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Wikipedia

Storefront

A storefront or shopfront is the facade or entryway of a retail store located on the ground floor or street level of a commercial building, typically including one or more display windows. A storefront functions to attract visual attention to a business and its merchandise.

Storefront of a food shop in Kaunas
Storefront of a bookshop in Tallinn

Contents

Before the middle of the 19th century, shop fronts did not have large display windows, but often included features such as awnings and bay windows to attract the attention of passersby.[citation needed] Modern storefronts with display windows developed at mid-century after architectural cast iron became widely available and glass manufacturers began producing large panes of glass at relatively low cost.

In the United States, storefronts with large windows become available after 1883, when the Pittsburgh Plate Glass company started to produce plate glass. Also architects started to experiment with iron columns and lintels at the ground floor level.The combination of these two achievements led to the storefront as we know it today. By the 1920s, storefront plans with deep display windows, known as the “arcaded” front, had become popular.

The storefronts of commercial buildings are often substantially altered even when other architectural elements remain intact. Such alterations can adversely affect a historic building's architectural and historic character. Storefronts can also have an area in front of the unit called a "pop-out zone", which is about 500-1000 mm deep. Storefronts often use channel letters.

E-commerce websites are sometimes called "online storefronts" or "virtual storefronts".

  1. "Sign and Facade Guidelines"(PDF). City of Somerville, Massachusetts. 2008.
  2. Jandl, H. Ward (1982). "Rehabilitating Historic Storefronts". National Park Service. RetrievedAugust 7, 2021.
  3. Bock, Gordon (1988). "Glass Notes". The Old-House Journal (August): 38. RetrievedAugust 1, 2021 – via Google Books.
  4. Jackson, Mike (2014). "Main Street meets Mid-Century Design"(PDF). MainStreetNow (Summer): 10. RetrievedAugust 7, 2021.
  5. Mesher, Lynne (2017). Basics Interior Design 01: Retail Design. Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 147. ISBN 9781350034495 – via Google Books.
  6. Davies, Helen (April 20, 2021). "Full Look Into Your Storefront Sign Cost: 6 Main Points". frontsigns.com. RetrievedAugust 7, 2021.
  7. Lynch, C.G. (May 18, 2008). "Most Virtual Storefronts Fail". PC World.
  8. Raymond, Scott (March 2, 2011). "Virtual storefronts vs. brick-and-mortar". ZDnet.
Wikimedia Commons has media related toShopfronts.

Storefront
Storefront Article Talk Language Watch Edit A storefront or shopfront is the facade or entryway of a retail store located on the ground floor or street level of a commercial building typically including one or more display windows A storefront functions to attract visual attention to a business and its merchandise 1 Storefront of a food shop in Kaunas Storefront of a bookshop in Tallinn Contents 1 History 2 Storefront designs 3 Other uses 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory EditBefore the middle of the 19th century shop fronts did not have large display windows but often included features such as awnings and bay windows to attract the attention of passersby citation needed Modern storefronts with display windows developed at mid century after architectural cast iron became widely available and glass manufacturers began producing large panes of glass at relatively low cost 2 In the United States storefronts with large windows become available after 1883 when the Pittsburgh Plate Glass company started to produce plate glass 3 Also architects started to experiment with iron columns and lintels at the ground floor level The combination of these two achievements led to the storefront as we know it today 2 By the 1920s storefront plans with deep display windows known as the arcaded front had become popular 4 Storefront designs EditThe storefronts of commercial buildings are often substantially altered even when other architectural elements remain intact Such alterations can adversely affect a historic building s architectural and historic character 2 Storefronts can also have an area in front of the unit called a pop out zone which is about 500 1000 mm deep 5 Storefronts often use channel letters 6 Other uses EditE commerce websites are sometimes called online storefronts or virtual storefronts 7 8 See also EditBrick and mortar Storefront church Storefront schoolReferences Edit Sign and Facade Guidelines PDF City of Somerville Massachusetts 2008 a b c Jandl H Ward 1982 Rehabilitating Historic Storefronts National Park Service Retrieved August 7 2021 Bock Gordon 1988 Glass Notes The Old House Journal August 38 Retrieved August 1 2021 via Google Books Jackson Mike 2014 Main Street meets Mid Century Design PDF MainStreetNow Summer 10 Retrieved August 7 2021 Mesher Lynne 2017 Basics Interior Design 01 Retail Design Bloomsbury Publishing p 147 ISBN 9781350034495 via Google Books Davies Helen April 20 2021 Full Look Into Your Storefront Sign Cost 6 Main Points frontsigns com Retrieved August 7 2021 Lynch C G May 18 2008 Most Virtual Storefronts Fail PC World Raymond Scott March 2 2011 Virtual storefronts vs brick and mortar ZDnet Wikimedia Commons has media related to Shopfronts This architectural element related article is a stub You can help Wikipedia by expanding it vte Retrieved from https en wikipedia org w index php title Storefront amp oldid 1052137041, wikipedia, wiki, book,

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