fbpx
Wikipedia

State of the Nation Address (Philippines)

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.
Find sources: "State of the Nation Address" Philippinesnews · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR
(January 2008) ()

The State of the Nation Address (SONA; Filipino: Talumpati sa Kalagayan ng Bansa) is an annual address by the president of the Philippines to a joint session of the Congress of the Philippines. Mandated by the 1987 Constitution, the speech is delivered every fourth Monday of July at the Plenary Session Hall of the Batasang Pambansa Complex in Batasan Hills, Quezon City.

State of the Nation Address
President Rodrigo Duterte delivers his first State of the Nation Address at the Session Hall of the Batasang Pambansa Complex on July 25, 2016
StatusActive
GenreSpeech
FrequencyAnnually; 4th Monday of July
VenueBatasang Pambansa Complex
Location(s)Quezon City
CountryPhilippines
InauguratedJune 16, 1936 (1936-06-16)
Most recentJuly 26, 2021 (2021-07-26)
ParticipantsPresident of the Philippines
AttendanceCongress of the Philippines

The SONA, which is often broadcast, serves as a means to inform the nation about its present economic, political, and social condition. It is also a vehicle for the president to summarize the accomplishments and plans of their program of government both for a particular year and until the end of their term of office.

Contents

The Address is usually delivered at around 16:00 PST (UTC+8). Before the appointed time, legislators enter the Plenary Session Hall, with members of Congress and their consorts in recent years sporting traditionally-inspired bespoke couture that, in some cases, expresses their legislative agenda or ideological leanings.

The President meanwhile arrives at the Batasang Pambansa Complex some minutes before the beginning of the joint session, and enters the main building through a back entrance. The President is then welcomed with military honors, and greeted by the Speaker of the House, the President of the Senate, and the welcoming committee, before proceeding to the Presidential Legislate Liaison Office.

The President then enters the Plenary Session Hall as the Presidential Anthem is played. The Secretary General introduces the President, who approaches the rostrum and is seated. The President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House then convene the joint session, and the House of Representatives Choir leads the now standing assembly in singing Lupang Hinirang. Representatives of various religious groups then lead the assembly in an ecumenical prayer.

The Speaker then introduces the President in English or Filipino with words similar to the following:

"[Ladies and gentlemen], [honorable] members of [the] Congress [of the Philippines], [His/Her Excellency], [Name], [the] President [of (the Republic of) the Philippines]."

The Address, which can last anywhere from one to several hours, is broadcast on television, radio, and online streaming by state agencies such as Radio Television Malacañang, as well as private media organizations.

Malolos Congress

An early form of the Address was in place during the First Philippine Republic, which was established in 1899 in Malolos, Bulacan. The revolutionary government took ideas from European parliaments, where the magisterial role of the head of state in the legislature was to mark the legislature's official opening.

The Malolos Constitution of 1899 provided for the President to preside over the opening of Congress, as well as convey his messages to the legislature through a secretary. When Emilio Aguinaldo addressed the Malolos Congress in Spanish on September 15, 1898, he simply congratulated the formation of the first representative body of the Philippines and Asia. This is not considered a State of the Nation Address because the Malolos Constitution did not explicitly provide for one.

American Period

The State of the Nation Address as an annual practice began during the Commonwealth Era.

The Jones Act enacted in 1916 was the first instance where a report about the Philippine Islands was required to be submitted. However, the law only mandated a report by the Governor-General to an executive office assigned by the President of the United States. This was in the form of a written document that discussed the transactions and movements of the Insular Government.

When the Commonwealth of the Philippines was created and the 1935 Constitution enacted, it provided for an annual report of the President of the Philippines to Congress:

"The President shall from time to time give to the Congress information on the state of the Nation, and recommend to its consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient."

The first formal State of the Nation Address was delivered by President Manuel L. Quezon on June 16, 1936 at the Legislative Building in Manila. The dates of the SONA were fixed on June 16 of every year at the start of opening sessions of Congress, by virtue of Commonwealth Act No. 17. However, CA 49 changed the date of the opening of Congress to October 16.

President Quezon delivering his 7th and last State of the Nation Address in January 1941

In 1937, October 16 fell on a Saturday, and the opening of Congress was moved to 18th, when Quezon gave the second State of the Nation Address. The opening date of Congress was again changed that year to the fourth Monday of every year. President Manuel L. Quezon delivered his final State of the Nation Address on January 31, 1941, prior to the onset of World War II.

Second World War

José P. Laurel, president of the Japanese-sponsored puppet Second Republic, was able to deliver his only message before the special session of the National Assembly, led by Speaker Benigno S. Aquino, Sr., on 18 October at the Legislative Building—four days after the Second Republic's establishment. This is, however, not considered a SONA as the 1943 Constitution did not—as President Laurel himself pointed out—provide for such an address.

With the 1945 defeat of the Japanese Empire and the re-establishment of the Commonwealth Government, the now-bicameral Congress of the Philippines convened on June 9, 1945, the first time since their election in 1941. During this special session, President Sergio Osmeña addressed lawmakers at their provisional quarters (a repurposed schoolhouse) along Lepanto Street in Manila, and gave a comprehensive report on the work carried out by the Commonwealth Government during its three-year as a government-in-exile in Washington, D.C. Furthermore, he described the conditions prevailing in the Philippines during the Japanese Occupation and an acknowledgment of the invaluable assistance rendered by recognized guerrillas to combined Filipino and American forces in the liberation of the Philippines.

The last Address of the Commonwealth was delivered by President Manuel Roxas on June 3, 1946. President Roxas would later deliver the first SONA of the Third Philippine Republic in front of the First Congress on January 27, 1947.

Third Republic

Beginning in 1949, the SONA was delivered at the rebuilt Legislative Building. Only once did a President not appear personally before Congress: on January 23, 1950, President Elpidio Quirino, who was recuperating at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, delivered his SONA to a joint session of Congress via RCA. The Address was picked up by a local radio network at 10:00 Philippine Time (GMT+8), in time for the opening of the regular session of the 2nd Congress.

Martial Law and the Fourth Republic

President Ferdinand Marcos delivers a speech in the 1972 SONA.

The tradition of delivering the SONA on the fourth Monday of January ended in 1972, when from 1973 to 1977, President Ferdinand E. Marcos delivered the Address every September 21—the official anniversary of his imposition of Martial Law upon the country. Since Congress was abolished with the promulgation of the 1973 Constitution, these addresses were delivered before a legislative assembly either in Malacañang Palace or at Rizal Park, except in 1976 when the Address was given during the opening of the Batasang Bayan at the Philippine International Convention Center.

President Marcos began giving the Address at the Batasang Pambansa Complex on June 12, 1978 during the opening session of the Interim Batasang Pambansa. From 1979 onwards, the SONA was delivered on the fourth Monday of July, following the provisions in the 1973 Constitution and the superseding 1987 Constitution. The only exceptions to this were in 1983, when the SONA was delivered on January 17 (the anniversary of the 1973 Constitution's ratification and the second anniversary of the lifting of Martial Law), and in 1986 when President Corazón C. Aquino did not deliver any SONA following the People Power Revolution. as there was no legislature by then speak of. as she had dissolved the Batasang Pambansa, and a new constitution has yet to be ratified by then.

Fifth Republic

With the re-establishment of Congress in 1987, President Corazon Aquino delivered her first SONA at the Plenary Hall of the Batasang Pambansa. All her successors in the office have since delivered their respective Addresses in the same venue.

The political opposition has had a response to the address, known as "kontra-SONA" (transl. counter SONA). Usually, the Minority Leader of the House of Representatives delivers the response in a session of Congress, a few days after the actual SONA. In the Senate, the kontra-SONA has been delivered more sporadically, but there were instances of it being done.

Protests are done on the day of the address itself. Protests usually occur for the second and subsequent addresses of each president, with the first address usually free from such. Protests are done at Commonwealth Avenue, Quezon City, the main road leading to the Batasang Pambansa Complex, and Mendiola Street, fronting Malacañang Palace. Leftist groups such as the Bagong Alyansang Makabayan usually burn an effigy of the sitting president as a highlight of the protest.

Local chief executives also give their own addresses modeled after the State of the Nation Address. These speeches are not mandated by law, but are given usually as a matter of practice or tradition.

Recent addresses have been the subject of criticism by various sectors for being too ostentatious and flashy, with politicians and media personalities treating the event as a red carpet fashion show. Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago blasted the organizers and called the event a "thoughtless extravagance" where "peacocks spread their tails and turn around and around, as coached by media in a feeding frenzy." Presumptive House Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez for the 17th Congress urged representatives to dress in simple business attire for future addresses, preferably the Barong Tagalog for men and "short" Filipiniana for women, in preparation for President Rodrigo Duterte's first address in 2016.

  1. Pedrosa, Carmen N. (July 22, 2018). "Is a State of the Nation Address necessary?". philstar.com. The Philippine Star. RetrievedJuly 26, 2019.
  2. "Historical Background of the State of the Nation Address". Official Gazette. President of the Philippines. RetrievedJanuary 27, 2014.
  3. Gagalac, Ron (July 26, 2011). "Opposition to deliver 'Kontra-SONA'". ABS-CBN News. RetrievedFebruary 16, 2021.
  4. Ager, Maila (August 6, 2014). "Ejercito on his 'Kontra-Sona': No minority blessing, no problem". INQUIRER.net. RetrievedFebruary 16, 2021.
  5. Villaruel, Jauhn Etienne (July 26, 2021). "From peace murals to beheaded 'Endo king': A lookback to Duterte SONA protest effigies". ABS-CBN News. RetrievedJuly 26, 2021.
  6. http://www.rappler.com/nation/34585-miriam-santiago-sona-uniform[dead link]
  7. Cepeda, Mara (July 8, 2016). "SONA guests told: It's not a party, dress simply". Rappler. RetrievedJuly 8, 2016.

State of the Nation Address (Philippines)
State of the Nation Address Philippines Article Talk Language Watch Edit This article needs additional citations for verification Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources Unsourced material may be challenged and removed Find sources State of the Nation Address Philippines news newspapers books scholar JSTOR January 2008 Learn how and when to remove this template message The State of the Nation Address SONA Filipino Talumpati sa Kalagayan ng Bansa 1 is an annual address by the president of the Philippines to a joint session of the Congress of the Philippines Mandated by the 1987 Constitution the speech is delivered every fourth Monday of July at the Plenary Session Hall of the Batasang Pambansa Complex in Batasan Hills Quezon City State of the Nation AddressPresident Rodrigo Duterte delivers his first State of the Nation Address at the Session Hall of the Batasang Pambansa Complex on July 25 2016StatusActiveGenreSpeechFrequencyAnnually 4th Monday of JulyVenueBatasang Pambansa ComplexLocation s Quezon CityCountryPhilippinesInauguratedJune 16 1936 1936 06 16 Most recentJuly 26 2021 2021 07 26 ParticipantsPresident of the PhilippinesAttendanceCongress of the Philippines The SONA which is often broadcast serves as a means to inform the nation about its present economic political and social condition It is also a vehicle for the president to summarize the accomplishments and plans of their program of government both for a particular year and until the end of their term of office Contents 1 Ceremonial of the President 2 History 2 1 Malolos Congress 2 2 American Period 2 2 1 Second World War 2 3 Third Republic 2 4 Martial Law and the Fourth Republic 2 5 Fifth Republic 3 Responses 4 Variations 5 Criticism 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCeremonial of the President EditThe Address is usually delivered at around 16 00 PST UTC 8 Before the appointed time legislators enter the Plenary Session Hall with members of Congress and their consorts in recent years sporting traditionally inspired bespoke couture that in some cases expresses their legislative agenda or ideological leanings The President meanwhile arrives at the Batasang Pambansa Complex some minutes before the beginning of the joint session and enters the main building through a back entrance The President is then welcomed with military honors and greeted by the Speaker of the House the President of the Senate and the welcoming committee before proceeding to the Presidential Legislate Liaison Office The President then enters the Plenary Session Hall as the Presidential Anthem is played The Secretary General introduces the President who approaches the rostrum and is seated The President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House then convene the joint session and the House of Representatives Choir leads the now standing assembly in singing Lupang Hinirang Representatives of various religious groups then lead the assembly in an ecumenical prayer The Speaker then introduces the President in English or Filipino with words similar to the following Ladies and gentlemen honorable members of the Congress of the Philippines His Her Excellency Name the President of the Republic of the Philippines The Address which can last anywhere from one to several hours is broadcast on television radio and online streaming by state agencies such as Radio Television Malacanang as well as private media organizations History EditFurther information List of State of the Nation Addresses Philippines Malolos Congress Edit An early form of the Address was in place during the First Philippine Republic which was established in 1899 in Malolos Bulacan The revolutionary government took ideas from European parliaments where the magisterial role of the head of state in the legislature was to mark the legislature s official opening The Malolos Constitution of 1899 provided for the President to preside over the opening of Congress as well as convey his messages to the legislature through a secretary When Emilio Aguinaldo addressed the Malolos Congress in Spanish on September 15 1898 he simply congratulated the formation of the first representative body of the Philippines and Asia This is not considered a State of the Nation Address because the Malolos Constitution did not explicitly provide for one American Period Edit The State of the Nation Address as an annual practice began during the Commonwealth Era 2 The Jones Act enacted in 1916 was the first instance where a report about the Philippine Islands was required to be submitted However the law only mandated a report by the Governor General to an executive office assigned by the President of the United States This was in the form of a written document that discussed the transactions and movements of the Insular Government When the Commonwealth of the Philippines was created and the 1935 Constitution enacted it provided for an annual report of the President of the Philippines to Congress The President shall from time to time give to the Congress information on the state of the Nation and recommend to its consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient 2 The first formal State of the Nation Address was delivered by President Manuel L Quezon on June 16 1936 at the Legislative Building in Manila 2 The dates of the SONA were fixed on June 16 of every year at the start of opening sessions of Congress by virtue of Commonwealth Act No 17 However CA 49 changed the date of the opening of Congress to October 16 President Quezon delivering his 7th and last State of the Nation Address in January 1941 In 1937 October 16 fell on a Saturday and the opening of Congress was moved to 18th when Quezon gave the second State of the Nation Address The opening date of Congress was again changed that year to the fourth Monday of every year President Manuel L Quezon delivered his final State of the Nation Address on January 31 1941 prior to the onset of World War II Second World War Edit Jose P Laurel president of the Japanese sponsored puppet Second Republic was able to deliver his only message before the special session of the National Assembly led by Speaker Benigno S Aquino Sr on 18 October at the Legislative Building four days after the Second Republic s establishment This is however not considered a SONA as the 1943 Constitution did not as President Laurel himself pointed out provide for such an address With the 1945 defeat of the Japanese Empire and the re establishment of the Commonwealth Government the now bicameral Congress of the Philippines convened on June 9 1945 the first time since their election in 1941 During this special session President Sergio Osmena addressed lawmakers at their provisional quarters a repurposed schoolhouse along Lepanto Street in Manila and gave a comprehensive report on the work carried out by the Commonwealth Government during its three year as a government in exile in Washington D C Furthermore he described the conditions prevailing in the Philippines during the Japanese Occupation and an acknowledgment of the invaluable assistance rendered by recognized guerrillas to combined Filipino and American forces in the liberation of the Philippines The last Address of the Commonwealth was delivered by President Manuel Roxas on June 3 1946 President Roxas would later deliver the first SONA of the Third Philippine Republic in front of the First Congress on January 27 1947 Third Republic Edit Beginning in 1949 the SONA was delivered at the rebuilt Legislative Building Only once did a President not appear personally before Congress on January 23 1950 President Elpidio Quirino who was recuperating at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore Maryland delivered his SONA to a joint session of Congress via RCA The Address was picked up by a local radio network at 10 00 Philippine Time GMT 8 in time for the opening of the regular session of the 2nd Congress Martial Law and the Fourth Republic Edit President Ferdinand Marcos delivers a speech in the 1972 SONA The tradition of delivering the SONA on the fourth Monday of January ended in 1972 when from 1973 to 1977 President Ferdinand E Marcos delivered the Address every September 21 the official anniversary of his imposition of Martial Law upon the country Since Congress was abolished with the promulgation of the 1973 Constitution these addresses were delivered before a legislative assembly either in Malacanang Palace or at Rizal Park except in 1976 when the Address was given during the opening of the Batasang Bayan at the Philippine International Convention Center President Marcos began giving the Address at the Batasang Pambansa Complex on June 12 1978 during the opening session of the Interim Batasang Pambansa From 1979 onwards the SONA was delivered on the fourth Monday of July following the provisions in the 1973 Constitution and the superseding 1987 Constitution The only exceptions to this were in 1983 when the SONA was delivered on January 17 the anniversary of the 1973 Constitution s ratification and the second anniversary of the lifting of Martial Law and in 1986 when President Corazon C Aquino did not deliver any SONA following the People Power Revolution as there was no legislature by then speak of as she had dissolved the Batasang Pambansa and a new constitution has yet to be ratified by then Fifth Republic Edit With the re establishment of Congress in 1987 President Corazon Aquino delivered her first SONA at the Plenary Hall of the Batasang Pambansa All her successors in the office have since delivered their respective Addresses in the same venue Responses EditThe political opposition has had a response to the address known as kontra SONA transl counter SONA Usually the Minority Leader of the House of Representatives delivers the response in a session of Congress a few days after the actual SONA 3 In the Senate the kontra SONA has been delivered more sporadically but there were instances of it being done 4 Protests are done on the day of the address itself Protests usually occur for the second and subsequent addresses of each president with the first address usually free from such Protests are done at Commonwealth Avenue Quezon City the main road leading to the Batasang Pambansa Complex and Mendiola Street fronting Malacanang Palace Leftist groups such as the Bagong Alyansang Makabayan usually burn an effigy of the sitting president as a highlight of the protest 5 Variations EditLocal chief executives also give their own addresses modeled after the State of the Nation Address These speeches are not mandated by law but are given usually as a matter of practice or tradition At the provincial level the governor s speech is called a State of the Province Address SOPA At the civic and municipal level this is called either a State of the City Address SOCA or State of the Municipality Address SOMA given by the mayor At the barangay level the barangay chairman speech is called a State of the Barangay Address SOBA It is also the practice of the Philippine Independent Church a Christian denomination formed in the wake of the Philippine Revolution in the spirit of a national church to release an annual State of the Church Address coming from the Obispo Maximo Supreme Bishop Criticism EditRecent addresses have been the subject of criticism by various sectors for being too ostentatious and flashy with politicians and media personalities treating the event as a red carpet fashion show Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago blasted the organizers and called the event a thoughtless extravagance where peacocks spread their tails and turn around and around as coached by media in a feeding frenzy 6 Presumptive House Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez for the 17th Congress urged representatives to dress in simple business attire for future addresses preferably the Barong Tagalog for men and short Filipiniana for women in preparation for President Rodrigo Duterte s first address in 2016 7 See also EditGovernment policy statement State of the Nation disambiguation Speech from the throne State Opening of Parliament in the United Kingdom State of the Union in the United StatesReferences Edit Pedrosa Carmen N July 22 2018 Is a State of the Nation Address necessary philstar com The Philippine Star Retrieved July 26 2019 a b c Historical Background of the State of the Nation Address Official Gazette President of the Philippines Retrieved January 27 2014 Gagalac Ron July 26 2011 Opposition to deliver Kontra SONA ABS CBN News Retrieved February 16 2021 Ager Maila August 6 2014 Ejercito on his Kontra Sona No minority blessing no problem INQUIRER net Retrieved February 16 2021 Villaruel Jauhn Etienne July 26 2021 From peace murals to beheaded Endo king A lookback to Duterte SONA protest effigies ABS CBN News Retrieved July 26 2021 http www rappler com nation 34585 miriam santiago sona uniform dead link Cepeda Mara July 8 2016 SONA guests told It s not a party dress simply Rappler Retrieved July 8 2016 External links EditWikisource has original text related to this article Portal State of the Nation Speeches by Philippine PresidentsList of all past addresses from the Office of the President of the Philippines Historical Background of the State of the Nation Address from the Office of the President of the Philippines The State of the Nation Address Traditions and History from the Office of the President of the Philippines Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title State of the Nation Address Philippines amp oldid 1052513848, wikipedia, wiki, book,

books

, library,

article

, read, download, free, free download, mp3, video, mp4, 3gp, jpg, jpeg, gif, png, picture, music, song, movie, book, game, games.