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This article is about the men's team. For the women's team, see Soviet Union women's national football team.

The Soviet Union national football team (Russian:сбо́рная СССР по футбо́лу, tr. sbórnaya SSSR po futbólu) was the national football team of the Soviet Union.

Soviet Union
1924–1991
Nickname(s)Red Army
AssociationFootball Federation of the Soviet Union
Most capsOleg Blokhin (112)
Top scorerOleg Blokhin (42)
Home stadiumLuzhniki Stadium until 1991
FIFA codeURS
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Highest1 (July 1960)
First international
Soviet Union 3–0 Turkey
(Moscow, Soviet Union; 16 November 1924)
Last international
Cyprus 0–3 Soviet Union
(Larnaca, Cyprus; 13 November 1991)
Biggest win
Soviet Union 11–1 India
(Moscow, Soviet Union; 16 September 1955)
Finland 0–10 Soviet Union
(Helsinki, Finland; 15 August 1957)
Biggest defeat
England 5–0 Soviet Union
(London, England; 22 October 1958)
World Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1958)
Best resultFourth place, 1966
European Championship
Appearances6 (first in 1960)
Best resultChampions, 1960

After the breakup of the Union the team was transformed into the CIS national football team. FIFA considers the CIS national football team (and ultimately, the Russia national football team) as the Soviet successor team allocating its former records to them (except for the Olympic records which are not combined due to the IOC policy); nevertheless, a large percentage of the team's former players came from outside the Russian SFSR, mainly from the Ukrainian SSR, and following the breakup of the Soviet Union, some such as Andrei Kanchelskis from the former Ukrainian SSR, continued to play in the new Russia national football team.

The Soviet Union failed to qualify for the World Cup only twice, in 1974 and 1978, and attended seven finals tournaments in total. Their best finish was fourth in 1966, when they lost to West Germany in the semifinals, 2–1. The Soviet Union qualified for five European Championships, winning the inaugural competition in 1960 when they beat Yugoslavia in the final, 2–1. They finished second three times (1964, 1972, 1988), and fourth once (1968), when, having drawn with Italy in the semi-final, they were sent to the third-place playoff match by the loss of a coin toss. The Soviet Union national team also participated in a number of Olympic tournaments earning the gold medal in 1956 and 1988. The Soviet team continued to field its national team players in Olympic tournaments despite the prohibition of FIFA in 1958 to field any national team players in Olympics (players in the Olympics were required to be amateurs at the time, Soviets effectively bent the rules by listing their best players in the military).

Contents

First games

Soviet Union team of 1927

Because of the circumstances, surrounding October Revolution and later the 1917–1922 Russian Civil War, Soviet Russia was internationally diplomatically isolated, making it unable to participate in the international competitions. In 1922 Soviet Russia formed along with its occupation administrations in neighbouring states the Bolshevik state of the Soviet Union. After the civil war, the Soviet Union managed to establish international communication with politically similar factions in Europe and around the globe. The Soviet Union joined the Red Sport International proclaiming any sports events outside of the RSI to be "bourgeoisie sport".

The first international match played by a Soviet team (as Russian SFSR) came in September 1922, when the Finnish Workers' Sports Federation football team toured Russia (Soviet Union was formed at the end of December 1922, Treaty on the Creation of the USSR). The Soviet Russia XI scored a 4–1 victory over the Finns in Petrograd. This was also the first international contact for Soviet sports after the 1917 October Revolution. In May 1923, the Soviet team visited Finland and beat the Finnish squad 5–0. The first match against national team was played in August 1923, nine months after the establishment of the Soviet Union, when a Russian SFSR team beat Sweden 2–1 in Stockholm.

The first match as the actual Soviet Union football team took place a year later, a 3–0 win over Turkey. This and a return match in Ankara were the only officially recognised international matches played by the Soviet Union prior to the 1952 Summer Olympics, though several unofficial friendlies against Turkey took place in the 1930s. The 1952 Olympics was the first competitive tournament entered by the Soviet Union. In the preliminary round, Bulgaria were defeated 2–1, earning a first-round tie against Yugoslavia. Before the match, both Tito and Stalin sent telegrams to their national teams, which showed just how important it was for the two heads of state. Yugoslavia led 5–1, but a Soviet comeback in the last 15 minutes resulted in a 5–5 draw. The match was replayed, Yugoslavia winning 3–1. The defeat to the archrivals hit Soviet football hard, and after just three games played in the season, CDKA Moscow, who had made up most of the USSR squad, was forced to withdraw from the league and later disbanded. Furthermore, Boris Arkadiev, who coached both USSR and CDKA, was stripped of his Merited Master of Sports of the USSR title.

Sweden trials and the triumph

The Soviet Union, coached by Gavriil Khachalin, entered the World Cup for the first time at the 1958 tournament, following a qualification playoff against Poland. Drawn in a group with Brazil, England, and Austria, they collected three points in total, one from England and two from Austria. The Soviet Union and England went to a playoff game, in which Anatoli Ilyin scored in the 67th minute to knock England out. The Soviet Union was then eliminated by the hosts of the tournament, Sweden, in the quarter-finals.

The inaugural European Championships in 1960 marked the pinnacle of Soviet footballing achievement. Easily progressing to the quarter-finals, the team were scheduled to face Spain, but due to the tensions of the Cold War, Spain refused to travel to the Soviet Union, resulting in a walkover. In the semi-final, the Soviet team defeated Czechoslovakia 3–0 and reached the final, where they faced Yugoslavia.

In the final, Yugoslavia scored first, but the Soviet Union, led by legendary goalkeeper Lev Yashin, equalized in the 49th minute. After 90 minutes the score was 1–1, and Viktor Ponedelnik scored with seven minutes left in extra time to give the Soviets the inaugural European Championship.

The end of Kachalin's dream-team

Lev Yashin trying to stop the shot by Argentine striker José Sanfilippo, during the match played at Buenos Aires in 1961. The Soviet Union won 2–1

In the 1962 World Cup, the Soviet team was in Group 1 with Yugoslavia, Colombia, and Uruguay. The match between the Soviet Union and Colombia ended 4–4; Colombia scored a series of goals (68', 72', 86'). Star goalkeeper Lev Yashin was in poor form both against Colombia and Chile. His form was considered one of the main reasons why the Soviet Union team did not gain more success in the tournament.[citation needed]

In 1964, the Soviet Union attempted to defend their European Championship title, defeating Italy in the last 16 (2–0, 1–1) and to reach the quarter-finals. After two matches against Sweden, the Soviet side won on aggregate (1–1, 3–1). The Soviet Union team went to Spain where the finals were held. In the semi-finals, the Soviet Union defeated Denmark 3–0 in Barcelona but their dreams of winning the title again were dashed in the final when Spain, the host, scored a late goal, winning 2–1.

The late 1960s: Semi-finals at World Cup and European Championships

The 1966 FIFA World Cup was the tournament in which the Soviet Union team reached their best result by finishing in fourth place. The Soviet Union was in Group 4 with North Korea, Italy and Chile. In all three matches, the Soviet Union team managed to defeat their rivals. The Soviet team then defeated Hungary in the quarter-finals thanks to the effective performance of their star, Lev Yashin but their success was ended by two defeats on 25 and 28 July, against West Germany in the semi-finals and Portugal in the third-place playoff match, respectively. The 1966 squad was the second-best scoring Soviet team in World Cup history, with 10 goals.

For the Euro 1968, the qualification competition was played in two stages; a group stage (taking place from 1966 until 1968) and the quarter-finals (played in 1968). Again, only four teams could reach the finals which were held in Italy. The semi-final match between the Soviet Union and Italy ended 0–0. It was decided to toss a coin to see who reached the final, rather than play a replay. Italy won, and went on to become European champions. On 8 June 1968, the Soviets were defeated by England in the third-place match.

Kachalin's second attempt

The 1970 World Cup started with the match between Mexico and the Soviet Union. The Soviet team became the first team to make a substitution in World Cup history in this match. Other opponents in their group were Belgium and El Salvador. The Soviet team easily qualified to the quarter-final where they lost against Uruguay in extra time. This was the last time the Soviet Union reached the quarter-finals. They were able to obtain 5th place in the rankings which FIFA released in 1986.

The final tournament of the 1972 European Championships took place between 14 and 18 June 1972. Again, only four teams were in the finals. The Soviets defeated Hungary 1–0, with a second-half goal. The final was between West Germany and the Soviet Union. The match ended with a victory of the German side thanks to the effective football of Gerd Müller. This tournament was one of the two tournaments in which the Soviet Union finished as runner-up.

Failures to qualify in the 1970s

The Soviet Union playing the Argentina at Estadio Monumental, November 1976

After being runners up at Euro 1972, the rest of the 1970s were bleak for the Soviets, who were disqualified from the 1974 World Cup as a result of refusal to play Chile in the aftermath of the 1973 Chilean coup d'état, and failed to qualify for the 1978 World Cup or the 1976 and 1980 European Championships.

Beskov recovers the team

Soviet Union v Belgium at the 1986 World Cup

The 1982 World Cup was the Soviet Union's first major tournament appearance for a decade. The Soviet Union was in Group 6 with Brazil, Scotland, and New Zealand. Goals by Socrates and Eder marked the defeat of the Soviet side against Brazil in the first group match (even though it was a very hard match for the Brazilians), and they were eventually eliminated in the second round by finishing the group in second place when they defeated Belgium only 1–0 and drew against Poland with an 0–0 results. In 1984, the Soviets again failed to qualify for the European Championships, but succeeded in qualifying for the 1986 World Cup. The Soviet Union was in Group C with Hungary, France, and Canada. The Soviets used Irapuato, Guanajuato as their training ground in the World Cup.

The Soviet team enjoyed a successful group stage by scoring nine goals and finishing the group in first place. Ultimately, however, they lost to Belgium 3-4 after extra time in the round of 16. Despite their poor performance in the cup, this team was the best scoring Soviet team in World Cup history, with 12 goals.

Lobanovsky era and demise of Soviet Union

After failing to qualify for three consecutive European Cups (1976, 1980, 1984), the Soviets managed to qualify for the 1988 competition, the last time the Soviet Union national football team took part in the European Football Championship. The finals were held in West Germany, with eight teams participating. Soviet Union finished Group B as leaders above the Netherlands and defeated Italy 2–0 in the semi-final. In the final against the Netherlands, another team from Group B, the Netherlands won the match with a clear score to be crowned European champions.

The final major championship contested by the Soviet team was the 1990 FIFA World Cup, where they were drawn in Group B with Argentina, Romania and Cameroon. The only success for the Soviets came when they defeated group leaders Cameroon 4–0. The Soviets lost their other matches and failed to qualify from the group. The Soviet Union qualified for Euro 1992, but the breakup of the Soviet Union meant that their place was instead taken by the CIS national football team. After the tournament, the former Soviet Republics competed as separate independent nations, with FIFA allocating the Soviet team's record to Russia.

Qualification stage

Group 3

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 Soviet Union 8 5 3 0 14 3 +11 13 Qualify for final tournament 2–0 1–1 2–0 4–0
2 East Germany 8 4 3 1 13 4 +9 11 1–1 0–0 2–0 3–1
3 France 8 1 4 3 4 7 −3 6 0–2 0–1 2–0 1–1
4 Iceland 8 2 2 4 4 14 −10 6 1–1 0–6 0–0 2–1
5 Norway 8 1 2 5 5 12 −7 4 0–1 0–0 2–0 0–1
Source: UEFA

Squad composition

Head coach: Valeriy Lobanovskyi

No. Name Birth date Club QG (G) Games Goals
Goalkeepers
1 Rinat Dasayev (c) 13 June 1957 Spartak Moscow 8 (–3) 5 4
16 Viktor Chanov 21 July 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 1
Defenders
отб.т. Nikolay Larionov 19 February 1957 Zenit Leningrad 1
отб.т. Viktor Losev 25 January 1959 Dynamo Moscow 1
отб.т. Aleksandr Chivadze 8 September 1955 Dinamo Tbilisi 1
отб.т. Aleksandr Bubnov 10 October 1955 Spartak Moscow 1
2 Volodymyr Bezsonov 05 March 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 6 3
3 Vagiz Khidiatullin 3 March 1959 Spartak Moscow 8 (1) 5
4 Oleh Kuznetsov 22 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 7 4
5 Anatoliy Demyanenko 19 February 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 7 4
13 Tengiz Sulakvelidze 23 July 1956 Dinamo Tbilisi 2 (1) 2
19 Serhiy Baltacha 17 February 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 1 1
12 Ivan Vyshnevskyi 21 February 1957 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk
Midfielders
отб.т. Pavlo Yakovenko 19 December 1964 Dynamo Kyiv 6
отб.т. Igor Dobrovolskiy 27 August 1967 Dynamo Moscow 2
отб.т. Vadym Tyshchenko 24 March 1963 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 1
отб.т Ivan Yaremchuk 19 March 1962 Dynamo Kyiv 2
6 Vasyl Rats 25 March 1961 Dynamo Kyiv 7 (1) 5 1
7 Sergei Aleinikov 7 November 1961 Dinamo Minsk 7 (1) 5 1
8 Hennadiy Lytovchenko 11 September 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 5 (1) 4 1
9 Oleksandr Zavarov 26 April 1961 Dynamo Kyiv 6 (2) 5
15 Oleksiy Mykhailychenko 30 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 4 (1) 5 1
18 Sergei Gotsmanov 27 March 1959 Dinamo Minsk 4
14 Vyacheslav Sukristov 1 January 1961 Žalgiris Vilnius
Forwards
отб.т. Oleh Blokhin 5 November 1952 Dynamo Kyiv 4 (1)
отб.т. Sergei Rodionov 3 September 1962 Spartak Moscow 5
отб.т. Vadym Yevtushenko 1 January 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 1
10 Oleh Protasov 4 February 1964 Dynamo Kyiv 5 (1) 5 2
11 Ihor Belanov 25 September 1960 Dynamo Kyiv 6 (4) 4
20 Viktor Pasulko 1 January 1961 Spartak Moscow 2 1
17 Sergei Dmitriev 19 March 1964 Zenit Leningrad

Final stage

Group 2

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 Soviet Union 3 2 1 0 5 2 +3 5 Advance to knockout stage
2 Netherlands 3 2 0 1 4 2 +2 4
3 Republic of Ireland 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 3
4 England 3 0 0 3 2 7 −5 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers

Semifinals

Attendance: 61,606

Final

Main article: UEFA Euro 1988 Final
Attendance: 62,770

Qualification stage

Group 3

Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
Soviet Union 8 4 3 1 11 4 +7 11
Austria 8 3 3 2 9 9 0 9
Turkey 8 3 1 4 12 10 +2 7
East Germany 8 3 1 4 9 13 −4 7
Iceland 8 1 4 3 6 11 −5 6

Squad composition

Head coach: Valeriy Lobanovskyi

No. Name Birth date Club QG (G) Games Goals
Goalkeepers
1 Rinat Dasayev (c) 13 June 1957 Spartak Moscow, Sevilla FC 6 (–2) 1 –2
16 Viktor Chanov 21 July 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 2 (–2)
22 Aleksandr Uvarov 13 January 1960 Dynamo Moscow 2 –2
Defenders
qual. Oleh Luzhnyi 5 August 1968 Dynamo Kyiv 4
qual. Gela Ketashvili 27 September 1965 Dinamo Tbilisi 2
qual. Vasiliy Kulkov 11 June 1966 Spartak Moscow 1
2 Volodymyr Bezsonov 5 March 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 4 2
3 Vagiz Khidiatulin 3 March 1959 Toulouse FC 5 3
4 Oleh Kuznetsov 22 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 6 3
5 Anatoliy Demyanenko 19 February 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 2 1
20 Sergei Gorlukovich 18 November 1961 Lokomotiv Moscow, Borussia Dortmund 7 3
13 Akhrik Tsveiba 11 September 1966 Dynamo Kyiv
19 Sergei Fokin 26 July 1961 CSKA Moscow
Midfielders
qual. Oleksiy Mykhailychenko 30 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 7 (2)
qual. Fyodor Cherenkov 25 July 1959 Spartak Moscow 2
qual. Valdas Ivanauskas 31 July 1966 FK Žalgiris 1
6 Vasyl Rats 25 April 1961 Dynamo Kyiv, RCD Espanyol 6 1
7 Sergei Aleinikov 7 November 1961 Dinamo Minsk, Juventus F.C. 7 3
8 Hennadiy Lytovchenko 11 September 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 8 (3) 3
9 Oleksandr Zavarov 26 April 1961 Juventus F.C. 8 (1) 3 1
11 Igor Dobrovolskiy 27 August 1967 Dynamo Moscow 7 (2) 3 1
15 Ivan Yaremchuk 19 March 1962 Dynamo Kyiv 1 2
17 Andrei Zygmantovich 2 December 1962 Dinamo Minsk 2 2 1
18 Igor Shalimov 2 February 1969 Spartak Moscow 2
21 Valeriy Broshin 19 October 1962 CSKA Moscow
Forwards
qual. Yuriy Savichev 13 February 1965 Torpedo Moscow 3
10 Oleh Protasov 4 February 1964 Dynamo Kyiv 8 (3) 3 1
12 Aleksandr Borodyuk 30 November 1962 Dynamo Moscow, Schalke 04 1 1
14 Vladimir Lyutyi 20 April 1962 Schalke 04 1

Final stage

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 Cameroon 3 2 0 1 3 5 −2 4 Advance to knockout stage
2 Romania 3 1 1 1 4 3 +1 3
3 Argentina 3 1 1 1 3 2 +1 3
4 Soviet Union 3 1 0 2 4 4 0 2
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers

At the final stage of the Euro Championship it already played as CIS national football team

Qualification stage

Group 3

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 Soviet Union 8 5 3 0 13 2 +11 13 Qualify for final tournament 0–0 2–0 2–2 4–0
2 Italy 8 3 4 1 12 5 +7 10 0–0 1–1 3–1 2–0
3 Norway 8 3 3 2 9 5 +4 9 0–1 2–1 0–0 3–0
4 Hungary 8 2 4 2 10 9 +1 8 0–1 1–1 0–0 4–2
5 Cyprus 8 0 0 8 2 25 −23 0 0–3 0–4 0–3 0–2
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. The Soviet Union team was replaced by CIS in the final tournament due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union just after the end of the qualifying stages.

Squad composition

Head coach: Anatoliy Byshovets

No. Name Birth date Club QG (G) Games Goals
Goalkeepers
qual. Aleksandr Uvarov 13 January 1960 Dynamo Moscow, Maccabi Tel Aviv 4
12 Stanislav Cherchesov 2 September 1963 Spartak Moscow 3 (–2)
1 Dmitriy Kharine 16 August 1968 CSKA Moscow 1 3 –4
Defenders
qual. Sergei Gorlukovich 18 November 1961 Borussia Dortmund 1
qual. Vadym Tyshchenko 24 March 1963 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 1
qual. Vasili Kulkov 11 June 1966 Spartak Moscow, S.L. Benfica 8
qual. Dmitriy Galiamin 8 January 1963 CSKA Moscow, RCD Espanyol 5
2 Andrei Chernyshov 7 January 1968 Dynamo Moscow, Spartak Moscow 8 3
4 Akhrik Tsveiba 10 September 1966 Dynamo Kyiv 6 2
5 Oleg Kuznetsov 22 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv, Rangers F.C. 5 (1) 3
16 Dmitriy Kuznetsov 28 August 1965 CSKA Moscow, RCD Espanyol 3 3
3 Kakhaber Tskhadadze 7 September 1968 Spartak Moscow 1
18 Viktor Onopko 14 October 1969 Spartak Moscow 3
20 Andrei Ivanov 6 April 1967 Spartak Moscow 1
Midfielders
qual. Vladimir Tatarchuk 26 July 1961 CSKA Moscow, Slavia Prague 1
qual. Aleksandr Mostovoy 22 August 1968 Spartak Moscow, S.L. Benfica 5 (2)
6 Igor Shalimov 2 February 1969 Spartak Moscow, Foggia Calcio 8 (1) 1
7 Oleksiy Mykhailychenko (c) 30 March 1963 U.C. Sampdoria, Rangers F.C. 8 (2) 3
8 Andrei Kanchelskis 23 January 1969 Shakhtar Donetsk, Manchester United 8 (3) 3
9 Sergei Aleinikov 7 November 1961 U.S. Lecce 6 (1) 2
10 Igor Dobrovolskiy 27 August 1967 Dynamo Moscow, CD Castellón, Servette FC 2 3 1
17 Igor Korneyev 4 September 1967 CSKA Moscow, RCD Espanyol 2 (1) 1
19 Igor Ledyakhov 22 May 1968 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk, Rotor Volgograd, Spartak Moscow
Forwards
qual. Oleh Protasov 4 February 1964 Olympiacos F.C. 4 (1)
qual. Ivan Hetsko 6 April 1968 Chornomorets Odesa 2
11 Sergei Yuran 11 June 1969 Dynamo Kyiv, S.L. Benfica 5 (1) 2
15 Igor Kolyvanov 6 March 1968 Dynamo Moscow, Foggia Calcio 7 2
13 Sergei Kiryakov 1 January 1970 Dynamo Moscow 2
14 Vladimir Lyutyi 20 April 1962 Schalke 04, MSV Duisburg 1

Final stage

Group 2

Team GP W D L GF GA GD Pts
Netherlands 3 2 1 0 4 1 +3 5
Germany 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 3
Scotland 3 1 0 2 3 3 0 2
CIS 3 0 2 1 1 4 –3 2
1958–1989 Home
0
0
1966 WC
(vs North Korea)
0
1970
Home
(vs Belgium)
0
1975
(vs Ireland)
0
0
1982 WC
Home
0
0
1982 WC
Away
0
0
1986
Home
0
0
1986
Away
0
0
1988
Home
1988
Away
1990
Home
1990
Away
1991
Home
1991
Away
1991
Home
1991
Away

FIFA World Cup record

Champions Runners-up Third Place Fourth Place

FIFA World Cup record Qualification Record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads Pld W D L GF GA
1930 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member
1934
1938
1950 Did not enter Did not enter
1954
1958 Quarter-final 7th 5 2 1 2 5 6 Squad 5 4 0 1 18 3
1962 Quarter-final 6th 4 2 1 1 9 7 Squad 4 4 0 0 11 3
1966 Fourth Place 4th 6 4 0 2 10 6 Squad 6 5 0 1 19 6
1970 Quarter-final 5th 4 2 1 1 6 2 Squad 4 3 1 0 8 1
1974 Did not qualify 6 3 1 2 5 4
1978 Did not qualify 4 2 0 2 5 3
1982 Second Group Stage 7th 5 2 2 1 7 4 Squad 8 6 2 0 20 2
1986 Round of 16 10th 4 2 1 1 12 5 Squad 8 4 2 2 13 8
1990 Group Stage 17th 3 1 0 2 4 4 Squad 8 4 3 1 11 4
Total Fourth Place 7/14 31 15 6 10 53 34 53 35 9 9 110 34

UEFA European Championship record

Champions Runners-up Third Place Fourth Place

UEFA European Championship record Qualification Record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads Pld W D L GF GA
1960 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 5 1 Squad 2 2 0 0 4 1
1964 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 4 2 Squad 4 2 2 0 7 3
1968 Fourth Place 4th 2 0 1 1 0 2 Squad 8 6 0 2 19 8
1972 Runners-up 2nd 2 1 0 1 1 3 Squad 8 5 3 0 16 4
1976 Did not qualify 8 4 1 3 12 10
1980 6 1 3 2 7 8
1984 6 4 1 1 11 2
1988 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 7 4 Squad 8 5 3 0 14 3
1992 Qualified, but dissolved and replaced by CIS national football team 8 5 3 0 13 2
Total 1 title 5/8 13 7 2 4 17 12 58 34 16 8 103 41

Olympic record

Olympic record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads
1896–1912 Preceded with Russian Empire
1920–1948 Did not enter
1952 Round 1 14th 3 1 1 1 8 9 Squad
1956 Gold medalists 1st 5 4 1 0 9 2 Squad
1960 Did not qualify
1964
1968
1972 Bronze medalists 3rd 7 5 2 0 17 6 Squad
1976 Bronze medalists 3rd 5 4 0 1 10 4 Squad
Since 1976 Succeeded with Olympic team
Total Gold medalists 4/20 20 14 4 2 44 21
This is a list of honours for the senior Soviet Union national football team

FIFA World Cup

  • Fourth-place (1): 1966

UEFA European Championship

Olympic football tournament

Most appearances
# Player Caps Goals Career
1 Oleg Blokhin 112 42 1972–1988
2 Rinat Dasayev 91 0 1979–1990
3 Albert Shesternev 90 0 1961–1971
4 Anatoliy Demyanenko 80 6 1981–1990
5 Volodymyr Bezsonov 79 4 1977–1990
6 Lev Yashin 78 0 1954–1967
7 Sergei Aleinikov 77 6 1984–1991
8 Murtaz Khurtsilava 69 6 1965–1973
9 Oleg Protasov 68 28 1984–1991
10 Valeriy Voronin 66 5 1960–1968
Top goalscorers
# Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1 Oleg Blokhin 42 112 0.38 1972–1988
2 Oleg Protasov 29 68 0.43 1984–1991
3 Valentin Ivanov 26 59 0.44 1956–1965
4 Eduard Streltsov 25 38 0.66 1955–1968
5 Viktor Kolotov 22 55 0.4 1970–1978
6 Viktor Ponedelnik 20 29 0.69 1960–1966
Igor Chislenko 20 53 0.38 1959–1968
8 Anatoliy Banishevskiy 19 50 0.38 1965–1972
9 Anatoliy Ilyin 16 31 0.52 1952–1959
10 Anatoliy Byshovets 15 39 0.38 1966–1972

  1. Sergei Aleinikov also made four appearances for Belarus.
  2. Oleg Protasov also made one appearance for Ukraine.
Manager Nation Years Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Win % Qualifying cycle Final tour
Boris Arkadiev 1952 3 1 1 1 8 9 33.33 1952(o)
Vasily Sokolov 1954 2 1 1 0 8 1 50
Gavriil Kachalin 1955–1958 34 22 6 6 88 35 64.71 1956(o), 1958, 1960 1956(o), 1958
Georgiy Glazkov 1959 1 1 0 0 3 1 100
Mikhail Yakushin 1959 2 2 0 0 2 0 100 1960
Gavriil Kachalin 1960–1962 22 16 2 4 49 20 72.73 1962 1960, 1962
Nikita Simonyan 1963 1 0 0 1 0 1 0
Konstantin Beskov 1963–1964 9 4 4 1 14 7 44.44 1964 1964
Nikita Simonyan 1964 1 0 1 0 2 2 0
Nikolai Morozov 1964–1966 31 15 9 7 51 33 48.39 1966 1966
Mikhail Yakushin 1967–1968 28 16 7 5 51 31 57.14 1968, 1968(o) 1968
Gavriil Kachalin 1969–1970 18 9 7 2 29 11 50 1970 1970
Valentin Nikolayev 1970–1971 13 8 5 0 24 5 61.54 1972
Nikolay Gulyayev 1972 4 2 1 1 6 4 50 1972
Aleksandr Ponomarev 1972 15 8 4 3 27 17 53.33 1972(o), 1972
German Zonin 1972 3 1 0 2 1 2 33.33
Yevgeny Goryansky 1973 10 3 2 5 6 6 30 1974*
Konstantin Beskov 1974 3 1 0 2 1 4 33.33 1976
Valeriy Lobanovsky 1975–1976 19 11 4 4 33 18 57.89 1976 1976(o)
Valentin Nikolayev 1976 2 0 1 1 0 2 0
Nikita Simonyan 1977–1979 27 18 4 5 60 22 66.67 1978, 1980
Konstantin Beskov 1979–1982 28 17 8 3 54 19 60.71 1980, 1982 1982
Oleg Bazilevich 1979 1 1 0 0 3 1 100
Valeriy Lobanovsky 1982–1983 10 6 3 1 18 6 60 1984
Eduard Malofeyev 1984–1986 25 14 3 8 37 23 56 1986
Valeriy Lobanovsky 1986–1987 17 9 6 2 31 11 52.94 1988 1986
Nikita Simonyan 1988 1 1 0 0 4 0 100
Morozov and Mosyagin 1988 4 1 2 1 5 5 25
1st Coaching Staff 1988–1990 31 16 6 9 42 29 51.61 1990 1988, 1990
2nd Coaching Staff 1990–1992 28 12 11 5 39 24 42.86 1992 1992

Notes:

Since Soviet's first fixture (16 November 1924 vs. Turkey) they have played their home games at various stadiums.

Venue City Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Points per game
Central Lenin Stadium Moscow 1956–1992 78 50 18 10 151 50 2.15
Central Stadium Kiev 1969–1990 12 10 1 1 27 6 2.58
Lenin Dynamo Stadium Tbilisi 1967–1987 10 6 1 3 19 9 1.9
Dynamo Stadium Moscow 1954–1971 9 7 2 0 41 8 2.56
Lokomotiv Stadium Simferopol 1979–1989 4 4 0 0 11 1 3
Kirov Stadium Leningrad 1967–1984 3 3 0 0 8 1 3
Hrazdan Stadium Yerevan 1978 2 2 0 0 12 2 3
Central Lokomotiv Stadium Moscow 1979–1988 2 2 0 0 5 1 3
Central Stadium Volgograd 1977 1 1 0 0 4 1 3
Pakhtakor Central Stadium Tashkent 1975 1 1 0 0 2 1 3
Vorovsky Stadium Moscow 1924 1 1 0 0 3 0 0
Black Sea Shipping Stadium Odessa 1974 1 0 0 1 0 1 0
Totals 1924–1992 123 86 22 15 281 80 2.28
Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only.

Note:

  1. Hentilä, Seppo (1982). Suomen työläisurheilun historia I. Työväen Urheiluliitto 1919–1944. Hämeenlinna: Karisto. pp. 146–148. ISBN 951-23216-0-2.
  2. Hentilä, Seppo (2014). Bewegung, Kultur und Alltag im Arbeitersport (in German). Helsinki: The Finnish Society for Labour History. p. 48. ISBN 978-952-59762-6-7.
  3. "Soviet Union – International Results 1911-1935". RSSSF. Retrieved13 January 2007.
  4. "USSR – Yugoslavia, the Story of Two Different Football Conceptions". http://russianfootballnews.com. Retrieved27 November 2017.External link in |work= ()
  5. "Yugoslavia National Team List of Results 1950-1959". RSSSF. Retrieved13 January 2007.
  6. "USSR – Yugoslavia, the Story of Two Different Football Conceptions". russianfootballnews.com. Retrieved27 November 2017.
  7. "1958 – Qualifying competition". Planet World Cup. Retrieved13 January 2007.
  8. "History. About FUR. General information. FUR". en.rfs.ru. Archived from the original on 9 September 2016.
  9. "European Football Championship 1988 FINAL". euro2000.org. Union of European Football Associations. Archived from the original on 17 August 2000. Retrieved26 December 2017.
  10. Mamrud, Roberto. "Soviet Union/CIS – Record International Players". RSSSF.
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Preceded by
Inaugural champions
European champions
1960 (first title)
Succeeded by

Soviet Union national football team Article Talk Language Watch Edit This article is about the men s team For the women s team see Soviet Union women s national football team The Soviet Union national football team Russian sbo rnaya SSSR po futbo lu tr sbornaya SSSR po futbolu was the national football team of the Soviet Union Soviet Union1924 1991Nickname s Red ArmyAssociationFootball Federation of the Soviet UnionMost capsOleg Blokhin 112 Top scorerOleg Blokhin 42 Home stadiumLuzhniki Stadium until 1991FIFA codeURSFirst coloursSecond coloursFIFA rankingHighest1 July 1960 First international Soviet Union 3 0 Turkey Moscow Soviet Union 16 November 1924 Last international Cyprus 0 3 Soviet Union Larnaca Cyprus 13 November 1991 Biggest win Soviet Union 11 1 India Moscow Soviet Union 16 September 1955 Finland 0 10 Soviet Union Helsinki Finland 15 August 1957 Biggest defeat England 5 0 Soviet Union London England 22 October 1958 World CupAppearances7 first in 1958 Best resultFourth place 1966European ChampionshipAppearances6 first in 1960 Best resultChampions 1960Medal record Men s footballUEFA European Championship1960 France Team1964 Spain Team1972 Belgium Team1988 West Germany TeamMen s Olympics1956 Melbourne Team1972 Munich Team1976 Montreal Team1980 Moscow Team1988 Seoul Team After the breakup of the Union the team was transformed into the CIS national football team FIFA considers the CIS national football team and ultimately the Russia national football team as the Soviet successor team allocating its former records to them except for the Olympic records which are not combined due to the IOC policy nevertheless a large percentage of the team s former players came from outside the Russian SFSR mainly from the Ukrainian SSR and following the breakup of the Soviet Union some such as Andrei Kanchelskis from the former Ukrainian SSR continued to play in the new Russia national football team The Soviet Union failed to qualify for the World Cup only twice in 1974 and 1978 and attended seven finals tournaments in total Their best finish was fourth in 1966 when they lost to West Germany in the semifinals 2 1 The Soviet Union qualified for five European Championships winning the inaugural competition in 1960 when they beat Yugoslavia in the final 2 1 They finished second three times 1964 1972 1988 and fourth once 1968 when having drawn with Italy in the semi final they were sent to the third place playoff match by the loss of a coin toss The Soviet Union national team also participated in a number of Olympic tournaments earning the gold medal in 1956 and 1988 The Soviet team continued to field its national team players in Olympic tournaments despite the prohibition of FIFA in 1958 to field any national team players in Olympics players in the Olympics were required to be amateurs at the time Soviets effectively bent the rules by listing their best players in the military Contents 1 History 1 1 First games 1 2 Sweden trials and the triumph 1 3 The end of Kachalin s dream team 1 4 The late 1960s Semi finals at World Cup and European Championships 1 5 Kachalin s second attempt 1 6 Failures to qualify in the 1970s 1 7 Beskov recovers the team 1 8 Lobanovsky era and demise of Soviet Union 2 UEFA Euro 1988 2 1 Qualification stage 2 1 1 Group 3 2 2 Squad composition 2 3 Final stage 2 3 1 Group 2 2 3 2 Semifinals 2 3 3 Final 3 1990 FIFA World Cup 3 1 Qualification stage 3 1 1 Group 3 3 2 Squad composition 3 3 Final stage 3 3 1 Group B 4 UEFA Euro 1992 4 1 Qualification stage 4 1 1 Group 3 4 2 Squad composition 4 3 Final stage 4 3 1 Group 2 5 Kit evolution 6 Competitive record 6 1 FIFA World Cup record 6 2 UEFA European Championship record 6 3 Olympic record 7 Honours 8 Player records 9 Soviet managers 10 Home venues record 11 See also 12 Notes 13 External linksHistory EditMain article Russian Empire national football team First games Edit Soviet Union team of 1927 Because of the circumstances surrounding October Revolution and later the 1917 1922 Russian Civil War Soviet Russia was internationally diplomatically isolated making it unable to participate in the international competitions In 1922 Soviet Russia formed along with its occupation administrations in neighbouring states the Bolshevik state of the Soviet Union After the civil war the Soviet Union managed to establish international communication with politically similar factions in Europe and around the globe The Soviet Union joined the Red Sport International proclaiming any sports events outside of the RSI to be bourgeoisie sport The first international match played by a Soviet team as Russian SFSR came in September 1922 when the Finnish Workers Sports Federation football team toured Russia Soviet Union was formed at the end of December 1922 Treaty on the Creation of the USSR The Soviet Russia XI scored a 4 1 victory over the Finns in Petrograd This was also the first international contact for Soviet sports after the 1917 October Revolution In May 1923 the Soviet team visited Finland and beat the Finnish squad 5 0 1 2 The first match against national team was played in August 1923 nine months after the establishment of the Soviet Union when a Russian SFSR team beat Sweden 2 1 in Stockholm 3 The first match as the actual Soviet Union football team took place a year later a 3 0 win over Turkey This and a return match in Ankara were the only officially recognised international matches played by the Soviet Union prior to the 1952 Summer Olympics though several unofficial friendlies against Turkey took place in the 1930s The 1952 Olympics was the first competitive tournament entered by the Soviet Union In the preliminary round Bulgaria were defeated 2 1 earning a first round tie against Yugoslavia Before the match both Tito and Stalin sent telegrams to their national teams which showed just how important it was for the two heads of state 4 Yugoslavia led 5 1 but a Soviet comeback in the last 15 minutes resulted in a 5 5 draw The match was replayed Yugoslavia winning 3 1 5 The defeat to the archrivals hit Soviet football hard and after just three games played in the season CDKA Moscow who had made up most of the USSR squad was forced to withdraw from the league and later disbanded Furthermore Boris Arkadiev who coached both USSR and CDKA was stripped of his Merited Master of Sports of the USSR title 6 Sweden trials and the triumph Edit The Soviet Union coached by Gavriil Khachalin entered the World Cup for the first time at the 1958 tournament following a qualification playoff against Poland 7 Drawn in a group with Brazil England and Austria they collected three points in total one from England and two from Austria The Soviet Union and England went to a playoff game in which Anatoli Ilyin scored in the 67th minute to knock England out The Soviet Union was then eliminated by the hosts of the tournament Sweden in the quarter finals The inaugural European Championships in 1960 marked the pinnacle of Soviet footballing achievement Easily progressing to the quarter finals the team were scheduled to face Spain but due to the tensions of the Cold War Spain refused to travel to the Soviet Union resulting in a walkover In the semi final the Soviet team defeated Czechoslovakia 3 0 and reached the final where they faced Yugoslavia In the final Yugoslavia scored first but the Soviet Union led by legendary goalkeeper Lev Yashin equalized in the 49th minute After 90 minutes the score was 1 1 and Viktor Ponedelnik scored with seven minutes left in extra time to give the Soviets the inaugural European Championship The end of Kachalin s dream team Edit Lev Yashin trying to stop the shot by Argentine striker Jose Sanfilippo during the match played at Buenos Aires in 1961 The Soviet Union won 2 1 In the 1962 World Cup the Soviet team was in Group 1 with Yugoslavia Colombia and Uruguay The match between the Soviet Union and Colombia ended 4 4 Colombia scored a series of goals 68 72 86 Star goalkeeper Lev Yashin was in poor form both against Colombia and Chile His form was considered one of the main reasons why the Soviet Union team did not gain more success in the tournament citation needed In 1964 the Soviet Union attempted to defend their European Championship title defeating Italy in the last 16 2 0 1 1 and to reach the quarter finals After two matches against Sweden the Soviet side won on aggregate 1 1 3 1 The Soviet Union team went to Spain where the finals were held In the semi finals the Soviet Union defeated Denmark 3 0 in Barcelona but their dreams of winning the title again were dashed in the final when Spain the host scored a late goal winning 2 1 The late 1960s Semi finals at World Cup and European Championships Edit The 1966 FIFA World Cup was the tournament in which the Soviet Union team reached their best result by finishing in fourth place The Soviet Union was in Group 4 with North Korea Italy and Chile In all three matches the Soviet Union team managed to defeat their rivals The Soviet team then defeated Hungary in the quarter finals thanks to the effective performance of their star Lev Yashin but their success was ended by two defeats on 25 and 28 July against West Germany in the semi finals and Portugal in the third place playoff match respectively The 1966 squad was the second best scoring Soviet team in World Cup history with 10 goals For the Euro 1968 the qualification competition was played in two stages a group stage taking place from 1966 until 1968 and the quarter finals played in 1968 Again only four teams could reach the finals which were held in Italy The semi final match between the Soviet Union and Italy ended 0 0 It was decided to toss a coin to see who reached the final rather than play a replay Italy won and went on to become European champions On 8 June 1968 the Soviets were defeated by England in the third place match Kachalin s second attempt Edit The 1970 World Cup started with the match between Mexico and the Soviet Union The Soviet team became the first team to make a substitution in World Cup history in this match Other opponents in their group were Belgium and El Salvador The Soviet team easily qualified to the quarter final where they lost against Uruguay in extra time This was the last time the Soviet Union reached the quarter finals They were able to obtain 5th place in the rankings which FIFA released in 1986 The final tournament of the 1972 European Championships took place between 14 and 18 June 1972 Again only four teams were in the finals The Soviets defeated Hungary 1 0 with a second half goal The final was between West Germany and the Soviet Union The match ended with a victory of the German side thanks to the effective football of Gerd Muller This tournament was one of the two tournaments in which the Soviet Union finished as runner up Failures to qualify in the 1970s Edit The Soviet Union playing the Argentina at Estadio Monumental November 1976 After being runners up at Euro 1972 the rest of the 1970s were bleak for the Soviets who were disqualified from the 1974 World Cup as a result of refusal to play Chile in the aftermath of the 1973 Chilean coup d etat and failed to qualify for the 1978 World Cup or the 1976 and 1980 European Championships Beskov recovers the team Edit Soviet Union v Belgium at the 1986 World Cup The 1982 World Cup was the Soviet Union s first major tournament appearance for a decade The Soviet Union was in Group 6 with Brazil Scotland and New Zealand Goals by Socrates and Eder marked the defeat of the Soviet side against Brazil in the first group match even though it was a very hard match for the Brazilians and they were eventually eliminated in the second round by finishing the group in second place when they defeated Belgium only 1 0 and drew against Poland with an 0 0 results In 1984 the Soviets again failed to qualify for the European Championships but succeeded in qualifying for the 1986 World Cup The Soviet Union was in Group C with Hungary France and Canada The Soviets used Irapuato Guanajuato as their training ground in the World Cup The Soviet team enjoyed a successful group stage by scoring nine goals and finishing the group in first place Ultimately however they lost to Belgium 3 4 after extra time in the round of 16 Despite their poor performance in the cup this team was the best scoring Soviet team in World Cup history with 12 goals Lobanovsky era and demise of Soviet Union Edit After failing to qualify for three consecutive European Cups 1976 1980 1984 the Soviets managed to qualify for the 1988 competition the last time the Soviet Union national football team took part in the European Football Championship The finals were held in West Germany with eight teams participating Soviet Union finished Group B as leaders above the Netherlands and defeated Italy 2 0 in the semi final In the final against the Netherlands another team from Group B the Netherlands won the match with a clear score to be crowned European champions The final major championship contested by the Soviet team was the 1990 FIFA World Cup where they were drawn in Group B with Argentina Romania and Cameroon The only success for the Soviets came when they defeated group leaders Cameroon 4 0 The Soviets lost their other matches and failed to qualify from the group The Soviet Union qualified for Euro 1992 but the breakup of the Soviet Union meant that their place was instead taken by the CIS national football team After the tournament the former Soviet Republics competed as separate independent nations with FIFA allocating the Soviet team s record to Russia 8 UEFA Euro 1988 EditQualification stage Edit Group 3 Edit Main article UEFA Euro 1988 qualifying Group 3 Pos Teamvte Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification 1 Soviet Union 8 5 3 0 14 3 11 13 Qualify for final tournament 2 0 1 1 2 0 4 02 East Germany 8 4 3 1 13 4 9 11 1 1 0 0 2 0 3 13 France 8 1 4 3 4 7 3 6 0 2 0 1 2 0 1 14 Iceland 8 2 2 4 4 14 10 6 1 1 0 6 0 0 2 15 Norway 8 1 2 5 5 12 7 4 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 Source UEFA Squad composition Edit Head coach Valeriy Lobanovskyi No Name Birth date Club QG G Games GoalsGoalkeepers1 Rinat Dasayev c 13 June 1957 Spartak Moscow 8 3 5 416 Viktor Chanov 21 July 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 1Defendersotb t Nikolay Larionov 19 February 1957 Zenit Leningrad 1otb t Viktor Losev 25 January 1959 Dynamo Moscow 1otb t Aleksandr Chivadze 8 September 1955 Dinamo Tbilisi 1otb t Aleksandr Bubnov 10 October 1955 Spartak Moscow 12 Volodymyr Bezsonov 05 March 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 6 33 Vagiz Khidiatullin 3 March 1959 Spartak Moscow 8 1 54 Oleh Kuznetsov 22 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 7 45 Anatoliy Demyanenko 19 February 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 7 413 Tengiz Sulakvelidze 23 July 1956 Dinamo Tbilisi 2 1 219 Serhiy Baltacha 17 February 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 1 112 Ivan Vyshnevskyi 21 February 1957 Dnipro DnipropetrovskMidfieldersotb t Pavlo Yakovenko 19 December 1964 Dynamo Kyiv 6otb t Igor Dobrovolskiy 27 August 1967 Dynamo Moscow 2otb t Vadym Tyshchenko 24 March 1963 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 1otb t Ivan Yaremchuk 19 March 1962 Dynamo Kyiv 26 Vasyl Rats 25 March 1961 Dynamo Kyiv 7 1 5 17 Sergei Aleinikov 7 November 1961 Dinamo Minsk 7 1 5 18 Hennadiy Lytovchenko 11 September 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 5 1 4 19 Oleksandr Zavarov 26 April 1961 Dynamo Kyiv 6 2 515 Oleksiy Mykhailychenko 30 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 4 1 5 118 Sergei Gotsmanov 27 March 1959 Dinamo Minsk 414 Vyacheslav Sukristov 1 January 1961 Zalgiris VilniusForwardsotb t Oleh Blokhin 5 November 1952 Dynamo Kyiv 4 1 otb t Sergei Rodionov 3 September 1962 Spartak Moscow 5otb t Vadym Yevtushenko 1 January 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 110 Oleh Protasov 4 February 1964 Dynamo Kyiv 5 1 5 211 Ihor Belanov 25 September 1960 Dynamo Kyiv 6 4 420 Viktor Pasulko 1 January 1961 Spartak Moscow 2 117 Sergei Dmitriev 19 March 1964 Zenit LeningradFinal stage Edit Group 2 Edit Main article UEFA Euro 1988 Group 2 Pos Teamvte Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification1 Soviet Union 3 2 1 0 5 2 3 5 Advance to knockout stage2 Netherlands 3 2 0 1 4 2 2 43 Republic of Ireland 3 1 1 1 2 2 0 34 England 3 0 0 3 2 7 5 0Source UEFA Rules for classification Group stage tiebreakers Semifinals Edit 22 June 1988 1988 06 22 20 15Soviet Union 2 0 ItalyLytovchenko 58 Protasov 62 ReportNeckarstadion StuttgartAttendance 61 606Referee Alexis Ponnet Belgium Final Edit Main article UEFA Euro 1988 Final 25 June 1988 1988 06 25 15 30Soviet Union 0 2 NetherlandsReport Gullit 32 Van Basten 54 Olympiastadion MunichAttendance 62 770 9 Referee Michel Vautrot France 1990 FIFA World Cup EditQualification stage Edit Group 3 Edit Main article 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification UEFA Group 3 Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Soviet Union 8 4 3 1 11 4 7 11 Austria 8 3 3 2 9 9 0 9 Turkey 8 3 1 4 12 10 2 7 East Germany 8 3 1 4 9 13 4 7 Iceland 8 1 4 3 6 11 5 6 Austria 3 0 2 1 0 0 3 2East Germany 1 1 2 0 2 1 0 2Iceland 0 0 0 3 1 1 2 1Soviet Union 2 0 3 0 1 1 2 0Turkey 3 0 3 1 1 1 0 1 Squad composition Edit Head coach Valeriy Lobanovskyi No Name Birth date Club QG G Games GoalsGoalkeepers1 Rinat Dasayev c 13 June 1957 Spartak Moscow Sevilla FC 6 2 1 216 Viktor Chanov 21 July 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 2 2 22 Aleksandr Uvarov 13 January 1960 Dynamo Moscow 2 2Defendersqual Oleh Luzhnyi 5 August 1968 Dynamo Kyiv 4qual Gela Ketashvili 27 September 1965 Dinamo Tbilisi 2qual Vasiliy Kulkov 11 June 1966 Spartak Moscow 12 Volodymyr Bezsonov 5 March 1958 Dynamo Kyiv 4 23 Vagiz Khidiatulin 3 March 1959 Toulouse FC 5 34 Oleh Kuznetsov 22 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 6 35 Anatoliy Demyanenko 19 February 1959 Dynamo Kyiv 2 120 Sergei Gorlukovich 18 November 1961 Lokomotiv Moscow Borussia Dortmund 7 313 Akhrik Tsveiba 11 September 1966 Dynamo Kyiv19 Sergei Fokin 26 July 1961 CSKA MoscowMidfieldersqual Oleksiy Mykhailychenko 30 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 7 2 qual Fyodor Cherenkov 25 July 1959 Spartak Moscow 2qual Valdas Ivanauskas 31 July 1966 FK Zalgiris 16 Vasyl Rats 25 April 1961 Dynamo Kyiv RCD Espanyol 6 17 Sergei Aleinikov 7 November 1961 Dinamo Minsk Juventus F C 7 38 Hennadiy Lytovchenko 11 September 1963 Dynamo Kyiv 8 3 39 Oleksandr Zavarov 26 April 1961 Juventus F C 8 1 3 111 Igor Dobrovolskiy 27 August 1967 Dynamo Moscow 7 2 3 115 Ivan Yaremchuk 19 March 1962 Dynamo Kyiv 1 217 Andrei Zygmantovich 2 December 1962 Dinamo Minsk 2 2 118 Igor Shalimov 2 February 1969 Spartak Moscow 221 Valeriy Broshin 19 October 1962 CSKA MoscowForwardsqual Yuriy Savichev 13 February 1965 Torpedo Moscow 310 Oleh Protasov 4 February 1964 Dynamo Kyiv 8 3 3 112 Aleksandr Borodyuk 30 November 1962 Dynamo Moscow Schalke 04 1 114 Vladimir Lyutyi 20 April 1962 Schalke 04 1Final stage Edit Group B Edit Main article 1990 FIFA World Cup Group B Pos Teamvte Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification1 Cameroon 3 2 0 1 3 5 2 4 Advance to knockout stage2 Romania 3 1 1 1 4 3 1 33 Argentina 3 1 1 1 3 2 1 34 Soviet Union 3 1 0 2 4 4 0 2Source FIFA Rules for classification Group stage tiebreakersUEFA Euro 1992 EditAt the final stage of the Euro Championship it already played as CIS national football team Qualification stage Edit Group 3 Edit Pos Teamvte Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification 1 Soviet Union a 8 5 3 0 13 2 11 13 Qualify for final tournament 0 0 2 0 2 2 4 02 Italy 8 3 4 1 12 5 7 10 0 0 1 1 3 1 2 03 Norway 8 3 3 2 9 5 4 9 0 1 2 1 0 0 3 04 Hungary 8 2 4 2 10 9 1 8 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 25 Cyprus 8 0 0 8 2 25 23 0 0 3 0 4 0 3 0 2 Source UEFA Notes The Soviet Union team was replaced by CIS in the final tournament due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union just after the end of the qualifying stages Squad composition Edit Head coach Anatoliy Byshovets No Name Birth date Club QG G Games GoalsGoalkeepersqual Aleksandr Uvarov 13 January 1960 Dynamo Moscow Maccabi Tel Aviv 412 Stanislav Cherchesov 2 September 1963 Spartak Moscow 3 2 1 Dmitriy Kharine 16 August 1968 CSKA Moscow 1 3 4Defendersqual Sergei Gorlukovich 18 November 1961 Borussia Dortmund 1qual Vadym Tyshchenko 24 March 1963 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk 1qual Vasili Kulkov 11 June 1966 Spartak Moscow S L Benfica 8qual Dmitriy Galiamin 8 January 1963 CSKA Moscow RCD Espanyol 52 Andrei Chernyshov 7 January 1968 Dynamo Moscow Spartak Moscow 8 34 Akhrik Tsveiba 10 September 1966 Dynamo Kyiv 6 25 Oleg Kuznetsov 22 March 1963 Dynamo Kyiv Rangers F C 5 1 316 Dmitriy Kuznetsov 28 August 1965 CSKA Moscow RCD Espanyol 3 33 Kakhaber Tskhadadze 7 September 1968 Spartak Moscow 118 Viktor Onopko 14 October 1969 Spartak Moscow 320 Andrei Ivanov 6 April 1967 Spartak Moscow 1Midfieldersqual Vladimir Tatarchuk 26 July 1961 CSKA Moscow Slavia Prague 1qual Aleksandr Mostovoy 22 August 1968 Spartak Moscow S L Benfica 5 2 6 Igor Shalimov 2 February 1969 Spartak Moscow Foggia Calcio 8 1 17 Oleksiy Mykhailychenko c 30 March 1963 U C Sampdoria Rangers F C 8 2 38 Andrei Kanchelskis 23 January 1969 Shakhtar Donetsk Manchester United 8 3 39 Sergei Aleinikov 7 November 1961 U S Lecce 6 1 210 Igor Dobrovolskiy 27 August 1967 Dynamo Moscow CD Castellon Servette FC 2 3 117 Igor Korneyev 4 September 1967 CSKA Moscow RCD Espanyol 2 1 119 Igor Ledyakhov 22 May 1968 Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk Rotor Volgograd Spartak MoscowForwardsqual Oleh Protasov 4 February 1964 Olympiacos F C 4 1 qual Ivan Hetsko 6 April 1968 Chornomorets Odesa 211 Sergei Yuran 11 June 1969 Dynamo Kyiv S L Benfica 5 1 215 Igor Kolyvanov 6 March 1968 Dynamo Moscow Foggia Calcio 7 213 Sergei Kiryakov 1 January 1970 Dynamo Moscow 214 Vladimir Lyutyi 20 April 1962 Schalke 04 MSV Duisburg 1Final stage Edit Group 2 Edit Team GP W D L GF GA GD Pts Netherlands 3 2 1 0 4 1 3 5 Germany 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 3 Scotland 3 1 0 2 3 3 0 2 CIS 3 0 2 1 1 4 3 2Kit evolution Edit 1958 1989 Home 0 0 1966 WC vs North Korea 0 1970 Home vs Belgium 0 1975 vs Ireland 0 0 1982 WC Home 0 0 1982 WC Away 0 0 1986 Home 0 0 1986 Away 0 0 1988 Home 1988 Away 1988 Olympics 1990 Home 1990 Away 1991 Home 1991 Away 1991 Home 1991 AwayCompetitive record EditFIFA World Cup record Edit Main article Soviet Union at the FIFA World Cup Champions Runners up Third Place Fourth Place FIFA World Cup record Qualification RecordYear Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads Pld W D L GF GA 1930 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member 1934 1938 1950 Did not enter Did not enter 1954 1958 Quarter final 7th 5 2 1 2 5 6 Squad 5 4 0 1 18 3 1962 Quarter final 6th 4 2 1 1 9 7 Squad 4 4 0 0 11 3 1966 Fourth Place 4th 6 4 0 2 10 6 Squad 6 5 0 1 19 6 1970 Quarter final 5th 4 2 1 1 6 2 Squad 4 3 1 0 8 1 1974 Did not qualify 6 3 1 2 5 4 1978 Did not qualify 4 2 0 2 5 3 1982 Second Group Stage 7th 5 2 2 1 7 4 Squad 8 6 2 0 20 2 1986 Round of 16 10th 4 2 1 1 12 5 Squad 8 4 2 2 13 8 1990 Group Stage 17th 3 1 0 2 4 4 Squad 8 4 3 1 11 4Total Fourth Place 7 14 31 15 6 10 53 34 53 35 9 9 110 34UEFA European Championship record Edit Champions Runners up Third Place Fourth Place UEFA European Championship record Qualification RecordYear Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads Pld W D L GF GA 1960 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 5 1 Squad 2 2 0 0 4 1 1964 Runners up 2nd 2 1 0 1 4 2 Squad 4 2 2 0 7 3 1968 Fourth Place 4th 2 0 1 1 0 2 Squad 8 6 0 2 19 8 1972 Runners up 2nd 2 1 0 1 1 3 Squad 8 5 3 0 16 4 1976 Did not qualify 8 4 1 3 12 10 1980 6 1 3 2 7 8 1984 6 4 1 1 11 2 1988 Runners up 2nd 5 3 1 1 7 4 Squad 8 5 3 0 14 3 1992 Qualified but dissolved and replaced by CIS national football team 8 5 3 0 13 2Total 1 title 5 8 13 7 2 4 17 12 58 34 16 8 103 41Olympic record Edit Olympic recordYear Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squads1896 1912 Preceded with Russian Empire1920 1948 Did not enter 1952 Round 1 14th 3 1 1 1 8 9 Squad 1956 Gold medalists 1st 5 4 1 0 9 2 Squad 1960 Did not qualify 1964 1968 1972 Bronze medalists 3rd 7 5 2 0 17 6 Squad 1976 Bronze medalists 3rd 5 4 0 1 10 4 SquadSince 1976 Succeeded with Olympic teamTotal Gold medalists 4 20 20 14 4 2 44 21 Honours EditThis is a list of honours for the senior Soviet Union national football team FIFA World Cup Fourth place 1 1966 UEFA European Championship Winners 1 1960 Runner up 3 1964 1972 1988 Fourth place 1 1968 Olympic football tournament Gold Medal 2 1956 1988 Bronze Medal 3 1972 1976 1980Player records EditMost appearances 10 Player Caps Goals Career1 Oleg Blokhin 112 42 1972 19882 Rinat Dasayev 91 0 1979 19903 Albert Shesternev 90 0 1961 19714 Anatoliy Demyanenko 80 6 1981 19905 Volodymyr Bezsonov 79 4 1977 19906 Lev Yashin 78 0 1954 19677 Sergei Aleinikov a 77 6 1984 19918 Murtaz Khurtsilava 69 6 1965 19739 Oleg Protasov b 68 28 1984 199110 Valeriy Voronin 66 5 1960 1968 Top goalscorers 10 Player Goals Caps Ratio Career1 Oleg Blokhin 42 112 0 38 1972 19882 Oleg Protasov b 29 68 0 43 1984 19913 Valentin Ivanov 26 59 0 44 1956 19654 Eduard Streltsov 25 38 0 66 1955 19685 Viktor Kolotov 22 55 0 4 1970 19786 Viktor Ponedelnik 20 29 0 69 1960 1966Igor Chislenko 20 53 0 38 1959 19688 Anatoliy Banishevskiy 19 50 0 38 1965 19729 Anatoliy Ilyin 16 31 0 52 1952 195910 Anatoliy Byshovets 15 39 0 38 1966 1972 Sergei Aleinikov also made four appearances for Belarus a b Oleg Protasov also made one appearance for Ukraine Soviet managers EditManager Nation Years Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Win Qualifying cycle Final tourBoris Arkadiev 1952 3 1 1 1 8 9 33 33 1952 o Vasily Sokolov 1954 2 1 1 0 8 1 50Gavriil Kachalin 1955 1958 34 22 6 6 88 35 64 71 1956 o 1958 1960 1956 o 1958Georgiy Glazkov 1959 1 1 0 0 3 1 100Mikhail Yakushin 1959 2 2 0 0 2 0 100 1960Gavriil Kachalin 1960 1962 22 16 2 4 49 20 72 73 1962 1960 1962Nikita Simonyan 1963 1 0 0 1 0 1 0Konstantin Beskov 1963 1964 9 4 4 1 14 7 44 44 1964 1964Nikita Simonyan 1964 1 0 1 0 2 2 0Nikolai Morozov 1964 1966 31 15 9 7 51 33 48 39 1966 1966Mikhail Yakushin 1967 1968 28 16 7 5 51 31 57 14 1968 1968 o 1968Gavriil Kachalin 1969 1970 18 9 7 2 29 11 50 1970 1970Valentin Nikolayev 1970 1971 13 8 5 0 24 5 61 54 1972Nikolay Gulyayev 1972 4 2 1 1 6 4 50 1972Aleksandr Ponomarev 1972 15 8 4 3 27 17 53 33 1972 o 1972German Zonin 1972 3 1 0 2 1 2 33 33Yevgeny Goryansky 1973 10 3 2 5 6 6 30 1974 Konstantin Beskov 1974 3 1 0 2 1 4 33 33 1976Valeriy Lobanovsky 1975 1976 19 11 4 4 33 18 57 89 1976 1976 o Valentin Nikolayev 1976 2 0 1 1 0 2 0Nikita Simonyan 1977 1979 27 18 4 5 60 22 66 67 1978 1980Konstantin Beskov 1979 1982 28 17 8 3 54 19 60 71 1980 1982 1982Oleg Bazilevich 1979 1 1 0 0 3 1 100Valeriy Lobanovsky 1982 1983 10 6 3 1 18 6 60 1984Eduard Malofeyev 1984 1986 25 14 3 8 37 23 56 1986Valeriy Lobanovsky 1986 1987 17 9 6 2 31 11 52 94 1988 1986Nikita Simonyan 1988 1 1 0 0 4 0 100Morozov and Mosyagin 1988 4 1 2 1 5 5 251st Coaching Staff 1988 1990 31 16 6 9 42 29 51 61 1990 1988 19902nd Coaching Staff 1990 1992 28 12 11 5 39 24 42 86 1992 1992 Notes The game that took place on 21 November 1973 between the national team of Chile and missing side did not go on record of Yevgeny Goryansky The 1980 USSR Olympic roster coach Beskov was identical with the senior team that competed in qualification tournaments in 1979 1981 In 1985 1989 the national team competed in the annual Nehru Cup India The 1st coaching staff consisted of Valeriy Lobanovsky leading Yuri Morozov and Sergei Mosyagin The 2nd coaching staff consisted of Anatoly Byshovets leading Vladimir Salkov and Gadzhi Gadzhiyev Home venues record EditSince Soviet s first fixture 16 November 1924 vs Turkey they have played their home games at various stadiums Venue City Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA Points per gameCentral Lenin Stadium Moscow 1956 1992 78 50 18 10 151 50 2 15Central Stadium Kiev 1969 1990 12 10 1 1 27 6 2 58Lenin Dynamo Stadium Tbilisi 1967 1987 10 6 1 3 19 9 1 9Dynamo Stadium Moscow 1954 1971 9 7 2 0 41 8 2 56Lokomotiv Stadium Simferopol 1979 1989 4 4 0 0 11 1 3Kirov Stadium Leningrad 1967 1984 3 3 0 0 8 1 3Hrazdan Stadium Yerevan 1978 2 2 0 0 12 2 3Central Lokomotiv Stadium Moscow 1979 1988 2 2 0 0 5 1 3Central Stadium Volgograd 1977 1 1 0 0 4 1 3Pakhtakor Central Stadium Tashkent 1975 1 1 0 0 2 1 3Vorovsky Stadium Moscow 1924 1 1 0 0 3 0 0Black Sea Shipping Stadium Odessa 1974 1 0 0 1 0 1 0Totals 1924 1992 123 86 22 15 281 80 2 28Statistics include official FIFA recognised matches only Note Although never used by either the Soviet Union national football team nor Soviet Union Olympic football team Dinamo Stadium in Minsk was designated as the official stadium for the 1980 Summer Olympics See also Edit Association football portal Soviet Union portal Russia national football team CIS national football team Soviet Union national under 21 football team Soviet Union national under 18 football team Soviet Union national under 16 football team Soviet Union women s national football team Soviet Union national football team all time recordNotes Edit Hentila Seppo 1982 Suomen tyolaisurheilun historia I Tyovaen Urheiluliitto 1919 1944 Hameenlinna Karisto pp 146 148 ISBN 951 23216 0 2 Hentila Seppo 2014 Bewegung Kultur und Alltag im Arbeitersport in German Helsinki The Finnish Society for Labour History p 48 ISBN 978 952 59762 6 7 Soviet Union International Results 1911 1935 RSSSF Retrieved 13 January 2007 USSR Yugoslavia the Story of Two Different Football Conceptions http russianfootballnews com Retrieved 27 November 2017 External link in work help Yugoslavia National Team List of Results 1950 1959 RSSSF Retrieved 13 January 2007 USSR Yugoslavia the Story of Two Different Football Conceptions russianfootballnews com Retrieved 27 November 2017 1958 Qualifying competition Planet World Cup Retrieved 13 January 2007 History About FUR General information FUR en rfs ru Archived from the original on 9 September 2016 European Football Championship 1988 FINAL euro2000 org Union of European Football Associations Archived from the original on 17 August 2000 Retrieved 26 December 2017 a b Mamrud Roberto Soviet Union CIS Record International Players RSSSF External links EditWikimedia Commons has media related to Soviet Union national association football team RSSSF archive of results 1923 1991 92 RSSSF archive of most capped players and highest goalscorers Football in Soviet Union Russia Team Profile including old Soviet Union World Cup qualifications Russia Soviet Union National Football Team Team history Media Biblioteca of USSR National Football Team Media Biblioteca of USSR National Football Team in VKPreceded byInaugural champions European champions 1960 first title Succeeded by1964 Spain Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Soviet Union national football team amp oldid 1063983945, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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