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Sovietization

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Sovietization (Russian: Советизация) is the adoption of a political system based on the model of soviets (workers' councils) or the adoption of a way of life, mentality, and culture modelled after the Soviet Union. This often included adopting Cyrillic script, and sometimes also the Russian language.

Latvian National Theatre decorated with Soviet symbols (hammer and sickle, red star, red flags and a double portrait of Lenin and Stalin) after the Soviet occupation in 1940. The text on top reads "Long live USSR!"

A notable wave of Sovietization (in the second meaning) occurred in Mongolia and later during and after World War II in Central Europe (Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland etc.). In a broad sense, this included (voluntary and involuntary) adoption of Soviet-like institutions, laws, customs, traditions and the Soviet way of life, both on a national level and in smaller communities. This was usually promoted and sped up by propaganda aimed at creating a common way of life in all states within the Soviet sphere of influence. In many cases, Sovietization was also accompanied by forced resettlement of large categories of "class enemies" (kulaks, or osadniks, for instance) to the Gulag labor camps and exile settlements.

In a narrow sense, the term Sovietization is often applied to mental and social changes within the population of the Soviet Union and its satellites which led to creation of the new Soviet man (according to its supporters) or Homo Sovieticus (according to its critics).

  1. various authors (2001). "Stalinist Forced Relocation Policies". In Myron Weiner, Sharon Stanton Russell (ed.). Demography and National Security. Berghahn Books. pp. 308–315. ISBN 1-57181-339-X.
  2. Józef Tischner (2005). Etyka solidarności oraz Homo sovieticus (in Polish). Kraków: Znak. p. 295. ISBN 83-240-0588-9.
  3. Aleksandr Zinovyev (1986). Homo sovieticus. Grove/Atlantic. ISBN 0-87113-080-7.

Sovietization
Sovietization Language Watch Edit This article needs additional citations for verification Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources Unsourced material may be challenged and removed Find sources Sovietization news newspapers books scholar JSTOR April 2014 Learn how and when to remove this template message Sovietization Russian Sovetizaciya is the adoption of a political system based on the model of soviets workers councils or the adoption of a way of life mentality and culture modelled after the Soviet Union This often included adopting Cyrillic script and sometimes also the Russian language Latvian National Theatre decorated with Soviet symbols hammer and sickle red star red flags and a double portrait of Lenin and Stalin after the Soviet occupation in 1940 The text on top reads Long live USSR A notable wave of Sovietization in the second meaning occurred in Mongolia and later during and after World War II in Central Europe Czechoslovakia East Germany Hungary Poland etc In a broad sense this included voluntary and involuntary adoption of Soviet like institutions laws customs traditions and the Soviet way of life both on a national level and in smaller communities This was usually promoted and sped up by propaganda aimed at creating a common way of life in all states within the Soviet sphere of influence In many cases Sovietization was also accompanied by forced resettlement of large categories of class enemies kulaks or osadniks for instance to the Gulag labor camps and exile settlements 1 In a narrow sense the term Sovietization is often applied to mental and social changes within the population of the Soviet Union and its satellites 2 which led to creation of the new Soviet man according to its supporters or Homo Sovieticus according to its critics 3 See also EditSovietization of the Baltic states Soviet socialist patriotism Russification Korenizatsiya National delimitation in the Soviet UnionReferences Edit various authors 2001 Stalinist Forced Relocation Policies In Myron Weiner Sharon Stanton Russell ed Demography and National Security Berghahn Books pp 308 315 ISBN 1 57181 339 X Jozef Tischner 2005 Etyka solidarnosci oraz Homo sovieticus in Polish Krakow Znak p 295 ISBN 83 240 0588 9 Aleksandr Zinovyev 1986 Homo sovieticus Grove Atlantic ISBN 0 87113 080 7 Further reading EditEdward J O Boyle January 1993 Work Habits and Customer Service in Post Communist Poland International Journal of Social Economics 20 1 Weeks Theodore R 2010 Russification Sovietization EGO European History Online Mainz Institute of European History retrieved March 25 2021 pdf Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Sovietization amp oldid 1051148489, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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