report 2010: Best and Worst Places to be a Mother". Reuters AlertNet.
  3. Marcela Sanchez (2006-05-11). "World Mother's Report:Small Changes Can Save Small Lives". Washington Post.
  4. Celia W. Dugger (2007-05-08). "Report on Child Deaths Finds Some Hope in Poorest Nations". New York Times.
  5. See [1] for links to all of the annual SOWM reports.
  6. "Gifts for Mother's Day". Save the Children. Retrieved2019-06-05.
  7. "Reports and Publications". Save the Children. Retrieved2019-06-05.
  8. http://www.savethechildren.org/atf/cf/%7B9def2ebe-10ae-432c-9bd0-df91d2eba74a%7D/SOWM2011_FULL_REPORT.PDF
  9. "Reports and Publications"(PDF).
  10. Michael Winter (2010-05-04). "Survey ranks Norway best for mothers, U.S. 28th". USA Today.
  11. SOWM 2010 report, p. 34
  12. "Where's the Best Place to be a Mom?". ABC News. 2010-05-08.
  13. "Cuba Provides Best Conditions for Motherhood in the World". Pravda.ru. 2010-05-05.
  14. IANS/EFE (2010-05-05). "Cuba rated best place to be a mother in developing world". Sify.com. Archived from the original on 2011-08-11.
  15. Marianne Betts (2010-05-05). "We are great for mothers". Herald Sun.
  16. Edwina Scott (2010-05-04). "Australia second best country in world to be a mum - report". AdelaideNow.
  17. Michael Tan (2010-05-11). "Mothers and elections". Philippine Daily Inquirer.
  18. Times News Network (2010-05-04). "India among worst places to become a mother: Survey". The Times of India.
  19. Jo Chandler (2005-05-08). "The toughest kind of labour". The Age.
  20. Hogan, Margaret C; Foreman, Kyle J; Naghavi, Mohsen; Ahn, Stephanie Y; Wang, Mengru; Makela, Susanna M; Lopez, Alan D; Lozano, Rafael; Murray, Christopher JL (2010). "Maternal mortality for 181 countries, 1980–2008: A systematic analysis of progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5". The Lancet. 375 (9726): 1609–23. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60518-1. PMID 20382417. S2CID 22820420.
  21. World Vision Canada. "Media Advisory - A week to save moms and their kids". CNW Group.

Save the Children State of the World's Mothers report
Save the Children State of the World s Mothers report Language Watch Edit The Save the Children State of the World s Mothers report SOWM report 1 is an annual report by the Save the Children USA which compiles statistics on the health of mothers and children and uses them to produce rankings of more than 170 countries showing where mothers fare best and where they face the greatest hardships 2 3 4 The rankings are presented in the Mothers Index which has been produced annually since the year 2000 5 The lifetime risk of maternal death from pregnancy related causes from the SOWM2010 report Each color represents a twofold difference risk more than one in 8 16 32 64 128 250 500 1000 2000 4000 8000 16000 32000 64000 Millennium Development Goal 5 represents a change of two colors 75 reduction for each nation The 2014 report focuses on saving mothers and children in humanitarian crises It finds that over half the 800 maternal and 18 000 child deaths every day take place in fragile settings which are at high risk of conflict and are particularly vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters 6 The 2014 report ranks Finland the number one place to be a mother Somalia in the Horn of Africa replaced Democratic Republic of the Congo ranking 178th as the worst place in the world to be a mother The United States is down one spot from 2013 ranking 31st Statistics show that 1 in 27 women from the bottom ranking countries will die from pregnancy related causes In addition 1 in 7 children will die before his or her fifth birthday 7 Contents 1 2014 SOWM Report Key Findings 2 2013 SOWM Report Key Findings 3 2012 SOWM Report Key Findings 3 1 Vital Statistics 3 1 1 Types of Malnutrition 3 1 2 Nutrition in the First 1000 Days 3 1 3 Children s Wellbeing of the Mother s Index 3 1 4 Lifesaving Six 4 2012 Mothers Index 5 2011 Mothers Index 6 2010 SOWM Report Key Findings 7 2010 Mothers Index 8 Press coverage 9 Activism 10 2014 rankings 10 1 Additional maps statistics pertaining to females 11 See also 12 References 13 External links2014 SOWM Report Key Findings EditMore than 60 million women and children are in need of humanitarian assistance this year Violence and conflict have uprooted more families than at any time on record Since the Mothers Index was launched in 2000 the majority of the bottom 10 countries have been in the midst of or emerging from a recent humanitarian emergency Civil war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has led to horrific abuses against women and children and claimed more than 5 4 million lives But less than 10 percent of these deaths have occurred in combat Most deaths have been due to preventable or treatable causes such as malaria diarrhea pneumonia newborn causes and malnutrition Syria s civil war has had a devastating impact on mothers and children At least 1 3 million children and 650 000 women have fled the conflict and become refugees in neighboring countries while over 9 million people inside Syria are in need of lifesaving humanitarian assistance The Philippines resiliency is being tested by more frequent and increasingly severe emergencies Typhoon Haiyan on November 8 2013 was one of the most destructive typhoons to ever hit land It killed more than 6 000 people devastated more than 2 000 hospitals and health clinics and destroyed countless health records and computer systems In the United States despite the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina and other recent disasters many gaps remain in emergency planning and preparedness While the conditions facing mothers and children in the U S are very different from those in developing or middle income countries there are common challenges including the resilience of health care and other essential services and the extent to which humanitarian response reaches those mothers and children in greatest need 2013 SOWM Report Key Findings EditAn original analysis by Save the Children estimates that within the first month of life more than 1 million babies could be saved each year with universal access to these products which cost between 13 cents and 6 each and are ready for rapid scale up now The products are steroid injections for women in preterm labor to reduce deaths due to premature babies breathing problems resuscitation devices to save babies who do not breathe at birth chlorhexidine cord cleansing to prevent umbilical cord infections and injectable antibiotics to treat newborn sepsis and pneumonia 6 2012 SOWM Report Key Findings EditMany children in many countries are not getting adequate nutrition during their first 1000 days of life The malnutrition of children is widespread and limits the future success of both children and their countries Malnutrition cannot be solved by economic growth alone Health workers save millions of children The United States has the least favorable environment for breastfeeding mothers in the industrialized world The top 10 countries in the 2012 SOWM Report are Norway Iceland Sweden New Zealand Denmark Finland Australia Belgium Ireland Netherlands and UK tied The bottom 10 countries ranked 155 164 in the 2012 SOWM Report are Democratic Republic of Congo South Sudan Sudan Chad Eritrea Mali Guinea Bissau Yemen Afghanistan and Niger 7 Vital Statistics Edit More than 2 6 million child deaths each year are caused by malnutrition Stunted bodies and minds have suffered permanent irreversible damage from malnutrition children make up approximately 27 of all children globally or about 171 million Breastfed children in developing countries are a minimum of 6 times more likely to survive in the early months of life than children who are not breastfed Stunting rates at 12 months could be cut by around 20 if all children in the developing world were to receive adequate nutrition and feeding of solid foods with breastfeeding If breastfeeding were practiced optimally it could prevent approximately 1 million deaths each year This is because breastfeeding is the single most effective nutrition intervention for saving lives On average adults who were malnourished as children can earn an estimated 20 less than those who weren t malnourished as children Due to the effects of malnutrition in developing countries losses in GDP can add up to 2 3 annually Malnutrition is estimated to cost 20 30 billion per year globally Thirty counties have stunting rates of 40 or more 7 Types of Malnutrition Edit Stunting Stunting is when a child is too short for their age It is caused by poor diet and frequent infections Generally stunting occurs before the age of 2 with largely irreversible effects These effects include delayed motor development impaired cognitive function and poor performance in school 27 of all children globally are stunted Wasting Wasting is when a child s weight is too low for their height Wasting is caused by acute malnutrition It is a strong predictor of mortality for children under 5 years old Usually it is caused by either food shortage or disease 10 of all children globally are wasted Underweight When a child is underweight the child s weight is too low for their age Being underweight can mean the child is stunted wasted or both Weight is an indicator of short term undernutrition A deficit in height i e stunting is difficult to correct but a deficit in weight i e underweight can be resolved if nutrition and health are improved later in childhood More than 100 million children are underweight worldwide 19 of child deaths are associated with being underweight Micronutrient deficiency Micronutrient deficiency is when a child is lacking essential vitamins or minerals such as Vitamin A iron and zinc These deficiencies are caused by a long term lack of nutritious food or they can be caused by infections such as worms 10 of all children s deaths are associated with micronutrient deficiencies 7 Nutrition in the First 1000 Days Edit There are 171 million children 17 globally who do not have the opportunity to reach their full potential This is due to not only the physical but the mental effects of poor nutrition in the earliest months of life More than 2 6 million children and 100 000 mothers die every year as a result of under nutrition Poor nutrition can weaken immune systems which can make both children and adults more likely to die of diarrhea or pneumonia It can also impair the effectiveness of life saving medications During the critical 1000 day window good nutrition is crucial to develop a child s cognitive capacity and his or her physical growth 1 in 4 of the world s children are chronically malnourished stunted 7 Children s Wellbeing of the Mother s Index Edit Out of 171 countries Iceland is first and Somalia is last Every child in Iceland enjoys both good education and good health In Somalia children face the highest risk of death in the world On average more than one in six children will die before the age of 5 Nearly 1 3 of Somali children are malnourished 70 of children in Somalia lack access to safe water Less than 1 in 3 Somali children are enrolled in school and boys outnumber girls almost 2 to 1 7 Lifesaving Six Edit More than half of the world s children do not have access to the Lifesaving Six iron folate breastfeeding complementary feeding vitamin A zinc and hygiene Globally more than 2 million children s lives could be saved each year if the Lifesaving Six could be implemented Malnutrition rates usually peak during the time of complementary feeding Vitamin A Approximately 190 million preschool age children don t get enough vitamin A Approximately 19 million 15 of pregnant women don t get enough vitamin A Vitamin A deficiencies are a contributing factor each year in 1 3 million deaths due to diarrhea and almost 118 000 deaths from measles Vitamin A deficiencies can lead to partial and total blindness Vitamin A costs 2 cents a dose and could reduce about 2 of child deaths yearly if children were given two doses a year Zinc Zinc costs 2 cents a tablet and a full life saving course of zinc treatment for diarrhea would cost less than 30 cents It is estimated that 4 of child deaths could be prevented if diarrhea could be treated with zinc Hygiene Washing hands with soap could prevent diarrheal disease and pneumonia which combined are responsible for 2 9 million child deaths every year It is estimated that 3 of child deaths could be prevented if children had access to safe drinking water improved sanitation facilities and good hygiene especially hand washing Breastfeeding Breastfeeding is the single most effective nutrition intervention for saving the lives of children It could prevent close to 1 million deaths each year In developing countries children who are breastfed are at least six times more likely to survive the early months of life that children who are not breastfed It is estimated that in the United States alone low rates of breastfeeding add 13 billion to medical costs yearly 7 2012 Mothers Index EditNorway 7 In Norway a skilled health professional is present at virtually every birth Typically a girl in Norway can expect to receive 18 years of formal education and live to be 83 years of age on average 82 of Norwegian women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception In Norway only 1 in 175 families will lose a child before his or her fifth birthday Niger 7 In Niger only a third of births are attended by some sort of health personnel Typically a girl in Niger can expect to receive only 4 years of education and live to be 56 years of age on average Only 5 of women in Niger use some method of birth control or other form of contraception In Niger approximately 1 in 7 children die before his or her fifth birthday According to these statistics every mother is likely to lose a child 2011 Mothers Index EditNorway 8 In Norway a skilled health professional is present at virtually every birth compared to Afghanistan where only 14 of births are attended Typically a girl in Norway can expect to receive 18 years of formal education and live to be 83 years of age on average 82 of Norwegian women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception In Norway only 1 in 175 families will lose a child before his or her fifth birthday Afghanistan 8 In Afghanistan a woman generally has less than five years of education and will probably not live to be 45 years old Less than 16 of Afghan women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception In Afghanistan approximately 1 in 5 children die before his or her fifth birthday According to these statistics every mother in Afghanistan is likely to lose a child 2010 SOWM Report Key Findings EditA large number of countries are not able to provide basic health care that could save mothers and children s lives Female health workers play a critical role in saving the lives of women newborns and young children Small investments in female health workers can have a measurable impact on survival rates in more isolated rural communities The most effective health care can begin at home Countries with more front line female health workers have seen considerable declines in maternal newborn and child mortality 9 2010 Mothers Index EditNorway 9 In Norway a skilled health professional is present at virtually every birth compared to Afghanistan where only 14 of births are attended Typically a girl in Norway can expect to receive 18 years of formal education and live to be 83 years of age on average 82 of Norwegian women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception In Norway only 1 in 132 families will lose a child before his or her fifth birthday Afghanistan 9 In Afghanistan a woman generally has a little more than four years of education and will probably live to be around 44 years old Less than 16 of Afghan women use some method of birth control or other form of contraception In Afghanistan approximately 1 in 4 children die before his or her fifth birthday According to these statistics every mother in Afghanistan is likely to lose a child Press coverage EditThe reports have been widely covered in the world press with attention for local strengths and weaknesses For example in 2010 USA Today focused on the low ranking of the U S 28th place below Estonia Latvia and Croatia due to high rates of maternal and infant mortality low preschool enrollment and a particularly weak maternal leave benefit 10 It quoted the report 11 A woman in the United States is more than five times as likely as a woman in Bosnia and Herzegovina Greece or Italy to die from pregnancy related causes in her lifetime and her risk of maternal death is nearly 10 fold that of a woman in Ireland ABC News interviewed physicians and nonprofit leaders who questioned whether global comparisons could be made reliably due to possible differences in the definition of ectopic pregnancy stillbirth and abortion statistics Relevant factors may include lack of health insurance illegal immigration by women with poor prenatal care and maternal obesity statistics According to Michael Katz a senior vice president at the March of Dimes Foundation The major question I would ask is Why do African American populations have worse results than the white population 12 Infant mortality rates before age 5 Map colors mark rates per 1000 of at least 3 4 8 16 32 64 128 257 Pravda ru and Sify picked up an IANS EFE report focusing on Cuba s rating as the best place to be a mother in the developing world 13 14 The Herald Sun boasted Australia s second best placement for mothers quoting a happy mother about hospital maternal and child health support and 12 month workplace maternal leave 15 However the Adelaide Advertiser focused on Australia s lower 28th ranking on the Children s Index due in part to a child mortality rate three times higher for aboriginal infants 16 It quoted Save The Children s Annie Pettitt An important first step would be to tackle the shortfall of almost 2000 midwives in Australia especially in remote and rural areas where we know the shortage is greatest An editorial in the Philippine Daily Inquirer discussed explanations for the Philippine s 48th place ranking in the second tier The column attributed much of the problem to a brain drain though it described as much too high the SOWM report s figure that 85 of Filipino nurses leave to pursue better pay and standards of living overseas It questioned standards at diploma mills and called for incentives to bring health professionals into poor communities while criticizing the chilling effects of a raid on a training session of health care workers as subversives in Morong Rizal The Philippines local chapter of Save the Children produced a State of Filipino Mothers report in 2008 with rankings by province 17 The Times of India lamented India s 73rd of 77th place in the second tier describing a critical shortage of 74 000 accredited social health activists and 21 066 auxiliary nurse midwives below governmental norms and that thousands of women were dying because they could not access the most basic healthcare facilities or that if they were available they were low quality 18 Though data for some countries are not known with much certainty the SOWM 2010 report had many findings in common with a recent study published in The Lancet which found that 23 of 181 countries are on track to achieve Millennium Development Goal 5 of a 75 reduction in maternal mortality rate between 1990 and 2015 19 20 Activism EditThe 2010 report was released by Save the Children in Canada on May 4 10 00 a m as a part of an action directed toward members of Parliament in support of an announcement by Prime Minister Stephen Harper that child and maternal health would be the top priority at the 36th G8 summit in Huntsville Ontario in June As described in the press release 21 In the week leading up to Mother s Day 5 700 mothers around the world will die During this Mother s Day week CARE the Canadian Association of Midwives Plan Canada Results Save the Children Canada the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada UNICEF and World Vision have joined forces in Ottawa to get the attention of the government and public to have Canada put its leadership at the upcoming G8 into action and stop preventable child and maternal deaths2014 rankings EditThe list is incomplete and only includes the top 35 countries 7 Rank Country Lifetime risk of maternal death Expected of years of formal schooling1 Finland 12 200 17 02 Norway 7 900 17 63 Sweden 14 100 15 84 Iceland 8 900 18 75 Netherlands 10 500 17 96 Denmark 4 500 16 97 Spain 12 000 17 18 Germany 10 600 16 39 Australia 8 100 19 9 note 1 9 Belgium 7 500 16 211 Italy 20 300 16 312 Austria 8 100 15 613 Switzerland 9 500 15 714 Portugal 9 200 16 315 Singapore 25 300 14 416 New Zealand 3 300 19 4 note 2 17 Slovenia 5 900 16 818 Canada 5 200 15 819 Ireland 8 100 18 6 note 3 20 France 6 200 16 020 Greece 25 500 16 522 Luxembourg 3 200 13 923 Israel 25 100 16 524 Czech Republic 12 100 16 424 Lithuania 9 400 16 726 Belarus 16 300 15 726 United Kingdom 4 600 16 228 Estonia 5 100 15 729 Poland 14 400 15 530 South Korea 4 800 17 031 United States 2 400 16 532 Japan 13 100 15 333 Croatia 4 100 14 534 Latvia 2 000 15 535 Cuba 1 000 14 5 Notes Discounted to 18 years prior to calculating the index rank Discounted to 18 years prior to calculating the index rank Discounted to 18 years prior to calculating the index rank Additional maps statistics pertaining to females Edit Years formal schooling Modern contraception usage Lifespan National government seats Earned income relative to males Gross preprimary enrollment ratioSee also EditWorld Health Report Maternal healthReferences Edit Save the Children May 2014 State of the World s Mothers the SOWM 2014 report landing page International Save the Children Alliance 2010 05 03 State of the World s Mothers Report 2010 Best and Worst Places to be a Mother Reuters AlertNet Marcela Sanchez 2006 05 11 World Mother s Report Small Changes Can Save Small Lives Washington Post Celia W Dugger 2007 05 08 Report on Child Deaths Finds Some Hope in Poorest Nations New York Times See 1 for links to all of the annual SOWM reports a b Gifts for Mother s Day Save the Children Retrieved 2019 06 05 a b c d e f g h i j Reports and Publications Save the Children Retrieved 2019 06 05 a b http www savethechildren org atf cf 7B9def2ebe 10ae 432c 9bd0 df91d2eba74a 7D SOWM2011 FULL REPORT PDF a b c Reports and Publications PDF Michael Winter 2010 05 04 Survey ranks Norway best for mothers U S 28th USA Today SOWM 2010 report p 34 Where s the Best Place to be a Mom ABC News 2010 05 08 Cuba Provides Best Conditions for Motherhood in the World Pravda ru 2010 05 05 IANS EFE 2010 05 05 Cuba rated best place to be a mother in developing world Sify com Archived from the original on 2011 08 11 Marianne Betts 2010 05 05 We are great for mothers Herald Sun Edwina Scott 2010 05 04 Australia second best country in world to be a mum report AdelaideNow Michael Tan 2010 05 11 Mothers and elections Philippine Daily Inquirer Times News Network 2010 05 04 India among worst places to become a mother Survey The Times of India Jo Chandler 2005 05 08 The toughest kind of labour The Age Hogan Margaret C Foreman Kyle J Naghavi Mohsen Ahn Stephanie Y Wang Mengru Makela Susanna M Lopez Alan D Lozano Rafael Murray Christopher JL 2010 Maternal mortality for 181 countries 1980 2008 A systematic analysis of progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5 The Lancet 375 9726 1609 23 doi 10 1016 S0140 6736 10 60518 1 PMID 20382417 S2CID 22820420 World Vision Canada Media Advisory A week to save moms and their kids CNW Group External links EditOfficial website Save the Children State of the World s Mothers report 2010 Save the Children State of the World s Mothers report 2013 Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Save the Children State of the World 27s Mothers report amp oldid 1036157886, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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