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Social Democratic Party (Japan)

This article is about the currently active Japanese political party established in 1996. For other uses, see Social Democratic Party (Japan) (disambiguation).

The Social Democratic Party (社会民主党, Shakai Minshu-tō, often abbreviated to社民党 Shamin-tō) is a political party in Japan that was established in 1996. Since its reformation and name change in 1996, it has advocated pacifism and defined itself as a social-democratic party. It was previously known as the Japan Socialist Party (日本社会党, Nihon Shakaitō, abbreviated to JSP in English).

Before 2000

Main article: Japan Socialist Party

In 1995, the former Japan Socialist Party (JSP) was in a deep crisis. Aiming at saving the party, the leadership of JSP decided to dissolve the party and to establish a new social democratic party. In January 1996, such a new party, the Social Democratic Party, was established along with the dissolution of JSP. De jure, JSP changed its name to the Social Democratic Party (SDP) as an interim party for forming a new party, and a movement for transforming the SDP into a new social-democratic and liberal party was unsuccessful. Under Murayama's successor Ryūtarō Hashimoto (LDP), the SDP remained part of the ruling coalition. Long before the disappointing result in the 1996 Japanese general election, the party lost the majority of its members of the House of Representatives, mainly to predecessors of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) that was formed in 1996, but also some to the NFP and other opposition parties. After its electoral defeat in the 1996 general election when it lost another 15 of its remaining 30 seats in the lower house, the SDP left the ruling coalition which it had entered as the second largest force in Japanese politics as a minor party.

2000s–2010s

The SDP won six seats in the 2003 Japanese general election, compared with 18 seats in the previous 2000 Japanese general election. Its motives against the Self-Defense Forces have reverted into abolishing it in the long term, returning into its opposition against the force it had applied in the 1950s. Doi had been the leader since 1996, but she resigned in 2003, taking responsibility for the election losses. Mizuho Fukushima was elected as the new party leader in November 2003. In the 2004 Japanese House of Councillors election, the SDP won only two seats, having five seats in the House of Councillors and six seats in the House of Representatives. In 2006, the party unexpectedly gained the governorship of the Shiga Prefecture. In the 2009 Japanese general election, the DPJ made large gains and the SDP maintained its base of 7 seats in the, becoming a junior partner in a new government coalition; however, disagreements over the issue of the Futenma base led to the sacking of Fukushima from the cabinet on 28 May and the SDP subsequently voted to leave the ruling coalition.

A SDP campaign van outside a station in December 2012

As of October 2010, the SDP had six members in the House of Representatives and four members in the House of Councillors. Following the 2012 Japanese general election, the party retained only six seats in the whole of the Diet, two in the House of Representatives and four in the House of Councillors. The count lowered to five seats in 2013. In 2013, the party's headquarters in Nagatacho, where the party's predecessor the JSP had moved in 1964, were demolished. The headquarters moved to a smaller office in Nagatacho.

During the nomination period of the 2016 Japanese House of Councillors election, the party signed an agreement with the Democratic, Communist and People's Life parties to field a jointly-endorsed candidate in each of the 32 districts in which only one seat is contested, thereby uniting in an attempt to take control of the House from the LDP/Komeito coalition. The party had two Councillors up for re-election and fielded a total of 11 candidates in the election, 4 in single and multi-member districts and 7 in the 48-seat national proportional representation block.

In the 2017 Japanese general election, the party managed to hold to its two seats it had prior to the election. Tadatomo Yoshida declined to run for re-election when his term expired in January 2018. Seiji Mataichi was elected unopposed in the ensuing leadership election and took office on 25 February 2018.

On 14 November 2020, the party voted to agree to a merger arrangement with the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (CDP), allowing members to leave the SDP and join the latter party. The majority of the party supported the agreement and joined the CDP; however, party leader Fukushima herself was opposed to the merger agreement and remains a member of the Social Democratic Party.

Party policies include:

No. Name
(Birth–death)
Constituency / title Term of office Election results Photo Prime Minister(term)
Took office Left office
Preceding party: Japan Socialist Party(left-wing)
Chair of the Social Democratic Party (1996-present)
1 Tomiichi Murayama
(b. 1924)
Rep for
Ōita 1st
19 January 1996 28 September 1996 - Hashimoto 1996–98
(coalition, confidence and supply)
2 Takako Doi
(1928–2014)
Rep for
Hyōgō 7th
28 September 1996 15 November 2003 -
Obuchi 1998–2000
Mori 2000–01
Koizumi 2001–06
3 Mizuho Fukushima
(b. 1955)
Cou for
National PR
15 November 2003 25 July 2013 -
Abe S. 2006–07
Fukuda Y. 2007–08
Asō 2008–09
Hatoyama Y. 2009–10
(coalition until
30 May 2010)
Kan 2010–11
Noda 2011–12
Abe S. 2012–20
Seiji Mataichi
(b. 1944)
(acting)
Cou for
National PR
(until 28 July 2019)
25 July 2013 14 October 2013 -
4 Tadatomo Yoshida
(b. 1956)
Cou for
National PR
(until 25 July 2016)
(29 July 2019 - present)
14 October 2013 25 February 2018
2013
Tadatomo Yoshida – 9986
Taiga Ishikawa – 2239
2016
Unopposed
5 Seiji Mataichi
(b. 1944)
Cou for
National PR
(until 28 July 2019)
25 February 2018 22 February 2020
2018
Unopposed
6 Mizuho Fukushima
(b. 1955)
Cou for
National PR
22 February 2020 present
2020
Unopposed
Suga 2020–2021
Kishida 2021–present

General election results

Election Leader No. of
seats won
No. of
constituency votes
± % of
constituency votes
No. of
PR block votes
% of
PR block votes
Government
1996 Takako Doi
15 / 500
1,240,649 2.2 3,547,240 6.4 LDP–SDP–NPS coalition (1996-1998)
Opposition (1998-2000)
2000 Takako Doi
19 / 480
2,315,235 4 3.8 5,603,680 9.4 Opposition
2003 Takako Doi
6 / 480
1,708,672 13 2.9 3,027,390 5.1 Opposition
2005 Mizuho Fukushima
7 / 480
996,007 1 1.5 3,719,522 5.5 Opposition
2009 Mizuho Fukushima
7 / 480
1,376,739 0 2.0 3,006,160 4.3 DPJPNP–SDP coalition (2009-2010)
Opposition (2010-2012)
2012 Mizuho Fukushima
2 / 480
451,762 5 0.7 1,420,790 2.3 Opposition
2014 Tadatomo Yoshida
2 / 475
419,347 0 0.7 1,314,441 2.4 Opposition
2017 Tadatomo Yoshida
2 / 465
634,719 0 1.2 941,324 1.7 Opposition
2021 Mizuho Fukushima
1 / 465
313,193 1 0.54 1,018,588 1.77 Opposition

Councillors election results

Election Leader No. of
seats total
No. of
seats won
No. of
National votes
% of
National vote
No. of
Prefectural votes
% of
Prefectural vote
1998 Takako Doi
13 / 252
5 / 126
4,370,763 7.8% 2,403,649 4.3%
2001 Takako Doi
8 / 247
3 / 121
3,628,635 6.63% 1,874,299 3.45%
2004 Mizuho Fukushima
5 / 242
2 / 121
2,990,665 5.35% 984,338 1.75%
2007 Mizuho Fukushima
5 / 242
2 / 121
2,634,713 4.47% 1,352,018 2.28%
2010 Mizuho Fukushima
4 / 242
2 / 121
2,242,735 3.84% 602,684 1.03%
2013 Mizuho Fukushima
3 / 242
1 / 121
1,255,235 2.36% 271,547 0.51%
2016 Tadatomo Yoshida
2 / 242
1 / 121
1,536,238 2.74% 289,899 0.51%
2019 Seiji Mataichi
2 / 242
1 / 121
1,046,011 2.09% 191,820 0.38%

House of Representatives

House of Councillors

Up for re-election in 2022

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Social Democratic Party (Japan)
Social Democratic Party Japan Language Watch Edit This article is about the currently active Japanese political party established in 1996 For other uses see Social Democratic Party Japan disambiguation The Social Democratic Party 社会民主党 Shakai Minshu tō often abbreviated to 社民党 Shamin tō is a political party in Japan that was established in 1996 11 Since its reformation and name change in 1996 it has advocated pacifism and defined itself as a social democratic party 12 It was previously known as the Japan Socialist Party 日本社会党 Nihon Shakaitō abbreviated to JSP in English Social Democratic Party 社会民主党Japanese nameShakai Minshu tōPresidentMizuho FukushimaFounded19 January 1996 25 years ago 1996 01 19 Preceded byJapan Socialist PartyHeadquarters2 4 3 7F Nagata cho Chiyoda ku Tokyo 100 0014IdeologySocial democracy 1 Democratic socialism 2 Progressivism 3 Environmentalism 4 Pacifism 4 Political positionCentre left 5 to left wing 3 6 International affiliationSocialist International 7 Colours Sky blue 8 House of Councillors 9 1 245House of Representatives1 465Prefectural assembly members 10 28 2 614 as of 2020 Municipal assembly members 10 207 29 839 as of 2020 Websitesdp wbr or wbr jpPolitics of JapanPolitical partiesElections The party was refounded in January 1996 by the majority of legislators of the former Japan Socialist Party which was largest opposition party in the 1955 System however most of the legislators joined the Democratic Party of Japan after that Five leftist legislators who did not join the SDP formed the New Socialist Party which lost all its seats in the following elections The SDP enjoyed a short period of government participation from 1993 to 1994 as part of the Hosokawa Cabinet and later formed a coalition government with the Liberal Democratic Party under 81st Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama of the JSP from 1994 to January 1996 The SDP was part of ruling coalitions between January and November 1996 First Hashimoto Cabinet and from 2009 to 2010 Hatoyama Cabinet In the 2019 Japanese House of Councillors election the party won four representatives in the National Diet two in the lower house and two in the upper house In November 2020 the party entered into a merger agreement with the Constitutional Democratic Party 13 Contents 1 History 1 1 Before 2000 1 2 2000s 2010s 2 Policies 3 Leaders 4 Election results 4 1 General election results 4 2 Councillors election results 5 Current Diet members 5 1 House of Representatives 5 2 House of Councillors 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistory EditBefore 2000 Edit Main article Japan Socialist Party In 1995 the former Japan Socialist Party JSP was in a deep crisis Aiming at saving the party the leadership of JSP decided to dissolve the party and to establish a new social democratic party In January 1996 such a new party the Social Democratic Party was established along with the dissolution of JSP De jure JSP changed its name to the Social Democratic Party SDP as an interim party for forming a new party and a movement for transforming the SDP into a new social democratic and liberal party was unsuccessful Under Murayama s successor Ryutarō Hashimoto LDP the SDP remained part of the ruling coalition Long before the disappointing result in the 1996 Japanese general election the party lost the majority of its members of the House of Representatives mainly to predecessors of the Democratic Party of Japan DPJ that was formed in 1996 but also some to the NFP and other opposition parties After its electoral defeat in the 1996 general election when it lost another 15 of its remaining 30 seats in the lower house the SDP left the ruling coalition which it had entered as the second largest force in Japanese politics as a minor party 2000s 2010s Edit The SDP won six seats in the 2003 Japanese general election compared with 18 seats in the previous 2000 Japanese general election Its motives against the Self Defense Forces have reverted into abolishing it in the long term returning into its opposition against the force it had applied in the 1950s Doi had been the leader since 1996 but she resigned in 2003 taking responsibility for the election losses Mizuho Fukushima was elected as the new party leader in November 2003 In the 2004 Japanese House of Councillors election the SDP won only two seats having five seats in the House of Councillors and six seats in the House of Representatives In 2006 the party unexpectedly gained the governorship of the Shiga Prefecture In the 2009 Japanese general election the DPJ made large gains and the SDP maintained its base of 7 seats in the becoming a junior partner in a new government coalition however disagreements over the issue of the Futenma base led to the sacking of Fukushima from the cabinet on 28 May and the SDP subsequently voted to leave the ruling coalition 14 A SDP campaign van outside a station in December 2012 As of October 2010 the SDP had six members in the House of Representatives 15 and four members in the House of Councillors 16 Following the 2012 Japanese general election the party retained only six seats in the whole of the Diet two in the House of Representatives and four in the House of Councillors The count lowered to five seats in 2013 In 2013 the party s headquarters in Nagatacho where the party s predecessor the JSP had moved in 1964 were demolished The headquarters moved to a smaller office in Nagatacho 17 During the nomination period of the 2016 Japanese House of Councillors election the party signed an agreement with the Democratic Communist and People s Life parties to field a jointly endorsed candidate in each of the 32 districts in which only one seat is contested thereby uniting in an attempt to take control of the House from the LDP Komeito coalition 18 The party had two Councillors up for re election and fielded a total of 11 candidates in the election 4 in single and multi member districts and 7 in the 48 seat national proportional representation block 19 In the 2017 Japanese general election the party managed to hold to its two seats it had prior to the election Tadatomo Yoshida declined to run for re election when his term expired in January 2018 Seiji Mataichi was elected unopposed in the ensuing leadership election and took office on 25 February 2018 20 21 On 14 November 2020 the party voted to agree to a merger arrangement with the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan CDP allowing members to leave the SDP and join the latter party The majority of the party supported the agreement and joined the CDP however party leader Fukushima herself was opposed to the merger agreement and remains a member of the Social Democratic Party 22 Policies EditParty policies include 12 23 Defend Article 9 of the Constitution of Japan and declare cities defenseless so that they will not resist in the event of invasion Advocate a significant increase in the scope of social welfare such as healthcare pensions social security and disability care Opposition to neoliberalism and neoconservatism Complete disarmament of Japan in accordance with pacifist principles The Japanese Self Defense Force will be replaced with a force dedicated to disaster relief and foreign aid Cancellation of the United States Japan military alliance dismantling of United States bases in Japan and replacing it with a Treaty of Friendship Opposition to Japan s involvement in supporting the United States in the war against terror through refueling of American warships in the Indian Ocean Introduction of an environmental carbon tax Significant increase in the scope of wildlife protection legislation increasing the number of protected species and setting up of protection zones Transition from a mass production mass consumption society to a sustainable society in coexistence with nature Clampdown on harmful chemicals e g restriction on use of agricultural chemicals ban on asbestos tackling dioxin and soil pollutants Increased investment in public transport encouraging a switch from road to rail and from petrol powered buses to hybrids electric vehicles and light rail transit Opposition to nuclear power and proposal of a gradual switch to wind energy as the nation s base energy source Abolition of the death penalty Opposition to water privatization Legalization of same sex marriage 24 Leaders EditNo Name Birth death Constituency title Term of office Election results Photo Prime Minister term Took office Left officePreceding party Japan Socialist Party left wing Chair of the Social Democratic Party 1996 present 1 Tomiichi Murayama b 1924 Rep for Ōita 1st 19 January 1996 28 September 1996 Hashimoto 1996 98 coalition confidence and supply 2 Takako Doi 1928 2014 Rep for Hyōgō 7th 28 September 1996 15 November 2003 Obuchi 1998 2000Mori 2000 01Koizumi 2001 063 Mizuho Fukushima b 1955 Cou for National PR 15 November 2003 25 July 2013 Abe S 2006 07Fukuda Y 2007 08Asō 2008 09Hatoyama Y 2009 10 coalition until 30 May 2010 Kan 2010 11Noda 2011 12Abe S 2012 20 Seiji Mataichi b 1944 acting Cou for National PR until 28 July 2019 25 July 2013 14 October 2013 4 Tadatomo Yoshida b 1956 Cou for National PR until 25 July 2016 29 July 2019 present 14 October 2013 25 February 2018 2013Tadatomo Yoshida 9986 Taiga Ishikawa 2239 2016Unopposed 5 Seiji Mataichi b 1944 Cou for National PR until 28 July 2019 25 February 2018 22 February 2020 2018Unopposed 6 Mizuho Fukushima b 1955 Cou for National PR 22 February 2020 present 2020Unopposed Suga 2020 2021Kishida 2021 presentElection results EditGeneral election results Edit Election Leader No of seats won No of constituency votes of constituency votes No of PR block votes of PR block votes Government1996 Takako Doi 15 500 1 240 649 2 2 3 547 240 6 4 LDP SDP NPS coalition 1996 1998 Opposition 1998 2000 2000 Takako Doi 19 480 2 315 235 4 3 8 5 603 680 9 4 Opposition2003 Takako Doi 6 480 1 708 672 13 2 9 3 027 390 5 1 Opposition2005 Mizuho Fukushima 7 480 996 007 1 1 5 3 719 522 5 5 Opposition2009 Mizuho Fukushima 7 480 1 376 739 0 2 0 3 006 160 4 3 DPJ PNP SDP coalition 2009 2010 Opposition 2010 2012 2012 Mizuho Fukushima 2 480 451 762 5 0 7 1 420 790 2 3 Opposition2014 Tadatomo Yoshida 2 475 419 347 0 0 7 1 314 441 2 4 Opposition2017 Tadatomo Yoshida 2 465 634 719 0 1 2 941 324 1 7 Opposition2021 Mizuho Fukushima 1 465 313 193 1 0 54 1 018 588 1 77 OppositionCouncillors election results Edit Election Leader No of seats total No of seats won No of National votes of National vote No of Prefectural votes of Prefectural vote1998 Takako Doi 13 252 5 126 4 370 763 7 8 2 403 649 4 3 2001 Takako Doi 8 247 3 121 3 628 635 6 63 1 874 299 3 45 2004 Mizuho Fukushima 5 242 2 121 2 990 665 5 35 984 338 1 75 2007 Mizuho Fukushima 5 242 2 121 2 634 713 4 47 1 352 018 2 28 2010 Mizuho Fukushima 4 242 2 121 2 242 735 3 84 602 684 1 03 2013 Mizuho Fukushima 3 242 1 121 1 255 235 2 36 271 547 0 51 2016 Tadatomo Yoshida 2 242 1 121 1 536 238 2 74 289 899 0 51 2019 Seiji Mataichi 2 242 1 121 1 046 011 2 09 191 820 0 38 Current Diet members EditHouse of Representatives Edit Kantoku Teruya Okinawa 2nd House of Councillors Edit Up for re election in 2022 Mizuho Fukushima National PR See also EditDemocratic Party of Japan Democratic Socialist Party Japan Japan Socialist Party Left Socialist Party of Japan List of political parties in Japan Politics of Japan Right Socialist Party of Japan Itsurō SakisakaNotes Edit Shakai Minshu tō towa 社会民主党 日本 しゃかいみんしゅとう にほん とは kotobank jp in Japanese Retrieved 29 May 2020 from Micropaedia Donald F Busky ed 2010 Democratic Socialism A Global Survey Greenwood Publishing Group p 201 a b 일본 좌파 정당 아 옛날이여 in Korean 시사IN 24 April 2008 Retrieved 26 January 2020 a b 社会民主党宣言 Press release 社会民主党 2006 02 11 The Buraku Issue and Modern Japan The Career of Matsumoto Jiichiro Author Ian Neary P 67 Published by Routledge in London and New York in 2010 Janet Hunter Cornelia Storz ed 2006 Institutional and Technological Change in Japan s Economy Past and Present Routledge Members socialistinternational org Socialist International 29 May 2020 日本に定着するか 政党のカラー Will the colors of political parties settle in Japan in Japanese Nikkei Inc 21 October 2017 Retrieved 29 May 2020 社民党OfficialWeb 議員 Social Democratic Party Archived from the original on 21 July 2015 Retrieved 12 July 2015 a b Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications 30 March 2018 Prefectural and municipal assembly members and chief executives by political party as of 31 December 2017 社会黨 憲法改正要綱 National Diet Library Archived from the original on 24 December 2014 Retrieved 12 July 2015 a b OfficialWebO Social Democratic Party Archived from the original on 31 July 2015 Retrieved 12 July 2015 Social Democratic Party to split most Diet members to join CDPJ The Japan Times 25 February 2018 Retrieved 15 November 2020 BBC News Socialists leave Japan coalition over Okinawa issue Archived 2010 11 03 at the Wayback Machine The House of Representatives National Diet of Japan Archived from the original on 22 March 2011 Retrieved 7 May 2017 List of the Members National Diet of Japan Archived from the original on 22 March 2011 Retrieved 7 May 2017 Japan Times Japan s Social Democratic Party moving HQ out of historic Tokyo building January 27 2013 Archived December 3 2013 at the Wayback Machine Opposition parties activists ink policy pact for Upper House election Japan Times 7 June 2016 Archived from the original on 9 June 2016 Retrieved 23 June 2016 第3極衰退で候補者減 タレント候補10人に Fewer candidates with the demise of the third pole 10 celebrity candidates in Japanese Yomiuri Shimbun 23 June 2016 Retrieved 23 June 2016 Takeshita Yuka 26 January 2018 社民党首選 又市幹事長が無投票で当選 任期は2年間 in Japanese Asahi Shimbun Archived from the original on 27 January 2018 Retrieved 26 January 2018 社民 又市新党首を承認 立民軸の共闘推進へ in Japanese Nihon Keizai Shimbun 25 February 2018 Archived from the original on 27 February 2018 Retrieved 27 February 2018 Social Democratic Party to split most Diet members to join CDPJ The Japan Times 25 February 2018 Retrieved 15 November 2020 社民党OfficialWeb 政策 時系列 Archived from the original on 13 July 2015 Retrieved 12 July 2015 Inada Miho Dvorak Phred Same Sex Marriage in Japan A Long Way Away Archived 2016 06 16 at the Wayback Machine The Wall Street Journal September 20 2013 Retrieved March 31 2014 References Edit This article incorporates public domain material from the Library of Congress Country Studies website http lcweb2 loc gov frd cs External links EditWikimedia Commons has media related to Social Democratic Party of Japan Official website Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Social Democratic Party Japan amp oldid 1053086816, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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