fbpx
Wikipedia

South Swedish highlands

The South Swedish highlands or South Swedish Uplands (Swedish: Sydsvenska höglandet) are a hilly area covering large parts of Götaland in southern Sweden. Except for a lack of deep valleys, the landscape is similar to the Norrland terrain found further north in Sweden. The central-eastern parts of the highlands contain about thirty narrow canyons locally known as skurus.

Aerial view of farms and forest in Ydre Municipality.
The forested landscape of the South Swedish highlands, seen from Skuruhatt in Eksjö Municipality.

Much of the highlands lies above 200 m.a.s.l. and there are large areas around the highlands that exceed 100 m.a.s.l. The highlands are centered on Småland but cover also large swathes of Scania, Halland, Västergötland, Östergötland and Blekinge. The highest point lies 377 m.a.s.l.

Contents

The South Swedish highlands have been populated since the Nordic Stone Age as evidenced by cist findings. During the Nordic Bronze Age (c. 1700–500 BC) there was a significant agricultural expansion across the highlands. Soils developed on glacial till were cleared, with stones then piled in cairns. Other periods of agricultural expansion are the Roman Iron Age and the High Middle Ages (c. 13th century).

Poor soil conditions have posed significant difficulties for agriculture in the highlands, meaning that over time small industries became relatively important in local economies. Many abandoned fields are now covered with forest. Vestiges of abandoned fields can be recognised through the highlands by the characteristic piles of stones made when areas were cleared for cultivation.

The climate of the western parts of the highlands is more humid than on the east. This is due to orographic precipitation caused by southwestern wind forcing moist air over the highlands. Lake Sommen in the northeastern part of the highlands has relatively low humidity and low precipitation. Ljungby in the southwestern parts of the highlands holds the monthly precipitation record for Småland with 347 mm in August 1945. The South Swedish highlands has the records for the coldest and hottest temperatures in Götaland. The cold record is -38.5 °C on January 16 1918 in Lommaryd, while the hot record is 38 °C on June 29, 1947 in Målilla.

Temperatures on Tomtabacken, are lower all year round than those of the surrounding area.

In January the mean daily temperature on the summit falls to around -5°C, which is similar to the temperature in Dalsland or Uppland, both of which are significantly further north. In July the mean daily temperature only reaches around 14°C, comparable with Jokkmokk on the Arctic circle. The annual mean daily temperature is below 5°C, comparable to Östersund, 750 km further north. Although snowfall usually occurs from late October to early May, in the nearby village of Spinkabo measurable snowfall was observed on 30 September 1995 (12 cm) and 14 June 1982 (7 cm). Since only three months have an mean daily temperature exceeding 10°C, the climate qualifies as subarctic. Winter is often the longest season, in higher elevations lasting from mid November until end of March. Galtåsen located far from the coast and on an altitude 360 m.a.s.l. averaging meteorological winter from November 14th until April 2nd. Summer lasts from June 2nd ending on September 3rd.

Climate data for Tomtabacken 1931-1990
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) −2.8
(27.0)
−2.8
(27.0)
1.3
(34.3)
7.5
(45.5)
13.2
(55.8)
17.3
(63.1)
18.5
(65.3)
17.0
(62.6)
13.1
(55.6)
7.6
(45.7)
1.8
(35.2)
−1.5
(29.3)
7.5
(45.5)
Daily mean °C (°F) −5.0
(23.0)
−5.2
(22.6)
−2.4
(27.7)
2.4
(36.3)
8.2
(46.8)
12.5
(54.5)
14.0
(57.2)
12.7
(54.9)
9.1
(48.4)
4.9
(40.8)
0.0
(32.0)
−3.4
(25.9)
4.0
(39.2)
Average low °C (°F) −7.2
(19.0)
−7.6
(18.3)
−5.1
(22.8)
−2.7
(27.1)
3.2
(37.8)
7.7
(45.9)
9.5
(49.1)
8.6
(47.5)
5.2
(41.4)
2.1
(35.8)
−1.8
(28.8)
−5.3
(22.5)
0.5
(32.9)
Source:
Climate data for Galtåsen 361 m.a.s.l. (1931-1990) & extremes since 1901
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) −3.0
(26.6)
−2.6
(27.3)
1.9
(35.4)
7.3
(45.1)
13.4
(56.1)
17.3
(63.1)
17.8
(64.0)
16.9
(62.4)
12.6
(54.7)
7.8
(46.0)
2.0
(35.6)
−1.6
(29.1)
7.5
(45.4)
Daily mean °C (°F) −5.5
(22.1)
−5.5
(22.1)
−2.4
(27.7)
1.9
(35.4)
8.0
(46.4)
12.1
(53.8)
13.4
(56.1)
12.4
(54.3)
8.3
(46.9)
4.8
(40.6)
−0.2
(31.6)
−3.9
(25.0)
3.6
(38.5)
Average low °C (°F) −8.0
(17.6)
−8.4
(16.9)
−6.5
(20.3)
−3.1
(26.4)
2.8
(37.0)
6.9
(44.4)
8.6
(47.5)
8.0
(46.4)
4.4
(39.9)
1.8
(35.2)
−2.8
(27.0)
−6.0
(21.2)
−0.2
(31.6)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 75.3
(2.96)
50.8
(2.00)
60.5
(2.38)
62.6
(2.46)
71.3
(2.81)
80.7
(3.18)
109.8
(4.32)
115.6
(4.55)
103.2
(4.06)
78.1
(3.07)
84.0
(3.31)
73.4
(2.89)
964.4
(37.97)
Source 1: SMHI
Source 2: SMHI Monthly Data 2015-2019
Climate data for Taberg 342 m.a.s.l 2002–2018; extremes since 1901
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) −0.7
(30.7)
−0.7
(30.7)
3.7
(38.7)
10.1
(50.2)
15.4
(59.7)
18.6
(65.5)
21.0
(69.8)
19.4
(66.9)
15.4
(59.7)
8.9
(48.0)
4.1
(39.4)
1.1
(34.0)
9.5
(49.1)
Daily mean °C (°F) −3.6
(25.5)
−3.2
(26.2)
−0.5
(31.1)
4.5
(40.1)
9.4
(48.9)
12.8
(55.0)
15.5
(59.9)
14.3
(57.7)
10.8
(51.4)
5.5
(41.9)
1.7
(35.1)
−1.4
(29.5)
5.5
(41.9)
Average low °C (°F) −6.1
(21.0)
−6.1
(21.0)
−4.8
(23.4)
−1.1
(30.0)
3.2
(37.8)
7.0
(44.6)
9.9
(49.8)
9.2
(48.6)
6.1
(43.0)
2.1
(35.8)
−0.7
(30.7)
−3.8
(25.2)
1.5
(34.7)
Source 1: SMHI Average Data 2002–2018
Source 2: SMHI Open Data

The South Swedish highlands are less exposed to storms than the southern and western coasts of Sweden, yet storms can still be very destructive. The 2005 Cyclone Gudrun was particularly strong, causing much damage to forests in the southwestern part of the highlands. Spruces were particularly hit by Gudrun, while other trees with a more steady root system fared better. Damage was exacerbated by the planting of spruces and practice of clearcutting, which left many trees exposed to the wind. Gudrun also caused blackouts and disabled telecommunications infrastructure through the highlands.

Map centered on the South Swedish highlands.

Within a geological context the highlands are the expression of the South Swedish Dome. The South Swedish Dome has subsided and been uplifted multiple times by epeirogenic movements during the Phanerozoic. The dome has had periods of subsidence, and burial in sediments have alternated with periods of exhumation and the formation of peneplains and hilly relief. The Sub-Cambrian peneplain of Late Neoproterozoic age is the oldest of the surfaces. It covers the eastern and northern flanks of the dome and its crest region where it is up-broken. The Sub-Mesozoic hilly relief covers the southern and western fringes of the dome, corresponding roughly with the counties of Halland, Blekinge and northeastern Scania. The youngest well-defined surface is the South Småland peneplain that formed in the Neogene. In detail the South Swedish Dome has the form of a piedmonttreppen or staircase of erosion surfaces. From top to bottom the levels are:

  • the 100 m a.s.l. surface which is part of the South Småland peneplain

The Late Cenozoic uplift of the dome is tentatively related to far-field compressional stresses that has uplifted the region as a giant anticline-like lithosphere fold. As such it is similar to uplifted passive margins like the Scandinavian Mountains or the mountains of Western and Eastern Greenland.

Last ice age and deglaciation

During the last deglaciation of the Weichselian Ice Sheet the South Swedish highlands was a place of ice flow divergence. Deglaciation of southern Sweden was relatively slow with ice margin retreat rates of less than 150 m/yr. The retreat was interrupted multiple times by small glacier advances. These advances led to the formation of a series of end moraine systems. During deglaciation in southern Sweden glacier ice was mostly warm-based with some lesser parts being cold-based.

At present various lakes in the South Swedish highlands contain planktonic crustacean species that are relics from the time the Weichselian Ice Sheet left the area about 12,000 years ago. Lake Sommen stands out for having as much as three glacial relict crustacean species. These species are Pallasea quadrispinosa, Mysis affinis and Limnocalanus macrurus. Yet the lake lacks the most common relict crustacean found in the lakes of southern Sweden, the Mysis relicta.

  1. This level was considered as part of a post-Silurian peneplain by Sten Rudberg as it could be matched to hills in Västergötland (Kinnekulle, Halleberg, Hunneberg and Billingen). Karna Lidmar-Bergström consider this correlation plausible but the evidence tenuous.
  2. The existence of this surface was first noted by S. Nordlindh in 1924 in a monograph about hydropower and topography.
  3. The South Småland peneplain was first noted by Sten De Geer in 1913.
  1. Lidmar-Bergström, Karna; Olvmo, Mats; Bonow, Johan M. (2017). "The South Swedish Dome: a key structure for identification of peneplains and conclusions on Phanerozoic tectonics of an ancient shield". GFF.
  2. Lundqvist, Jan (1969). "Landskapet". In Lundqvist, Magnus (ed.). Det Moderna Sverige (in Swedish). Bonniers. pp. 64–67.
  3. Olvmo, Mats (2006). "Skuruna i Småland". Geologiskt Forum (in Swedish). 50: 8–11. RetrievedApril 22, 2019.
  4. Åkerhielm, Erik (1912). "Sydsvenska höglandet". Geografien i skildingar och bilder (in Swedish). Lund. pp. 49–90. RetrievedJune 7, 2015.
  5. Lidmar-Bergström, Karna; Bonow, Johan M.; Japsen, Peter (2013). "Stratigraphic Landscape Analysis and geomorphological paradigms: Scandinavia as an example of Phanerozoic uplift and subsidence". Global and Planetary Change. 100: 153–171. Bibcode:2013GPC...100..153L. doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2012.10.015.
  6. "Kulturspår på sydsvenska höglandet". Skogskunskap (in Swedish). November 6, 2016. RetrievedMay 10, 2019.
  7. Lagerås, Per (2013). "Agrara fluktuationer och befolknings-utveckling på sydsvenska höglandet tolkade utifrån röjningsrösen". Fornvännen (in Swedish). 108 (4): 263–277.
  8. "Smålands klimat". SMHI (in Swedish). January 16, 2018. RetrievedMay 10, 2019.
  9. "4. östra Götalands sprickdals- och eklandskap". Skogliga naturvärdesregioner för södra Sverige [Forest biodiversity regions in southern Sweden](PDF) (Report) (in Swedish). Södra. 2015. p. 66.
  10. "Tidiga snöfall i Sverige". Retrieved2016-02-24.
  11. "Sena snöfall i Sverige". Retrieved2016-02-24.
  12. "SMHI". Archived from the original on 2013-02-13.
  13. "Försvarsmakten Open Data for Kvarn, Militärområde" (in Swedish). Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute.
  14. "Monthly and Yearly Statistics" (in Swedish). SMHI. 11 April 2019.
  15. "Monthly & Yearly Statistics". SMHI. Retrieved28 June 2019.
  16. "SMHI öppna data för Huskvarna". SMHI. Retrieved2019-06-30.
  17. "Skogsskador efter Gudrun". SMHI (in Swedish). July 8, 2015. RetrievedMay 10, 2019.
  18. Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Bonow, Johan M.; Erlström, Mikael (2016). "Episodic burial and exhumation of the southern Baltic Shield: Epeirogenic uplifts during and after break-up of Pangaea". Gondwana Research. 35: 357–377. Bibcode:2016GondR..35..357J. doi:10.1016/j.gr.2015.06.005.
  19. Lidmar-Bergström, Karna. "Sydsvenska höglandet". Nationalencyklopedin (in Swedish). Cydonia Development. RetrievedNovember 30, 2017.
  20. Lidmar-Bergström (1988). "Denudation surfaces of a shield area in southern Sweden". Geografiska Annaler. 70 A (4): 337–350.
  21. Japsen, Peter; Chalmers, James A.; Green, Paul F.; Bonow, Johan M. (2012). "Elevated, passive continental margins: Not rift shoulders, but expressions of episodic, post-rift burial and exhumation". Global and Planetary Change. 90–91: 73–86. Bibcode:2012GPC....90...73J. doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2011.05.004.
  22. Lundqvist, Jan; Lundqvist, Thomas; Lindström, Maurits; Calner, Mikael; Sivhed, Ulf (2011). "Svekokarelska Provinsen". Sveriges Geologi: Från urtid till nutid (in Swedish) (3rd ed.). Spain: Studentlitteratur. p. 515. ISBN 978-91-44-05847-4.
  23. Stroeven, Arjen P; Hättestrand, Clas; Kleman, Johan; Heyman, Jakob; Fabel, Derek; Fredin, Ola; Goodfellow, Bradley W; Harbor, Jonathan M; Jansen, John D; Olsen, Lars; Caffee, Marc W; Fink, David; Lundqvist, Jan; Rosqvist, Gunhild C; Strömberg, Bo; Jansson, Krister N (2016). "Deglaciation of Fennoscandia". Quaternary Science Reviews. 147: 91–121. Bibcode:2016QSRv..147...91S. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2015.09.016.
  24. Kinsten, Björn (2010). De glacialrelikta kräftdjurens utbredning i södra Sverige (Götaland och Svealand)(PDF) (Report) (in Swedish). Länsstyrelsen Blekinge län. pp. 1–19. RetrievedApril 19, 2019.

Coordinates:56°59′00″N14°33′00″E /56.9833°N 14.5500°E /56.9833; 14.5500

South Swedish highlands
South Swedish highlands Language Watch Edit The South Swedish highlands or South Swedish Uplands 1 Swedish Sydsvenska hoglandet are a hilly area covering large parts of Gotaland in southern Sweden Except for a lack of deep valleys the landscape is similar to the Norrland terrain found further north in Sweden 2 The central eastern parts of the highlands contain about thirty narrow canyons locally known as skurus 3 Aerial view of farms and forest in Ydre Municipality The forested landscape of the South Swedish highlands seen from Skuruhatt in Eksjo Municipality Much of the highlands lies above 200 m a s l and there are large areas around the highlands that exceed 100 m a s l The highlands are centered on Smaland but cover also large swathes of Scania Halland Vastergotland Ostergotland and Blekinge 4 The highest point lies 377 m a s l 5 Contents 1 History 2 Climate and weather events 3 Geology 3 1 Last ice age and deglaciation 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory EditThe South Swedish highlands have been populated since the Nordic Stone Age as evidenced by cist findings 6 During the Nordic Bronze Age c 1700 500 BC there was a significant agricultural expansion across the highlands Soils developed on glacial till were cleared with stones then piled in cairns 6 7 Other periods of agricultural expansion are the Roman Iron Age and the High Middle Ages c 13th century 7 Poor soil conditions have posed significant difficulties for agriculture in the highlands meaning that over time small industries became relatively important in local economies 6 Many abandoned fields are now covered with forest Vestiges of abandoned fields can be recognised through the highlands by the characteristic piles of stones made when areas were cleared for cultivation 6 Climate and weather events EditThe climate of the western parts of the highlands is more humid than on the east This is due to orographic precipitation caused by southwestern wind forcing moist air over the highlands 8 Lake Sommen in the northeastern part of the highlands has relatively low humidity and low precipitation 9 Ljungby in the southwestern parts of the highlands holds the monthly precipitation record for Smaland with 347 mm in August 1945 8 The South Swedish highlands has the records for the coldest and hottest temperatures in Gotaland 8 The cold record is 38 5 C on January 16 1918 in Lommaryd 8 while the hot record is 38 C on June 29 1947 in Malilla 8 Temperatures on Tomtabacken are lower all year round than those of the surrounding area In January the mean daily temperature on the summit falls to around 5 C which is similar to the temperature in Dalsland or Uppland both of which are significantly further north In July the mean daily temperature only reaches around 14 C comparable with Jokkmokk on the Arctic circle The annual mean daily temperature is below 5 C comparable to Ostersund 750 km further north Although snowfall usually occurs from late October to early May in the nearby village of Spinkabo measurable snowfall was observed on 30 September 1995 12 cm and 14 June 1982 7 cm Since only three months have an mean daily temperature exceeding 10 C the climate qualifies as subarctic 10 11 Winter is often the longest season in higher elevations lasting from mid November until end of March Galtasen located far from the coast and on an altitude 360 m a s l averaging meteorological winter from November 14th until April 2nd Summer lasts from June 2nd ending on September 3rd Climate data for Tomtabacken 1931 1990Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec YearAverage high C F 2 8 27 0 2 8 27 0 1 3 34 3 7 5 45 5 13 2 55 8 17 3 63 1 18 5 65 3 17 0 62 6 13 1 55 6 7 6 45 7 1 8 35 2 1 5 29 3 7 5 45 5 Daily mean C F 5 0 23 0 5 2 22 6 2 4 27 7 2 4 36 3 8 2 46 8 12 5 54 5 14 0 57 2 12 7 54 9 9 1 48 4 4 9 40 8 0 0 32 0 3 4 25 9 4 0 39 2 Average low C F 7 2 19 0 7 6 18 3 5 1 22 8 2 7 27 1 3 2 37 8 7 7 45 9 9 5 49 1 8 6 47 5 5 2 41 4 2 1 35 8 1 8 28 8 5 3 22 5 0 5 32 9 Source 12 Climate data for Galtasen 361 m a s l 1931 1990 amp extremes since 1901Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec YearAverage high C F 3 0 26 6 2 6 27 3 1 9 35 4 7 3 45 1 13 4 56 1 17 3 63 1 17 8 64 0 16 9 62 4 12 6 54 7 7 8 46 0 2 0 35 6 1 6 29 1 7 5 45 4 Daily mean C F 5 5 22 1 5 5 22 1 2 4 27 7 1 9 35 4 8 0 46 4 12 1 53 8 13 4 56 1 12 4 54 3 8 3 46 9 4 8 40 6 0 2 31 6 3 9 25 0 3 6 38 5 Average low C F 8 0 17 6 8 4 16 9 6 5 20 3 3 1 26 4 2 8 37 0 6 9 44 4 8 6 47 5 8 0 46 4 4 4 39 9 1 8 35 2 2 8 27 0 6 0 21 2 0 2 31 6 Average precipitation mm inches 75 3 2 96 50 8 2 00 60 5 2 38 62 6 2 46 71 3 2 81 80 7 3 18 109 8 4 32 115 6 4 55 103 2 4 06 78 1 3 07 84 0 3 31 73 4 2 89 964 4 37 97 Source 1 SMHI 13 Source 2 SMHI Monthly Data 2015 2019 14 Climate data for Taberg 342 m a s l 2002 2018 extremes since 1901Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec YearAverage high C F 0 7 30 7 0 7 30 7 3 7 38 7 10 1 50 2 15 4 59 7 18 6 65 5 21 0 69 8 19 4 66 9 15 4 59 7 8 9 48 0 4 1 39 4 1 1 34 0 9 5 49 1 Daily mean C F 3 6 25 5 3 2 26 2 0 5 31 1 4 5 40 1 9 4 48 9 12 8 55 0 15 5 59 9 14 3 57 7 10 8 51 4 5 5 41 9 1 7 35 1 1 4 29 5 5 5 41 9 Average low C F 6 1 21 0 6 1 21 0 4 8 23 4 1 1 30 0 3 2 37 8 7 0 44 6 9 9 49 8 9 2 48 6 6 1 43 0 2 1 35 8 0 7 30 7 3 8 25 2 1 5 34 7 Source 1 SMHI Average Data 2002 2018 15 Source 2 SMHI Open Data 16 The South Swedish highlands are less exposed to storms than the southern and western coasts of Sweden yet storms can still be very destructive 8 The 2005 Cyclone Gudrun was particularly strong causing much damage to forests in the southwestern part of the highlands 8 17 Spruces were particularly hit by Gudrun while other trees with a more steady root system fared better 17 Damage was exacerbated by the planting of spruces and practice of clearcutting which left many trees exposed to the wind 17 Gudrun also caused blackouts and disabled telecommunications infrastructure through the highlands 8 17 Geology Edit Map centered on the South Swedish highlands Within a geological context the highlands are the expression of the South Swedish Dome 5 The South Swedish Dome has subsided and been uplifted multiple times by epeirogenic movements during the Phanerozoic The dome has had periods of subsidence and burial in sediments have alternated with periods of exhumation and the formation of peneplains and hilly relief The Sub Cambrian peneplain of Late Neoproterozoic age is the oldest of the surfaces It covers the eastern and northern flanks of the dome and its crest region where it is up broken 18 19 The Sub Mesozoic hilly relief covers the southern and western fringes of the dome corresponding roughly with the counties of Halland Blekinge and northeastern Scania The youngest well defined surface is the South Smaland peneplain that formed in the Neogene 18 In detail the South Swedish Dome has the form of a piedmonttreppen or staircase of erosion surfaces From top to bottom the levels are 1 the crestal and upbroken portions of the Sub Cambrian peneplain the 300 m a s l peneplain A the 200 m a s l peneplain containing various inselbergs 19 B the South Smaland peneplain 175 125 m a s l C the 100 m a s l surface which is part of the South Smaland peneplain The Late Cenozoic uplift of the dome is tentatively related to far field compressional stresses that has uplifted the region as a giant anticline like lithosphere fold As such it is similar to uplifted passive margins like the Scandinavian Mountains or the mountains of Western and Eastern Greenland 21 Last ice age and deglaciation Edit During the last deglaciation of the Weichselian Ice Sheet the South Swedish highlands was a place of ice flow divergence 22 Deglaciation of southern Sweden was relatively slow with ice margin retreat rates of less than 150 m yr The retreat was interrupted multiple times by small glacier advances These advances led to the formation of a series of end moraine systems During deglaciation in southern Sweden glacier ice was mostly warm based with some lesser parts being cold based 23 At present various lakes in the South Swedish highlands contain planktonic crustacean species that are relics from the time the Weichselian Ice Sheet left the area about 12 000 years ago 24 23 Lake Sommen stands out for having as much as three glacial relict crustacean species These species are Pallasea quadrispinosa Mysis affinis and Limnocalanus macrurus Yet the lake lacks the most common relict crustacean found in the lakes of southern Sweden the Mysis relicta 24 See also EditBaltic Klint Central Swedish lowland High CoastNotes Edit This level was considered as part of a post Silurian peneplain by Sten Rudberg as it could be matched to hills in Vastergotland Kinnekulle Halleberg Hunneberg and Billingen 1 20 Karna Lidmar Bergstrom consider this correlation plausible but the evidence tenuous 20 The existence of this surface was first noted by S Nordlindh in 1924 in a monograph about hydropower and topography 20 The South Smaland peneplain was first noted by Sten De Geer in 1913 20 References Edit a b c Lidmar Bergstrom Karna Olvmo Mats Bonow Johan M 2017 The South Swedish Dome a key structure for identification of peneplains and conclusions on Phanerozoic tectonics of an ancient shield GFF Lundqvist Jan 1969 Landskapet In Lundqvist Magnus ed Det Moderna Sverige in Swedish Bonniers pp 64 67 Olvmo Mats 2006 Skuruna i Smaland Geologiskt Forum in Swedish 50 8 11 Retrieved April 22 2019 Akerhielm Erik 1912 Sydsvenska hoglandet Geografien i skildingar och bilder in Swedish Lund pp 49 90 Retrieved June 7 2015 a b Lidmar Bergstrom Karna Bonow Johan M Japsen Peter 2013 Stratigraphic Landscape Analysis and geomorphological paradigms Scandinavia as an example of Phanerozoic uplift and subsidence Global and Planetary Change 100 153 171 Bibcode 2013GPC 100 153L doi 10 1016 j gloplacha 2012 10 015 a b c d Kulturspar pa sydsvenska hoglandet Skogskunskap in Swedish November 6 2016 Retrieved May 10 2019 a b Lageras Per 2013 Agrara fluktuationer och befolknings utveckling pa sydsvenska hoglandet tolkade utifran rojningsrosen Fornvannen in Swedish 108 4 263 277 a b c d e f g h Smalands klimat SMHI in Swedish January 16 2018 Retrieved May 10 2019 4 ostra Gotalands sprickdals och eklandskap Skogliga naturvardesregioner for sodra Sverige Forest biodiversity regions in southern Sweden PDF Report in Swedish Sodra 2015 p 66 Tidiga snofall i Sverige Retrieved 2016 02 24 Sena snofall i Sverige Retrieved 2016 02 24 SMHI Archived from the original on 2013 02 13 Forsvarsmakten Open Data for Kvarn Militaromrade in Swedish Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute Monthly and Yearly Statistics in Swedish SMHI 11 April 2019 Monthly amp Yearly Statistics SMHI Retrieved 28 June 2019 SMHI oppna data for Huskvarna SMHI Retrieved 2019 06 30 a b c d Skogsskador efter Gudrun SMHI in Swedish July 8 2015 Retrieved May 10 2019 a b Japsen Peter Green Paul F Bonow Johan M Erlstrom Mikael 2016 Episodic burial and exhumation of the southern Baltic Shield Epeirogenic uplifts during and after break up of Pangaea Gondwana Research 35 357 377 Bibcode 2016GondR 35 357J doi 10 1016 j gr 2015 06 005 a b Lidmar Bergstrom Karna Sydsvenska hoglandet Nationalencyklopedin in Swedish Cydonia Development Retrieved November 30 2017 a b c d Lidmar Bergstrom 1988 Denudation surfaces of a shield area in southern Sweden Geografiska Annaler 70 A 4 337 350 Japsen Peter Chalmers James A Green Paul F Bonow Johan M 2012 Elevated passive continental margins Not rift shoulders but expressions of episodic post rift burial and exhumation Global and Planetary Change 90 91 73 86 Bibcode 2012GPC 90 73J doi 10 1016 j gloplacha 2011 05 004 Lundqvist Jan Lundqvist Thomas Lindstrom Maurits Calner Mikael Sivhed Ulf 2011 Svekokarelska Provinsen Sveriges Geologi Fran urtid till nutid in Swedish 3rd ed Spain Studentlitteratur p 515 ISBN 978 91 44 05847 4 a b Stroeven Arjen P Hattestrand Clas Kleman Johan Heyman Jakob Fabel Derek Fredin Ola Goodfellow Bradley W Harbor Jonathan M Jansen John D Olsen Lars Caffee Marc W Fink David Lundqvist Jan Rosqvist Gunhild C Stromberg Bo Jansson Krister N 2016 Deglaciation of Fennoscandia Quaternary Science Reviews 147 91 121 Bibcode 2016QSRv 147 91S doi 10 1016 j quascirev 2015 09 016 a b Kinsten Bjorn 2010 De glacialrelikta kraftdjurens utbredning i sodra Sverige Gotaland och Svealand PDF Report in Swedish Lansstyrelsen Blekinge lan pp 1 19 Retrieved April 19 2019 Coordinates 56 59 00 N 14 33 00 E 56 9833 N 14 5500 E 56 9833 14 5500 Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title South Swedish highlands amp oldid 1041231887, wikipedia, wiki, book,

books

, library,

article

, read, download, free, free download, mp3, video, mp4, 3gp, jpg, jpeg, gif, png, picture, music, song, movie, book, game, games.