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Stater

The stater ( or; Ancient Greek:στατήρ IPA: , literally "weight") was an ancient coin used in various regions of Greece. The term is also used for similar coins, imitating Greek staters, minted elsewhere in ancient Europe.

Silver staters
An early Archaic silver stater from Corinth, 555–515 BC. Obverse: Pegasus flying left, koppa below. Reverse: quadripartite incuse
Silver stater from Delphi, 338/6–334/3 BC. Obverse: head of Demeter left, wearing grain-ear wreath and veil. Reverse: Apollo seated left on omphalos, tripod to left, ΑΜΦΙΚΤΙΟΝΩΝ around.

Contents

The stater, as a Greek silver currency, first as ingots, and later as coins, circulated from the 8th century BC to AD 50. The earliest known stamped stater (having the mark of some authority in the form of a picture or words) is an electrum turtle coin, struck at Aegina that dates to about 700 BC. It is on display at the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris. According to Robin Lane Fox, the stater as a weight unit was borrowed by the Euboean stater weighing 16.8 grams (0.59 oz) from the Phoenician shekel, which had about the same weight as a stater (7.0 g, 0.25 oz) and was also one fiftieth of a mina.

Gold 20-stater of the Greco-Bactrian king Eucratides I, the largest gold coin ever minted in Antiquity. The coin weighs 169.2 g (5.97 oz), and has a diameter of 58 mm (2.3 in).

The silver stater minted at Corinth of 8.6 g (0.30 oz) weight was divided into three silver drachmae of 2.9 g (0.10 oz), but was often linked to the Athenian silver didrachm (two drachmae) weighing 8.6 g (0.30 oz). In comparison, the Athenian silver tetradrachm (four drachmae) weighed 17.2 g (0.61 oz). Staters were also struck in several Greek city-states such as, Aegina, Aspendos, Delphi, Knossos, Kydonia, many city-states of Ionia, Lampsacus, Megalopolis, Metapontium, Olympia, Phaistos, Poseidonia, Syracuse, Taras, Thasos, Thebes and more.

There also existed a "gold stater", but it was only minted in some places, and was mainly an accounting unit worth 20–28 drachmae depending on place and time, the Athenian unit being worth 20 drachmae. (The reason being that one gold stater generally weighed roughly 8.5 g (0.30 oz), twice as much as a drachma, while the parity of gold to silver, after some variance, was established as 1:10). The use of gold staters in coinage seems mostly of Macedonian origin. The best known types of Greek gold staters are the 28-drachma kyzikenoi from Cyzicus.

A Celtic stater made from billon alloy found in Armorica

Celtic tribes brought the concept to Western and Central Europe after obtaining it while serving as mercenaries in north Greece. Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs modeled after those of Philip II of Macedonia, which were brought back after serving in his armies, or those of Alexander and his successors. Some of these staters in the form of the Gallo-Belgic series were imported to Britain on a large scale. These went on to influence a range of staters produced in Britain. British Gold staters generally weighed between 4.5 and 6.5 grams (0.16–0.23 oz).

Celtic staters were also minted in present-day Czech Republic and Poland. The conquests of Alexander extended Greek culture east, leading to the adoption of staters in Asia. Gold staters have also been found from the ancient region of Gandhara from the time of Kanishka.

In 2018, archaeologists in Podzemelj, Slovenia unearthed fifteen graves at the Pezdirčeva Njiva site. In one of the graves they found a bronze belt with a gold coin. The coin was a Celtic imitation of the Alexander the Great stater, depicting Nike and Athena, and dates back to the first half of the 3rd century B.C.

  1. Merriam-Webster
  2. Coin images
  3. Ancient coinage of Aegina. snible.org. Retrieved on 2011-02-10.
  4. Lane Fox, Robin. Travelling Heroes: Greeks and Their Myths in the Epic Age of Homer. P. 94. London: Allen Lane, 2008. ISBN 978-0-7139-9980-8
  5. Smith, William. A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities. J. Murray, 1881.
  6. Catalogue of Greek coins, A. Baldwin, Boston, 1955
  7. De Jersey, Philip (1996). Celtic Coinage in Britain. Shire Publications. pp. 1–2. ISBN 0-7478-0325-0.
  8. De Jersey, Philip (1996). Celtic Coinage in Britain. Shire Publications. pp. 15–19. ISBN 0-7478-0325-0.
  9. De Jersey, Philip (1996). Celtic Coinage in Britain. Shire Publications. pp. 20–26. ISBN 0-7478-0325-0.
  10. Bean, Simon C (1994). "Methodology". The coinage of Atrebates and Regni(PDF) (Ph.D.). University of Nottingham. pp. 17–18. Retrieved14 July 2016.
  11. Żabiński, Zbigniew (1981). Systemy pieniężne na ziemiach polskich. Zakład Narodowy Im. Ossolińskich, PAN. p. 22. ISBN 83-04-00569-7.
  12. Prabha Ray Himanshu (2006-06-01). Coins in India. Marg Publications. ISBN 978-81-85026-73-2.
  13. A significant find at Pezdirčeva Njiva: A gold coin from the 3rd century B. C.

Stater
Stater Language Watch Edit The stater ˈ s t eɪ t er or s t ɑː ˈ t ɛer 1 Ancient Greek stathr IPA statɛ ːr literally weight was an ancient coin used in various regions of Greece The term is also used for similar coins imitating Greek staters minted elsewhere in ancient Europe Silver statersAn early Archaic silver stater from Corinth 555 515 BC Obverse Pegasus flying left koppa below Reverse quadripartite incuseSilver stater from Delphi 338 6 334 3 BC Obverse head of Demeter left wearing grain ear wreath and veil Reverse Apollo seated left on omphalos tripod to left AMFIKTIONWN around Contents 1 History 2 Non Greek staters 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory EditThe stater as a Greek silver currency first as ingots and later as coins circulated from the 8th century BC to AD 50 The earliest known stamped stater having the mark of some authority in the form of a picture or words is an electrum turtle coin struck at Aegina 2 that dates to about 700 BC 3 It is on display at the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris According to Robin Lane Fox the stater as a weight unit was borrowed by the Euboean stater weighing 16 8 grams 0 59 oz from the Phoenician shekel which had about the same weight as a stater 7 0 g 0 25 oz and was also one fiftieth of a mina 4 Gold 20 stater of the Greco Bactrian king Eucratides I the largest gold coin ever minted in Antiquity The coin weighs 169 2 g 5 97 oz and has a diameter of 58 mm 2 3 in The silver stater minted at Corinth 5 of 8 6 g 0 30 oz weight was divided into three silver drachmae of 2 9 g 0 10 oz but was often linked to the Athenian silver didrachm two drachmae weighing 8 6 g 0 30 oz 6 In comparison the Athenian silver tetradrachm four drachmae weighed 17 2 g 0 61 oz Staters were also struck in several Greek city states such as Aegina Aspendos Delphi Knossos Kydonia many city states of Ionia Lampsacus Megalopolis Metapontium Olympia Phaistos Poseidonia Syracuse Taras Thasos Thebes and more There also existed a gold stater but it was only minted in some places and was mainly an accounting unit worth 20 28 drachmae depending on place and time the Athenian unit being worth 20 drachmae The reason being that one gold stater generally weighed roughly 8 5 g 0 30 oz twice as much as a drachma while the parity of gold to silver after some variance was established as 1 10 The use of gold staters in coinage seems mostly of Macedonian origin The best known types of Greek gold staters are the 28 drachma kyzikenoi from Cyzicus Non Greek staters Edit A Celtic stater made from billon alloy found in Armorica Celtic tribes brought the concept to Western and Central Europe after obtaining it while serving as mercenaries in north Greece 7 Gold staters were minted in Gaul by Gallic chiefs modeled after those of Philip II of Macedonia which were brought back after serving in his armies or those of Alexander and his successors 7 Some of these staters in the form of the Gallo Belgic series were imported to Britain on a large scale 8 These went on to influence a range of staters produced in Britain 9 British Gold staters generally weighed between 4 5 and 6 5 grams 0 16 0 23 oz 10 Celtic staters were also minted in present day Czech Republic and Poland 11 The conquests of Alexander extended Greek culture east leading to the adoption of staters in Asia Gold staters have also been found from the ancient region of Gandhara from the time of Kanishka 12 In 2018 archaeologists in Podzemelj Slovenia unearthed fifteen graves at the Pezdirceva Njiva site In one of the graves they found a bronze belt with a gold coin The coin was a Celtic imitation of the Alexander the Great stater depicting Nike and Athena and dates back to the first half of the 3rd century B C 13 Gallery Edit Early 6th century BC Lydian electrum coin denominated as 1 3 stater Corinthian stater Obverse Pegasus with Qoppa Ϙ beneath Reverse Athena wearing Corinthian helmet Qoppa symbolised the archaic spelling of the city Ϙorin8os Gold stater of Alexander the Great Obverse Athena wearing Corinthian helmet Reverse Nike holding stylis and wreath Possibly minted in Abydos c 328 323 BC Stater struck in Velia 334 300 BC Athena wearing a Phrygian helmet decorated with a Centaur Lion devouring prey Silver stater of Mithrapata of Lycia c 390 370 BC Gold stater of the Corieltauvi 50 20 BCSee also Edit Money portal Numismatics portal Coson Egyptian gold stater Silver stater with a turtleReferences Edit Merriam Webster Coin images Ancient coinage of Aegina snible org Retrieved on 2011 02 10 Lane Fox Robin Travelling Heroes Greeks and Their Myths in the Epic Age of Homer P 94 London Allen Lane 2008 ISBN 978 0 7139 9980 8 Smith William A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities J Murray 1881 Catalogue of Greek coins A Baldwin Boston 1955 a b De Jersey Philip 1996 Celtic Coinage in Britain Shire Publications pp 1 2 ISBN 0 7478 0325 0 De Jersey Philip 1996 Celtic Coinage in Britain Shire Publications pp 15 19 ISBN 0 7478 0325 0 De Jersey Philip 1996 Celtic Coinage in Britain Shire Publications pp 20 26 ISBN 0 7478 0325 0 Bean Simon C 1994 Methodology The coinage of Atrebates and Regni PDF Ph D University of Nottingham pp 17 18 Retrieved 14 July 2016 Zabinski Zbigniew 1981 Systemy pieniezne na ziemiach polskich Zaklad Narodowy Im Ossolinskich PAN p 22 ISBN 83 04 00569 7 Prabha Ray Himanshu 2006 06 01 Coins in India Marg Publications ISBN 978 81 85026 73 2 A significant find at Pezdirceva Njiva A gold coin from the 3rd century B C External links Edit The dictionary definition of stater at Wiktionary The British Museum Electrum 1 6 stater 650 600 BCE Silver stater with Pegasus and head of Athena wearing a Corinthian helmet Akarnania Akarnanian Confederacy c 250 167 BCE Thyrreion mint Stater coins review article Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Stater amp oldid 1050339203, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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